Science & Naturehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature[The best of BBC Science and Nature, from TV and radio, to the web and beyond. Take a tour from the smallest atoms, to the largest whales and the most ferocious dinosaurs. Travel from the bottom of the ocean to the furthest stars.]1Adaptations (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptationsAn adaptation is any feature of an animal or plant which makes it better suited for a particular habitat or to do a particular task. For instance, being streamlined is an adaptation to swimming fast and being able to survive on very little water is an adaptation to life in the desert.1Shedding body parts (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/AbscissionShedding body parts, or abscission which means cutting away, is the process by which plants get rid of entire organs that have been damaged or are no longer needed. It includes the dropping of leaves, flowers and fruits such as in autumn when deciduous plants drop their leaves in response to the onset of winter. Fungi and even some animals shed body parts for different reasons. Lizards drop their tails when threatened by a predator, stags cast off their antlers after the rut and snakes shed their skins.1Paternal care (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/AllomotheringPaternal care is where the father of the offspring provides most or all of the effort needed to protect, feed or raise the young until they become independent. The most well-known example of paternal care is in seahorses, where the male broods the eggs in a pouch until they are ready to hatch. Primary paternal care is most common in egg-laying species and almost unheard of in mammals.1Helpless at birth (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/AltricialAltricial species give birth to young that are not very well developed and are utterly incapable of taking care of themselves - humans, rats and blue tits are good examples. The young are often naked, can't yet walk or fly, and are often blind. They rely entirely on their parents for warmth, transport and food. Normally, altricial babies are a feature of small animals that produce big litters of young, with humans being an obvious exception. The opposite of altricial is precocial – active, mobile offspring.1Ambush predator (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/Ambush_predatorAmbushing prey is a tactic employed by a whole host of animals, from trapdoor spiders lurking in their burrows, to a cat stalking a mouse. If ambushers chase their prey at all, they do so for only a short time, as most of them are not capable of a prolonged pursuit. Instead they use cover so they can surprise unsuspecting prey.1Learning (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/Animal_cognitionLearning is the process of picking up new skills. An animal may learn from its own experiences or be taught by another animal, often a parent. Most animal learning is done by observation, followed by trial and error. Play is an important way of learning for many species particularly for honing physical skills such as hunting. Human beings have language, so can speed the whole process up by explaining what the learner is doing wrong and how to correct it.1Culture (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/Animal_cultureCulture is a social system or set of behaviours that is passed down through the generations, and which differs from that seen in other populations of the same species. So for instance, all killer whales are carnivorous, so that is not cultural. But only certain pods of killer whales beach themselves to catch seals, and the necessary skills are taught to young whales by their mother, so that is cultural. Distinct cultures have been observed in many primates and some birds as well as in whales and dolphins.1Able to echolocate (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/Animal_echolocationEcholocation, like the sonar used by ships and submarines, is a method of 'seeing' your environment using sound. Animals such as bats, dolphins and cave swiftlets emit high frequency sounds and listen for the echoes reflected back to them. In this way they can build up a picture of their surroundings, including other creatures that might be nearby.1Language (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/Animal_languageLanguage is a way of communicating through sound, where specific meanings are used in certain circumstances. Many animals have a generic alarm call used for all dangers - this is not language. However, vervet monkeys have different calls for warning each other about snakes, eagles and leopards, and this is sophisticated enough to be considered a proto-language. Other animals with these 'proto-language' abilities are dolphins, apes and parrots.1Migration (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/Animal_migrationMigration is the usually seasonal movement of animals in pursuit of food, suitable breeding sites or to escape bad weather or other environmental conditions. Mass migrations - such as the wildebeest crossing the Mara River, or Pacific salmon heading upstream to mate - create some of the world's greatest wildlife spectacles.1Predation defence (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/Antipredator_adaptationPredation defence comes in many forms: physiological, anatomical and behavioural. Physical defences such as spines and armour are obvious adaptations, but other defences can be more subtle and surprising. Whether it's avoiding detection through camouflage and mimicry, chemical defence through being poisonous or exuding irritants, it's all about one thing: avoiding being eaten. Some animals rely on increasing their chances of detecting predators by living in groups and using alarm calls to warn each other of danger.1Aposematic (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/AposematismWarning colours are markings that warn predators that the owner isn't a good thing to eat - it may be poisonous, dangerous or simply taste bad. The colours are usually two contrasting ones, such as yellow and black, in stripes or blobs. This warning has evolved for maximum impact to as many species as possible, since even colourblind animals can see the patterns. So the stripes of a wasp tells you it can sting.1Adapted to swimming (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/Aquatic_locomotionNatatorial describes animals that are adapted to locomotion in water - they are swimmers. They fall into three categories: those that evolved in water (for instance sharks and jellyfish), those that had land living ancestors but have returned to an aquatic life (dolphins and manatees) and those that split their time between water and land (penguins, crocodiles) and need to move around efficiently in both. Animals which just have a swim now and then - say to cross a river - are not natatorial.1Arboreal (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/Arboreal_locomotionArboreal animals are those that are particularly well adapted to spending most or all of their time in trees. They range from tiny invertebrates to huge orangutans. At the medium to large end of the size spectrum, special physical adaptations aid locomotion up and through the trees, such as prehensile tails, specially adapted claws and loose joints for easy swinging.1Asexual (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/Asexual_reproductionAsexual reproduction is the production of offspring by only one parent. No fertilization of an egg cell or mixing up of the genes takes place, so all the offspring are genetically identical copies of the parent. Greenfly, hydras and strawberry plants can all reproduce asexually as well as sexually.1Bioluminescent (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/BioluminescenceBioluminescence is light created by living organisms and and it can create the most fantastic displays. It includes 'phosphorescence' created by marine creatures and seen on the surface of the sea at night, the light of fireflies and the faint but eerie glow of some fungi. The light is produced chemically for many different reasons: to attract attention, to frighten enemies, to disguise what you really are, or - in the depths of the sea - to provide your own 'headlights' to search out prey.1Camouflaged (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/CamouflageCamouflage is the art of not being seen, practised by predators and prey. Colour might help animals blend in with their environment - even when the animal itself cannot see in colour. Body shapes can make them appear to be some other object common in the same surroundings. Patterns might sometimes make an animal more noticeable, but they can also help disguise outline. The tiger's stripes and the giraffe's patches make them almost impossible to detect in dappled light.1Carnivorous (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/CarnivoreCarnivores are animals whose main method of getting food is to kill and eat other animals, or to scavenge their dead flesh. Typically, the word brings to mind the large predators at the top of the food chain - lions, wolves and the like - but insectivores (insect eaters) and piscivores (fish eaters) are equally carnivorous. The group of mammals, Carnivora, are so called because so many of the species in it (felines, canines, etc) are defined by their carnivorous diet. Some plants are also carnivorous.1Adapted to climbing (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/ClimbingScansorial describes animals that spend much of their life climbing such as squirrels, monkeys, geckos, mountain goats and tree frogs. Whether it's a tree, a cliff or a wall, what an animal climbs has a great influence on how evolution has equipped it for the all important task of not falling off. 'Suction pads' on geckos and the hook-like claws of the sloth are some of the many useful features for a climbing life.1Colonial (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/Colony_%28biology%29Colonial animals live in large groups in close proximity to one other. Colonies might exist only at specific times of the year such as the nesting season for many seabirds. Others, such as a beehive or a den of meerkats, contain a single social unit,and often last for longer than the lifetime of an individual member.1Colonial (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/Colony_(biology)Colonial animals live in large groups in close proximity to one other. Colonies might exist only at specific times of the year such as the nesting season for many seabirds. Others, such as a beehive or a den of meerkats, contain a single social unit,and often last for longer than the lifetime of an individual member.1Co-operative breeder (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/Cooperative_breedingCo-operative breeders recruit last year's grown up offspring or other adult helpers to help raise the latest brood or litter. The minders may look after the young in creches, or individually. Examples include bee-eaters, wolves and of course, humans. If grandma or a child minder helps look after the kids, then that's cooperative breeding!1Dung eater (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/CoprophagiaDung eaters feed on waste, either of other species or their own. Those that eat their own, such as rabbits and ringtail possums, do it because it's so hard to extract nourishment from their nutrient-poor diet that digesting it a second time is worthwhile. In contrast, pikas eat their own dung to keep their salt levels in balance. Some dung eaters, like the dung beetles, play an important ecosystem role in recycling waste and helping to disperse or germinate seeds in the dung.1Courtship display (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/Courtship_displayCourtship displays are performed by animals seeking to advertise their willingness to mate, attract a partner and sometimes to warn off rivals. Famous examples include the dazzling display of a peacock's tail, and the elaborate dancing and acrobatics performed by birds of paradise. In monogamous animals, such as swans and albatrosses, the male and female often do a mutual courtship display, to reaffirm and reinforce the bond between them.1Dry tolerant (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/Desiccation_toleranceDry tolerant plants and animals are able to cope with conditions where water is hard to find. Strategies include preventing its loss, storing for later use and being able to survive on less than normal. These adaptations aren't only important for organisms that live in tropical hot deserts. They're also necessary for those that inhabit the cold deserts of the polar regions, and non-desert areas that suffer from periodic or seasonal droughts. Cacti are among the most drought resistant plants on the planet and are able to store water in their stems and roots. Some can even survive years of drought after a single rainfall.1Detritus recycler (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/DetritivoreDetritus recyclers are the cleaners of the ecosystem, ridding the area of rotting material and recycling energy back into the food chain. They consume the non-living, organic material such as leaf-litter or fragments of dead and decomposing animals. In aquatic ecosystems, detritus is suspended in the water in tiny particles referred to as marine snow, which is often consumed through filter feeding. Fungi and creatures like woodlice are important land detritus recyclers.1Detritus feeder (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/Detritus_feederDetritus feeders consume non-living organic material such as leaf-litter or fragments of dead and decomposing animals. They're the cleaners of the ecosystem, ridding the area of rotting material and recycling energy back into the food chain. In aquatic ecosystems, detritus is suspended in the water in tiny particles referred to as marine snow, which is often consumed through filter feeding.1Sequentially hermaphroditic (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/DichogamySequential hermaphrodites have both male and female sex organs, but they develop and mature at different points in the lifecycle. Most species only change sex once in their development. As a result, these organism still need another individual at the opposite stage for fertilisation. Also known as dichogamy, it's a strategy frequently seen in flowers and fish.1Hierarchical (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/Dominance_hierarchyHierarchical animals have what is known colloquially as a 'pecking order'. Animals at the top of the hierarchy aggressively dominate those lower down the ranks in order to retain privileged access to resources such as food, mates or a safe places to sleep. Males are often likely to dominate a pack, but there are some exceptions, as in spotted hyenas where females outrank males. In other cases there may be an alpha female in addition to an alpha male, as in wolves where she is the only one that will bear pups.1Air plant (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/EpiphyteAir plants, or epiphytes, complete part or all of their life cycle anchored or perched on another plant or structure rather than rooted in the soil. They obtain water and nutrients from dew, air moisture, rainwater and collected plant debris via adventitious (growing from the stem or leaf) and aerial roots. Epiphytes include many lichens and mosses, as well as 10% of all seed plants and ferns and over half the orchid species. This way of life isn't parasitic, in contrast to plants like mistletoe, which 'steals' nutrients from the host tree.1Able to aestivate (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/EstivationAestivation is a period of deep and prolonged sleep, or torpor, that occurs in the summer or dry season in response to heat and drought. Food can often be scarce at such times, so animals avoid using up hard won energy reserves by lowering their metabolic rate. This reduces the need for food and water during hard times, ensuring longer-term survival.1Eusocial (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/EusocialityEusocial describes species with a very highly developed social structure. Ants and termites are all eusocial, as are some species of bee and wasp and a few very unusual mammals. Eusocial animals live in colonies in a strict caste system. The queen and her consort are the only members of the colony that breed and the majority of offspring become workers and soldiers who gather food, protect the colony and raise the young on the queen's behalf.1Fire tolerant (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/Fire_ecologyFire adapted organisms benefit in some way from the occurrence of bush or forest fires. Birds of prey might catch insects fleeing from the flames and Temminck's coursers lay their eggs on scorched ground to take advantage of the open space and to feed on the insects that perished in the fire. Certain plants have gone one step further and become totally dependent on heat and flames to open their seed capsules or trigger germination.1Adapted to flying (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/FlightFlying, in its true sense, is the ability to move through the air under your own power and has evolved in different groups of animals. Flight is a very energy demanding method of locomotion compared to walking. Some species, such as the peregrine falcon, are extraordinarily well adapted to flying. Others, like the albatross, look like they shouldn't be airborne at all, but are in fact fantastically efficient flyers. In spite of their name, flying squirrels and flying lizards don't fly, but glide.1Flowering (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/FlowerFlowering is definitely the most successful plant reproductive strategy and has opened up nearly every habitat on Earth for colonisation. Usually brought on by a change in temperature or daylight, flowering is the reproductive stage of a plant's life cycle. Flowers are designed to encourage the transfer of male pollen to female ovule, and the subsequent production of seed-bearing fruit. A remarkable variety of methods is used to attract insects, birds and even bats: from nutritious nectar to bright colours and scents - not all of which are pleasant. Less showy flowers are serviced by the wind.1Fossorial (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/FossorialFossorial animals live underground and for a variety of reasons: amongst others to feed on soil flora and fauna, to avoid predators, or to hide away from the extremes of climate that exist above ground. So, a British mole avoids the worst of the winter cold in its tunnels, whilst a naked mole rat in Africa gets protection from the heat. And both have some protection from roaming predators.1Adapted to gliding (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/Gliding_(flight)Gliding is where after an initial leap, animals rely on gravity to get them where they are going. Gliding animals can steer, but they can't ascend on their flight path and don't propel themselves through the air under power. Animals as diverse as fish, squid, marsupials and snakes have all learned to glide, and may have evolved features to help to keep them airborne for longer, such as skin flaps on limbs. Flying snakes glide through muscular contraction.1Chemical tolerant (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/HalotoleranceChemical tolerant describes organisms which can tolerate high concentrations of substances which would be toxic or corrosive to other life. For instance plants that can live in the acidic and low oxygen conditions of peat bogs, flamingos that can tolerate the alkaline waters of soda lakes and brine flies which can live and breed on salt flats.1Tactile sense (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/Haptic_perceptionTactile sense includes the obvious sense of contact with another object, but also incorporates a bird's ability to sense air flow over its wings and a fish's sensitivity to water movements. Some creatures, such as the yapok and the star-nosed mole, have a highly sensitive sense of touch through specialised organs that they use in situations where eyes are of no use.1Acoustic communication (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/Hearing_%28sense%29Acoustic communication is the sending and receiving of messages using sound. Bird song, the roars of lions and the chirping of cicadas are all examples of this. Sometimes the messages are outside the range of human hearing, such as the ultrasonic squeaks of baby rats or the infrasound rumbles of elephants. Most acoustic communication is not language, in the sense that humans use it, although language is one aspect of this adaptation.1Acoustic communication (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/Hearing_(sense)Acoustic communcation is the sending and receiving of messages using sound. Bird song, the roars of lions and the chirping of cicadas are all examples of this. Sometimes the messages are outside the range of human hearing, such as the ultrasonic squeaks of baby rats or the infrasound rumbles of elephants. Most acoustic communication is not language, in the sense that humans use it, although language is one aspect of this adaptation.1Blood sucker (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/HematophagyBlood suckers take a variety of forms, many of them parasitic, from small invertebrates to larger mammals. Specialised features, such as the vampire bat's front teeth or the proboscis of the mosquito, help puncture the skin of their victim and there may also be chemical activity to prevent the victim's blood from clotting and ceasing to flow. Blood is full of nutrients, which makes it an attractive option for an easy meal.1Herbivorous (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/HerbivoreHerbivores are animals that exist mainly on a diet of plants or algae. Some eat a wide range of plants, others are more exclusive and eat only particular types, such as monarch butterfly caterpillars which feed on milkweed and pandas on bamboo. Anatomical and physiological adaptations help some herbivores become specialists, for example, in their tolerance of spiky leaves or an in-built antidote to toxins. Other specialists restrict themselves to certain parts of a plant: hummingbirds feed on nectar and greenfly feed on sap.1Hermaphroditic (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/HermaphroditeHermaphrodites have both male and female sex organs, either throughout their lives (homgamy) or that develop and mature at different points in their life cycle (dichogamy). Most dichogamous species, including many flowers and fish, change sex only once in their development. These organism still need another individual at the opposite stage for fertilisation. Homgamous species may be capable of self-fertilisation, but generally two individuals exchange sex cells and both are fertilised.1Able to hibernate (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/HibernationHibernation is an extended period of deep sleep, or torpor, that allows animals to survive winter extremes. Reducing metabolic rate and lowering body temperature enables survival through cold periods when food is scarce or has little energy value. Hibernating species usually work hard to build up large fat reserves before they bed down, and subsist on this during their torpor. They might wake up at intervals to defecate or top up on food.1Altitude tolerant (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/High_altitudeAltitude tolerant organisms are adapted to living high up where oxygen levels - or carbon dioxide levels in the case of plants - are low. The upper reaches of mountain ranges are also often bitterly cold, or subject to swinging daily extremes in temperatures.1Food storage (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/Hoarding_(animal_behaviour)Food storage is a strategy for getting through hard times when resources are low because of seasonal or other factors. Some store food for only a few hours or days, while others may do it on a seasonal timescale. Many carnivores, such as foxes and leopards, are opportunistic hunters so might stash or bury surplus prey and return to eat it a few days later. Jays and squirrels bury enough nuts to get them through the winter.1Adapted to jumping (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/JumpingSaltatorial describes animals that have evolved to hop or jump efficiently as a way of getting around. Jumping animals, such as gerbils, kangaroos, frogs and grasshoppers, have evolved a long pair of legs with large muscles positioned at the back of their body, for maximum hopping power. The coiled, spring-like tail of the springtail is another jumping mechanism.1Kleptoparasitic (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/KleptoparasitismKleptoparasitic animals are thieves and bandits. They steal food, nest material or other resources from their own species or from another one. Gulls are a famous example - they harass other seabirds such as puffins and kittiwakes into giving up their fish, and even snatch chips from unwary people on many a seafront. Lions and hyenas both steal each other's kills, so both can be considered kleptoparasitic.1Maternal care (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/Maternal_effectMaternal care is where the mother of the offspring provides most or all of the effort needed to protect, feed or raise the young. In egg-laying species, maternal care includes looking after the eggs before the young hatch - for instance a mother crocodile guarding her clutch. In mammals, only the mother can provide the milk that youngsters are dependent on for the first part of their lives, so in many species all the primary care is done by the female, though males may play a part in defending or providing for the female.1Able to metamorphose (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/MetamorphosisMetamorphosis is when a species changes body shape and structure at a particular point in its life cycle, such as when a tadpole turns into a frog. Sometimes, in locusts for example, the juvenile form is quite similar to the adult one. In others, they are radically different, and unrecognisable as the same species. The different forms may even entail a completely new lifestyle or habitat, such as when a ground-bound, leaf-eating caterpillar turns into a long distance flying, nectar-eating butterfly.1Able to mimic (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/MimicryMimicry is when an animal or plant resembles another creature or inanimate object, either for defence or to gain other advantages. Pebble plants try not to be eaten by resembling stones, praying mantises hope to lure prey close by resembling flowers. The mimicking species may smell, sound or behave like the creature or object it is duplicating, not simply look like it. For example one type of firefly mimics the light flashes and pheremones of another in order to catch and eat it.1Monogamous (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/Monogamous_pairing_in_animalsMonogamous animals partner up with a single mate, sometimes for the duration of a breeding season and less commonly over multiple seasons and years. Monogamy has particular advantages, and is often the chosen strategy where young are more vulnerable and require both parents for protection and feeding. In serial monogamy, having different partners each season helps maintain genetic diversity.1Moulting (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/MoultingMoulting is all about renewing your skin, fur or feathers, and occurs in animals for a number of reasons. Some creatures, such as snakes and insects, need to shed their skins in order to grow. Birds moult their feathers at least annually to replace damaged ones, and some species also take the opportunity to change into breeding colours or to turn white in winter for camouflage. Mammals may shed their fur for a thicker winter or thinner summer coat, and again some types may change fur colour with the seasons.1Neotenic (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/NeotenyNeotenic refers to animals that retain juvenile features even when they become adults. The most well-known example is the axolotl, a type of salamander that remains tadpole-like all its life, never losing its gills and never leaving the water to live on land. Neoteny is an important feature in evolution: human beings are neotenous primates and insects might be descended from a neotenous millipede-like ancestor.1Nocturnal (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/NocturnalityNocturnal animals are primarily active at night rather than during daylight hours. There are all sorts of reasons why this behaviour might be a good idea. In hotter places such as the tropics, it's cooler at night. If you're a bat, then your ancestors took to the night skies to avoid competition for resources from birds. And, of course, it's easier to hide from predators under cover of darkness.1Nomadic (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/NomadNomadic animals wander from place to place, using no particular fixed routes - unlike a migration - rather than staying in one tightly defined area. There are boundaries to their wanderings and some species, wolves for example, are still territorial. Often, animals may be nomadic only part of the time, during particular seasons, like badgers, or particular life cycle phase, as with young male lions. Nomadism in these cases has reproductive advantages, allowing males to visit different groups of females and ensure a healthy gene pool.1Egg layer (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/OviparityOviparous animals lay eggs, inside which the young then develop before hatching occurs. Birds, reptiles, amphibians, fish, invertebrates and even some mammals (the monotremes) all lay eggs but they're of very different size and construction. The patterns on bird eggs are produced by glands right at the last moment as the egg is laid. For terrestrial species that lay their eggs on land, a waterproof shell prevents the contents from drying out.1Ovoviviparous (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/OvoviviparityOvoviviparous animals produce eggs inside their body, but then give birth to live young. The eggs hatch out inside the mother and the offspring stay within her for a time. She later gives birth to the them. While they are within her, the young are fed on the yolk of the egg, and not directly from the mother's body. Ovoviviparity is a special type of viviparity. Some fish, amphibians and reptiles reproduce this way, for instance the sand tiger shark.1Pack-hunter (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/Pack_hunterPack-hunting is a type of predation where several members of a species combine their efforts to increase their chance of success in the hunt. Well known pack-hunters are lions, wolves and army ants. Some pack hunters have tactics based on sophisticated teamwork, with each animal playing a specific role. Other pack-huntes are less organised, relying on weight of numbers to overwhelm prey rather than on a planned strategy.1Parasitic (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/ParasitismParasitic organisms have a close relationship with another organism, which they use ultimately to extract food. The process generally harms the host, and may even kill it. Parasites can either live on the surface of the host - like blood sucking fleas - or inside it like tapeworms. There are examples of parasites in both the plant and animal kingdoms and some fairly gruesome fungi.1Parental investment (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/Parental_investmentRearing young occurs where the eggs or offspring require looking after, and cannot just be abandoned to fend for themselves as with many species. Care investment may be made before or after birth and the different roles may be carried out by one or both parents. So, for instance, birds need to incubate their eggs and the mother and father often share this duty. Parenting can last for days, months or years with varying levels of involvement by each parent. Sometimes, cooperative breeding takes place where other members of the family assist the parents in looking after the young.1Parthenogenetic (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/ParthenogenesisParthenogenetic species - for example water fleas - reproduce asexually, without need of a male, mating or pollination. In parthenogentic animals, the offspring are usually all female, and in certain types of whiptail lizards, the entire species is female. Parthenogenesis often happens where there are no males of a species in the vicinity. In some cases, should males make a reappearance, the species can switch back to sexual reproduction. Recently in zoos, komodo dragons were discovered to be capable of this reproductive trick.1Poisonous (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/PoisonPoisonous animals contain or secrete toxins and need to be touched or eaten to contaminate their victim. This is different to venomous animals that actively inject a toxin into their the victim. There's a wide range of often highly complex poisons in the animal and plant kingdoms, all of which are used for defense. These poisons can paralyse, stun, cause tissue death or outright kill their victims. The effects depend on the type and concentration of poison and the amount delivered relative to the size of the victim.1Pollinator (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/PollinatorPollinators carry pollen from plant to plant and, often unwittingly, play a crucial role in plant reproduction. Bees are the most familiar pollinators, but plants attract thousands of different types of animals - using all sorts of alluring strategies: colour, scent, structure - to carry out this ecosystem role. Some of the larger active species include fruit bats, hummingbirds and even lemurs. Without pollinators millions of human beings would starve, as most of our crops depend on them.1Polygynandrous (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/PolygynandryPolygynandrous describes a multi-male, multi-female polygamous mating system, such as that seen in lions and bonobos. Females are usually more numerous than the males and mating occurs only within the group. The advantage of this form of polygamy is greater genetic diversity, less need for males to compete with each other and greater protection for the young.1Polygynous (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/PolygynyPolygynous sexual behaviour is the system in which a single male mates with multiple females, but each female mates with only one male. This usually entails fierce competition between the males during the breeding season. Females invest more heavily in their offspring and all the parental duties fall to the mother. They become much more choosy about their mate as a result, while the males attempt to have as many mates as possible in order to leave a maximum number of offspring. However many males fail to win or impress a female and remain unmated their entire lives.1Polymorphic (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/Polymorphism_(biology)Polymorphic means 'many forms' and polymorphism itself comes in many varieties. A polymorphic species has individuals of notably different appearance living in the same area. So army ants, which have workers that come in different sizes, are polymorphic. So are adders, because they can have a zig-zag pattern or be black in colour. But if the males and females of a species look different, as with peacocks and peahens, it's sexual dimorphism rather than polymorphism.1Precocial (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/PrecocialPrecocial species give birth to young that are active and mobile from the moment of birth or hatching. Wildebeest calves, and many other grazing animals, need to be up and running from the word go, to avoid becoming dinner for nearby predators. Newborn dolphins have to be able to swim immediately. Precocial birds, like ducks and chickens, can often feed themselves as soon as mum shows them what is edible. Offspring that are helpless at birth - humans and mice, for example - are the opposite, altricial.1Predator (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/PredationPredators are creatures that catch and kill other animals for food. All sorts of techniques are employed by different animals to maximise their chance of catching prey, and to balance the energy expended in catching prey with the energy gained in eating it. Some execute long chases, outrunning their prey, others ambush or hunt in groups. Some construct elaborate traps and many have mechanisms for stunning or poisoning their victims.1Trapping predator (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/Predator_trapTrapping predators perform a particular type of ambush that involves constructing something to help them catch their prey before they pounce on it. For example, spiders construct webs and fungus gnats dangle a lure of sticky silk to ensnare other organisms.1Social (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/PresocialitySocial animals like hanging out with members of their own species. But to be truly social, the group of animals isn't just a random collection of individuals. Instead the members recognise each other (by scent or sight) and co-operate with each other in some way - for instance getting together to defend a communal territory.1Cold tolerant (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/PsychrophileCold tolerant organisms have evolved various methods for coping with very low temperatures. Some animals hibernate, take shelter, or even migrate to warmer areas. Others, such as Antarctic seals, have warm fur and a thick layer of blubber for insulation. Arctic plants tend to be small and grow low to the ground and can be coated with hair and wax to avoid wind chill. Some insects, amphibians and microbes can even withstand being frozen solid.1Adapted to running (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/RunningRunning and walking evolved as a method of getting around when life emerged from water on to dry land. Animals that travel about on foot usually have a particular speed of gait which is their most energy efficient. Fast running mammals, such as zebras and cheetahs, have evolved features such as long legs and a flexible spine to boost their speed.1Scavenger (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/ScavengerScavengers are those carnivorous animals that eat carrion (already dead animals) rather than hunting fresh meat for themselves. Some scavengers, such as African vultures, rely wholly on what they can get this way. Others, such as lions or wolves, are opportunistic scavengers and while they won't pass up a free meal, prefer to hunt their own prey. It's a surprise to many that even some herbivorous species, such as hippos and pandas, are known to scavenge carrion now and then.1Seed disperser (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/Seed_dispersalSeed dispersers carry seeds away from the parent plant either deliberately or accidentally. Some, such as ants, squirrels and mice, collect and store seeds (including nuts). If the store is forgotten, or the animal dies, the seeds might germinate. Other animals eat a plant's fruit and scatter the undigested seeds in their dung. Finally, some seeds are sticky or have hooks that catch on to fur and feathers, so the seed can hitch-hike to a new location.1Semelparous (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/Semelparity_and_iteroparitySemelparous organisms reproduce only once in their lives and then die. The most well known ones are Pacific salmon that perish after spawning. Other examples are squid, mayflies and plants which die after setting seed (annuals). The adult diverts resources into producing huge amounts of offspring to ensure sufficient numbers reach maturity without any parental care. This is why bears largely ignore dead salmon after they've spawned - all the salmon's fat has gone into producing sperm and eggs and little nutrional value is left.1Chemical communication (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/SemiochemicalChemical communication is all about taste and smell. Plants use scent and pheromones to attract pollinators. Animals use scents and tastes for a whole variety of reasons, including scents emitted by female moths to attract a mate, alarm signals given off by bees when their hive is under threat and the territorial markers in wolf urine. Some insects, such as ants, lay down pheromone trails for their nest-mates to follow to food sources. Many animals have special scent glands for leaving these chemical messages.1Sessile (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/Sessility_(zoology)Sessile describes animals that don't move around, such as barnacles and corals. There may be mobile phases in the life cycle, often in the larval stage, where organisms might actively swim or merely drift about, but they will eventually fix themselves in place and remain there for the rest of their lives. Because sessile animals can't go off in search of food, this is only a practical lifestyle if you live in water, where the currents or tides will carry food particles to you.1Sexually dimorphic (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/Sexual_dimorphismSexually dimorphic describes animals where there is a physical differences between males and females of the same species (other than in the sex organs). One may be significantly larger than the other, colouration may be different or one might have additional body parts such as antlers, ornate plumage or a mane. In the rarer cases where females are larger or more ornate it is termed reverse sexual dimorphism.1Spawning (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/Spawn_%28biology%29Spawning animals deposit a mass of eggs and sperm in water, where they meet and are fertilised. Even when the male and female animals are in close proximity, such as a male frog grasping the female, the eggs are fertilised outside the female's body. Some animals, such as coral and many fish, synchronise their spawning so that millions of eggs are released at once in often quite impressive events.1Spawning (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/Spawn_(biology)Spawning animals deposit a mass of eggs and sperm in water, where they meet and are fertilised. Even when the male and female animals are in close proximity, such as a male frog grasping the female, the eggs are fertilised outside the female's body. Some animals, such as coral and many fish, synchronise their spawning so that millions of eggs are released at once in often quite impressive events.1Swarming (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/SwarmSwarming happens when animals gather or travel together in large numbers. Its most familiar examples are in insects, such as locusts and midges, flocking birds and shoaling fish. Some animals swarm as a defence against predation, others, such as locusts and bees, only form swarms in specific circumstances. Swarming can be carried out by the smallest and simplest micro-organisms, such as bacteria, and even by humans.1Symbiotic (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/SymbiosisSymbiosis is a relationship between two organisms that's beneficial to one (commensal) or both (true symbiote). For instance, giant clams have algae living within them. They each recycle the other's waste products and supply their partner with nutrients. Symbiosis can exist between different kinds of organism, such as between plants and fungi or plants and animals, as well as between different species.1Territorial (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/Territory_%28animal%29Territorial animals actively defend the area in which they live and more importantly on which they depend for resources. If the animal doesn't advertise its ownership and defend it from members of its own species, it isn't territorial. Often, advertising takes the form of scent marking the territory boundaries as a clear marker for others to stay away. Challenges and disputes can be resolved in a number of ways, not always violently. In addition to these 'traditional' territories, the males of some non-territorial species - such as wildebeest - establish temporary mini-territories in the mating season to impress the females.1Territorial (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/Territory_(animal)Territorial animals actively defend the area in which they live and more importantly on which they depend for resources. If the animal doesn't advertise its ownership and defend it from members of its own species, it isn't territorial. Often, advertising takes the form of scent marking the territory boundaries as a clear marker for others to stay away. Challenges and disputes can be resolved in a number of ways, not always violently. In addition to these 'traditional' territories, the males of some non-territorial species - such as wildebeest - establish temporary mini-territories in the mating season to impress the females.1Heat tolerant (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/ThermophileHeat tolerant animals and plants have special adaptations for survival in hot places. Many animals try to avoid the heat by hiding away during the hottest parts of the day in burrows and dens. Others have physical adaptations that help body heat dissipate, such as large ears. To avoid being scorched, plants may turn their leaves away from the sun's glare. Small waxy leaves and the ability to close pores help other plants to reduce water loss.1Tool use (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/Tool_use_by_animalsTool use was once thought to be a strictly human behaviour, but it is now known that many kinds of animals use tools. These include crows, dolphins and - of course - primates such as chimpanzees. Some animals, sea otters for one, have a favourite tool that they carry about with them. Others find nearby articles such as stones, twigs or thorns, which they use and then discard. Advanced use comes about when tools are used in combination, as when chimps use both a hammer and an anvil to crack kernels.1Capable of torpor (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/TorporTorpor is a form of sleep that helps animals conserve valuable resources in times of stress, such as in cold or very hot, dry weather. Body temperature drops and the heart and metabolic rates slow down so that less energy is needed to stay alive. Animals can stay torpid for short bursts, or go into long-term torpor lasting weeks or months, known as hibernation (winter) or aestivation (summer). Animals in torpor are far more difficult to wake up than animals in normal sleep.1Troglophilic (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/TroglobiteTroglophilic or cave dwelling animals spend their whole lives in cave systems. Living in perpetual darkness, many cave species have lost the sight that their evolutionary ancestors had and become blind. Vestigial eyes can often be seen. They're also usually pale in colour as they don't need to produce skin pigment as camouflage or protection from the sun.1Adapted for ultrasound (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/UltrasoundUltrasound is high frequency sound that's above the range of human hearing. Some animals produce ultrasound for communication or for navigation. Baby rats call to their mothers with high pitched squeaks inaudible to humans. Dolphins use ultrasound to echolocate and find their way around in murky or dark water.1Venomous (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/VenomVenomous organisms inflict poisonous wounds by actively biting, stinging or scratching their victims and injecting toxins into them. This distinguishes them from poisonous species which usually contain or secrete toxins and need to touched or eaten to contaminate their victims. Envenomation can be a predatory tactic or a defence mechanism. It can be costly to produce and to inject toxins, so often organisms will use as little venom as possible in an attack.1Visual communication (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/Visual_perceptionVisual communication transmits information to others through shape, colour and movement or body language. Animals can both send and decode visual messages, using colour and behavioural displays for messages as varied as threat, invitations to mate and identification of what species they are. Though plants can't themselves see, they use visual cues such as colour to attract animals to their flowers and fruits. Visual perception differs radically among various groups of animals, from the ability to see in low light, to detection of the slightest movement.1Viviparous (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/adaptations/ViviparyViviparous animals bear live young that have developed inside the mother's body. Most familiar to us in mammals, there are a few unexpected ocurrences in animal groups usually associated with egg-laying such as reptiles, amphibians, fish and scorpions. The term can also be applied to some plants, such as certain kinds of succulents and waterlilies, where the seeds germinate while still attached to the parent.1Science & Nature - Animalshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animalsFrom birds to sealife and mammals - explore the living planet.1Science & Nature - Conservationhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/conservationA look at the plight of animals listed as endangered. Including current status, links, conservation measures and further reading.1Conservation - Bearshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/conservation/bearsA look at the plight of bears listed as endangered. Including current status, links, conservation measures and further reading.1Conservation - Bearshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/conservation/bears/intro.shtmlInformation on the status of bears in the wild, including a summary of the main threats to their survival.1Conservation - Bearshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/conservation/bears/what.shtmlA starting point for people who want to help with bear conservation1Conservation - Catshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/conservation/catsA look at the plight of cat species listed as endangered. Including current status, links, conservation measures and further reading.1Conservation - Catshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/conservation/cats/intro.shtmlThe plight of endangered cats, including the puma, tiger and lynx. Their status and threats to their survival.1Conservation - Catshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/conservation/cats/what.shtmlA starting point for people who want to help with cat conservation1Whales and dolphinshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/conservation/cetaceansA look at the plight of whales dolphins and porpoises listed as endangered. Including current status, links, conservation measures and further reading.1Whales and dolphinshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/conservation/cetaceans/intro.shtmlInformation on the status of whales, dolphins and porpoises in the wild, including a summary of the main threats to their survival.1Whales and dolphinshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/conservation/cetaceans/what.shtmlA starting point for people who want to help with whale and dolphin conservation1Conservation - Elephantshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/conservation/elephantsA look at the plight of endangered elephants. Including current status, links, conservation measures and further reading.1Conservation - Elephantshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/conservation/elephants/intro.shtmlInformation on the status of elephants in the wild, including a summary of the main threats to their survival.1Conservation - Elephantshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/conservation/elephants/what.shtmlA starting point for people who want to help with elephant conservation1Conservation - Primateshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/conservation/primatesA look at the plight of primates listed as endangered. Including current status, links, conservation measures and further reading.1Conservation - Primateshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/conservation/primates/intro.shtmlFacts and figures about the plight of primates in the wild. Their status and threats to their survival.1Conservation - Primateshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/conservation/primates/what.shtmlA starting point for people who want to help with primate conservation1Conservation - Rhinoshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/conservation/rhinosA look at the plight of endangered rhinos. Including current status, links, conservation measures and further reading.1Conservation - Rhinoshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/conservation/rhinos/intro.shtmlInformation on the status of rhinos in the wild, including a summary of the main threats to their survival.1Conservation - Rhinoshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/conservation/rhinos/what.shtmlA starting point for people who want to help with rhino conservation1Conservation - Sharkshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/conservation/sharksA look at the plight of endangered sharks. Including current status, links, conservation measures and further reading.1Wildlife Finderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/conservation/sharks/intro.shtmlinsert_description1Conservation - Sharkshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/conservation/sharks/what.shtmlA starting point for people who want to help with shark conservation1Marine Turtleshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/conservation/turtlesA look at the plight of endangered marine turtles. Including current status, links, conservation measures and further reading.1Marine Turtleshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/conservation/turtles/intro.shtmlInformation on the status of marine turtles in the wild, including a summary of the main threats to their survival.1Marine Turtleshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/conservation/turtles/what.shtmlA starting point for people who want to help with marine turtle conservation1Conservation - Wolveshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/conservation/wolvesA look at the plight of endangered wolves. Including current status, links, conservation measures and further reading.1Conservation - Wolveshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/conservation/wolves/intro.shtmlInformation on the status of wolves in the wild, including a summary of the main threats to their survival.1Conservation - Wolveshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/conservation/wolves/what.shtmlA starting point for people who want to help with wolf conservation1Science & Nature - Petshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/petsEverything you need to know about your pets1Animal memorialshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/animal_memorials.shtmlExplore the origins of some of Britain's spectacular monuments and cemeteries1<url>http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/antics.shtml</url><description>No description available</description><color>1</color><sources/></node><node><title>Pets - Articleshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/articles.shtmlEverything you need to know about your pets1Pets - Budgerigarshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/budgerigars.shtmlBudgerigar fact file1Pets - Catshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/cats.shtmlCat fact file1Pets - Dogshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/dogs.shtmlCat fact file1Exotic petshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/exotic.shtmlThinking of getting an unusual pet? Read this first...1Fact fileshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/factfiles.shtmlEverything you need to know about your pets1Pets - Ferretshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/ferret.shtmlCat fact file1Pets - Goldfishhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/goldfish.shtmlGoldfish fact file1Guinea pighttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/guinea_pig.shtmlGuinea pig fact file1Pets - Hamstershttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/hamsters.shtmlhamster fact file1<url>http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/horses.shtml</url><description>No description available</description><color>1</color><sources/></node><node><title>Lost and Foundhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/lost_found.shtmlTips on how to prevent losing the family pet, and who to contact if you do1Pets - Micehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/mice.shtmlmice fact file1Pets - Parrotshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/parrots.shtmlParrot fact file1Pet Travel Schemehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/pet_travel.shtmlFind out how pet passports could allow you and your pet to travel more freely.1Pets - Rabbitshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/rabbits.shtmlrabbit pig fact file1Pets - Ratshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/rats.shtmlRat fact file1Wild at hearthttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/responsible.shtmlResponsible cat ownership1Test Your Pet http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/testyourpet1Test Your Pet http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/testyourpet/cat_breed_results.shtmlTest Your Pet survey results1Test Your Pet http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/testyourpet/dog_breed_results1.shtmlTest Your Pet survey results1Test Your Pet http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/testyourpet/dog_breed_results2.shtmlTest Your Pet survey results1Test Your Pet http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/testyourpet/external_links.shtmlA summary of useful links for pet owners in the UK: clubs, societies, charities and information.1Test Your Pet http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/testyourpet/flat_alternative.shtml1Test Your Pet http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/testyourpet/handedness_results.shtmlTest Your Pet survey results1Test Your Pet http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/testyourpet/more_tests.shtmlBBC Test Your Pet - the UK's biggest survey of pet owners and their companions' abilities...1Test Your Pet Owner Surveyhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/testyourpet/new_owner.shtml1Test Your Pet http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/testyourpet/overall_results.shtmlTest Your Pet survey results1Test Your Pet http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/testyourpet/pet_tv_results.shtmlTest Your Pet - Pet TV results1Test Your Pet http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/testyourpet/science.shtmlDiscover the science behind Test Your Pet1Test Your Pet http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/testyourpet/survey_results.shtmlTest Your Pet survey results1Test Your Pet http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/testyourpet/tests/static/bird_1.shtml1Test Your Pet http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/testyourpet/tests/static/bird_4.shtml1Test Your Pet http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/testyourpet/tests/static/bird_5.shtml1Test Your Pet http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/testyourpet/tests/static/bird_6.shtml1Test Your Pet http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/testyourpet/tests/static/cat_3.shtml1Test Your Pet http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/testyourpet/tests/static/cat_4.shtml1Test Your Pet http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/testyourpet/tests/static/cat_5.shtml1Test Your Pet http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/testyourpet/tests/static/cat_6.shtml1Test Your Pet http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/testyourpet/tests/static/dog_4.shtml1Test Your Pet http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/testyourpet/tests/static/dog_5.shtml1Test Your Pet http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/testyourpet/tests/static/dog_6.shtml1Test Your Pet http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/testyourpet/tests/static/fish_1.shtml1Test Your Pet http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/testyourpet/tests/static/horse_2.shtml1Test Your Pet http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/testyourpet/tests/static/horse_3.shtml1Test Your Pet http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/testyourpet/tests/static/horse_4.shtml1Test Your Pet http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/testyourpet/tests/static/horse_5.shtml1Test Your Pet http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/testyourpet/tests/static/horse_6.shtml1Test Your Pet http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/testyourpet/tests/static/smallfurry_4.shtml1Test Your Pet http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/testyourpet/tests/static/smallfurry_5.shtml1Test Your Pet http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/testyourpet/tests/static/smallfurry_6.shtml1Test Your Pet http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/testyourpet/test_results.shtmlTest Your Pet test results1Test Your Pet http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/testyourpet/tv_details.shtmlBBC Test Your Pet - the UK's biggest survey of pet owners and their companions' abilities...1Pets - Zoophobiashttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/pets/zoophobias.shtmlWhat happens when fear of animals turns to phobia?1Planet Earthhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/planetearthAn interactive journey around the planet brings stunning video and images to your desktop. UK viewers can enjoy clips from Planet Earth and other natural history series.1Planet Earth for non-UK users http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/planetearth/flashapp1Planet Earth for non-UK users http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/planetearth/flashapp/flashvideo.shtml1Planet Earth for non-UK users http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/planetearth/flashapp/help.shtml1Planet Earth for non-UK users http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/planetearth/hd1Planet Earth for non-UK users http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/planetearth/hd/instructions.shtml1Planet Earth for non-UK users http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/planetearth/realmedia1Planet Earth screensaverhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/planetearth/screensaversDownload a series of classic images from the Planet Earth TV series to enhance your desktop1UK Wildlifehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/wildbritainAn interactive field guide to UK wildlife. Learn how to identify animals and plants and find out about nature near you.1Field guideshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/wildbritain/field_guidesSimple wildlife spotting tips. Find out how to identify animal tracks, look at some animal homes and feeding signs, and learn how to identify trees in winter from their buds.1Animal homes field guidehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/wildbritain/field_guides/animal_homes.shtmlFind out how to recognise some animal homes. Look at a badger sett, a rabbit warren, an otter holt and a water vole's riverbank home.1Animal tracks field guidehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/wildbritain/field_guides/animal_tracks.shtmlFind out how to identify animals by looking at their tracks.1Droppings field guidehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/wildbritain/field_guides/droppings.shtmlFind out how to recognise animal droppings.1Wildlife Finderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/wildbritain/field_guides/feeding_signs.shtmlinsert_description1Nest identification field guidehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/wildbritain/field_guides/nest_id.shtmlFind out how to tell whether the nest you've spotted belongs to a crow, a magpie or a rook.1Trees in winter field guidehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/wildbritain/field_guides/tree_id.shtmlFind out how to identify trees in winter by looking at their buds.1Garden wildlifehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/wildbritain/gardenwildlifeMake a difference for garden wildlife. Find out how you can create space for nature living in your back yard.1Garden wildlifehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/wildbritain/gardenwildlife/myspaceMake your patch wildlife-friendly with practical ideas tailored to your space or browse the full list of 'how to' guides1Garden wildlifehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/wildbritain/gardenwildlife/toptips.shtmlWidllife garden top tips - quick and easy things to do in the garden to attract wildlife from planting bulbs to feeding the birds.1Look aroundhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/wildbritain/look_aroundTake a look through the wildlife windows and see just how much you know about Wild Britain.1Look around birdshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/wildbritain/look_around/birdsTake a look through the wildlife windows and see just how much you know about Wild Britain.1Look around birdshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/wildbritain/look_around/birds/1b.shtmlListen to some garden birds sing and learn how to identify them.1Look around birdshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/wildbritain/look_around/birds/2a.shtmlTake a look through the wildlife windows and see just how much you know about Wild Britain.1Look around birdshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/wildbritain/look_around/birds/3a.shtmlLearn how to tell the difference between the corvids of Wild Britain.1Look around insectshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/wildbritain/look_around/insectsTake a look through the wildlife windows and see just how much you know about Wild Britain.1Look around insectshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/wildbritain/look_around/insects/1b.shtmlTake a look through the wildlife windows and see just how much you know about Wild Britain.1Look around insectshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/wildbritain/look_around/insects/2a.shtmlTake a look through the wildlife windows and see just how much you know about Wild Britain.1Look around insectshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/wildbritain/look_around/insects/3a.shtmlTake a look through the wildlife windows and see just how much you know about Wild Britain.1Look around insectshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/wildbritain/look_around/insects/4a.shtmlFind out more about amazing insect adaptations.1Look around insectshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/wildbritain/look_around/insects/5a.shtmlTake a look through the wildlife windows and see just how much you know about Wild Britain.1Look around mammalshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/wildbritain/look_around/mammalsTake a look through the wildlife windows and see just how much you know about Wild Britain.1Look around - Mammalshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/wildbritain/look_around/mammals/1b.shtmlTake a look through the wildlife windows and see just how much you know about Wild Britain.1Look around mammalshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/wildbritain/look_around/mammals/2a.shtmlAm I native? Learn when and where to spot some British mammals.1Look around mammalshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/wildbritain/look_around/mammals/3a.shtmlTest yourself in the Wild Britain mammals quizzes.1Look around plantshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/wildbritain/look_around/plantsTake a look through the wildlife windows and see just how much you know about Wild Britain.1Look around plantshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/wildbritain/look_around/plants/1b.shtmlLearn how to identify British plants.1Look around plantshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/wildbritain/look_around/plants/2a.shtmlLearn how to identify plants.1Look around plantshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/wildbritain/look_around/plants/3a.shtmlTake a look at some British habitats and learn about the plant life found there.1Look around farmland plantshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/wildbritain/look_around/plants/farmland.shtmlTake a look through the wildlife windows and see just how much you know about Wild Britain.1Look around freshwater plantshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/wildbritain/look_around/plants/freshwater.shtmlTake a look through the wildlife windows and see just how much you know about Wild Britain.1Look around grassland plantshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/wildbritain/look_around/plants/grassland.shtmlExplore grassland plants then look at some plants you can find in other British habitats.1Look around mountain plantshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/wildbritain/look_around/plants/mountain.shtmlExplore mountain plants then look at some plants you can find in other British habitats.1Look around woodland plantshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/wildbritain/look_around/plants/woodland.shtmlExplore woodland plants then look at some plants you can find in other British habitats.1Nature near youhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/wildbritain/nature_near_youFind out more about the wildlife on your doorstep and outdoor activities near you.1Nature near youhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/wildbritain/nature_near_you/search.shtmlFind out more about the wildlife on your doorstep and outdoor activities near you.1Nature near youhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/wildbritain/nature_near_you/txtversion.shtmlFind out more about the wildlife on your doorstep and outdoor activities near you.1Sea Lifehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanetA comprehensive introduction to life in the sea and the forces of nature that regulate the oceans.1Alien Planethttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/alienThe Blue Planet Alien Planet Challenge from BBC Nature Online1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/alien/further.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/alien/further_closer1.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/alien/further_closer2.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/alien/further_link1.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/alien/further_link2.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/alien/further_link3.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/alien/further_link4.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/alien/further_links.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/alien/further_mine.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/alien/further_overfish.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/alien/further_pollution.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/alien/further_space.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/alien/further_you.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/alien/master.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1The Blue Planethttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/blueThe Blue Planet Challenge from BBCi Nature1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/blue/further.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/blue/future.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/blue/human.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/blue/links.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/blue/living_under.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/blue/world_oceans.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/blue/zones.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/books.shtmlBBC - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/challenge.shtmlTake part in the Blue Planet Challenge! Play games and experience the secrets of the deep1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/children.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/east_anglia.shtmlBBC - Nature - Blue Planet1On the Edgehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/edgeThe Blue Planet On the Edge Challenge from BBC Nature Online1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/edge/further_altitude.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/edge/further_armour_plated.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/edge/further_dunes.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/edge/further_landsea.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/edge/further_links.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/edge/further_rockpool.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/edge/further_wetlands.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/edge/master.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Ends of the Earthhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/endsThe Blue Planet Ends of the Earth Challenge from BBCi Nature1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/ends/explore.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/ends/further_experiments.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/ends/further_links.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/ends/further_mark.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/ends/master.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Fact fileshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/factfiles.shtmlA completed index linking to all the marine animals featured in the BBC Blue Planet Challenge.1Fact fileshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/factfiles/birdsNo description available1Fact files: Arctic ternhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/factfiles/birds/arctic_tern_bg.shtmlThe Arctic tern migrates an astonishing distance - further than any other bird. It spends April-September in the Arctic where it breeds, before travelling some 12,000 km (7,500 miles) to Antarctica to enjoy a second summer in the south.1Fact fileshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/factfiles/fishNo description available1Fact files: Atlantic salmon http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/factfiles/fish/salmon_bg.shtmlAn historically important food fish, it was given rights of protection in the Magna Carta of 1216. Now popular in aquaculture, it gains its name from its ability to leap up waterfalls in its quest to spawn.1Fact fileshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/factfiles/molluscsNo description available1Fact files: Common limpethttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/factfiles/molluscs/limpet_bg.shtmlLimpets are a familiar feature of rocky shores. They can be found clinging to hard surfaces, forming characteristic indentations known as scars. They are keystone species are important in keeping algal levels under control.1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/guide.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Ocean infohttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/infobursts.shtmlFind out how the oceans function and explore other marine phenomena.1Ocean info - Seaweedhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/infobursts/seaweed_bg.shtmlDescription of seaweed biology.1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/learn_more.shtmlBBC - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/linked_organ.shtmlBBC - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/london.shtmlBBC - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/midlands.shtmlBBC - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/northern_ireland.shtmlBBC - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/north_east.shtmlBBC - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/north_west.shtmlBBC - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/sailing.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/scotland.shtmlBBC - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/scuba.shtmlBBC - Nature - Blue Planet1Four Seasonshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/seasonsThe Blue Planet Four Seasons Challenge from BBCi Nature1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/seasons/explore.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/seasons/further_kelp_uk.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/seasons/further_marine_links.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/seasons/further_otters_links.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/seasons/further_otters_uk.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/seasons/further_seasons.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/seasons/further_whale_africa.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/seasons/further_whale_asia.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/seasons/further_whale_caribbean.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/seasons/further_whale_euro.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/seasons/further_whale_namerica.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/seasons/further_whale_oznz.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/seasons/further_whale_samerica.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/seasons/master.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/south_west.shtmlBBC - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/teachers1.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/teachers2.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/teachers3.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Travel the Worldhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/travelThe Blue Planet Travel the World Challenge from BBCi Nature1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/travel/further.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/travel/further_1.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/travel/further_2.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/travel/further_3.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/travel/further_4.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/travel/further_bird.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/travel/further_global.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/travel/further_research.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/travel/further_sailing.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/travel/further_salmon.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/travel/further_shark.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/travel/further_tracking.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/travel/further_turtle.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/travel/further_whale.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/travel/master.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/wales.shtmlBBC - Nature - Blue Planet1Webs of Lifehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/websThe Blue Planet Webs of Life Challenge from BBCi Nature1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/webs/explore.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/webs/further.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/webs/further_artreef.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/webs/further_dive.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/webs/further_forest.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/webs/further_links.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/webs/further_threats.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/webs/further_threats1.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/webs/further_threats2.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/webs/further_threats3.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/webs/further_threats4.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/webs/further_threats5.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/webs/further_threats6.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Blue Planet Challengehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/blueplanet/webs/master.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Blue Planet1Wildlife Finder - Classeshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/classA class is a scientific way to group related organisms together, some examples of classes being jellyfish, reptiles and sea urchins. Classes are big groups and contain within them smaller groupings called orders, families, genera and species.1Ray-finned fishes (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/ActinopterygiiRay-finned fishes are a very diverse class, about half of all vertebrates being ray-fins. They get their name from the form of their fins - bony struts with a web of skin covering them. Familiar fish such as the goldfish, cod and seahorse are all members of this class.1Amphibians (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/AmphibianAmphibians include frogs, salamanders and caecilians. A typical amphibian has a larval stage spent in water during which it breathes through gills, and an adult stage that is less tied to water when they rely on lungs. However, there are some species that skip the tadpole stage and others that keep their gills throughout their life.1Wildlife Finderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Amphibian/by/rankinsert_description1All Amphibianshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Amphibian/by/rank/allNo description available1Corals and sea anemones (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/AnthozoaCorals and sea anemones are related to jellyfish. They live fixed to the seabed instead of swimming free. Sea anemones usually live as single animals in isolation, whilst most corals live in colonies - formed when new polyps bud off the initial founder. Hard corals build a limestone skeleton so that as nearby colonies expand and grow a reef is formed. Both corals and sea anemones catch their prey with stinging tentacles. Sea anemones are able to catch larger prey than corals can.1Wildlife Finderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Anthozoa/by/rankWatch the most amazing animals in the world. Explore the BBC's natural history archive.1All Corals and sea anemones (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Anthozoa/by/rank/allNo description available1Arachnid (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/ArachnidNo description available1Wildlife Finderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Arachnid/by/rankWatch the most amazing animals in the world. Explore the BBC's natural history archive.1All Spiders, mites and allies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Arachnid/by/rank/allNo description available1Birds (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/BirdBirds are a class of vertebrates. They are bipedal, warm-blooded, have a covering of feathers, and their front limbs are modified into wings. Some birds, such as penguins and ostriches, have lost the power of flight. All birds lay eggs. Because birds are warm-blooded, their eggs have to be incubated to keep the embryos inside warm, or they will perish.1<url>http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Birdweeklyfeature/notjustaprettyface</url><description>No description available</description><color>1</color><sources/></node><node><title/><url>http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Birdweeklyfeature/olderthanus</url><description>No description available</description><color>1</color><sources/></node><node><title/><url>http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Birdweeklyfeature/spaceinvaders</url><description>No description available</description><color>1</color><sources/></node><node><title>Cephalopods (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/CephalopodThe cephalopods are a class of molluscs. Members include octopuses, squids, cuttlefish, nautiluses and the fossil ammonites. They are characterised by a ring of tentacles around their mouth, and swim using a form of jet propulsion by squirting water out of their body. All cephalopods are carnivorous.1Cartilaginous fishes (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/ChondrichthyesThe cartilaginous fish are so named because their skeleton is composed of cartilage which is not reinforced by the minerals that make bone. These minerals are only present in their teeth and skin. The class includes the sharks, sawfish, rays and chimaeras. The majority of them are marine, though a few do venture into brackish and freshwater.1Dicotyledons (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/DicotyledonDicotyledons (or magnoliopsida) are a class of flowering plants. They earn their name from the fact that the first leaves formed as their seedlings germinate - the cotyledons - come as a pair. These first leaves are often different in form to the leaves formed later. Dicotyledons include plants as diverse as roses, fig trees and water lilies.1Insects (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/InsectThe insects are one of the most successful types of living organism, with roughly half of all species on Earth being insects. Insects are part of the Arthropod phylum, and as such have an external skeleton and jointed limbs. All insects have six legs, and are the only type of invertebrate which has evolved the ability to fly.1Jellyfish (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/JellyfishJellyfish, sometimes known as true jellyfish, are a class of cnidarians found in every ocean of the world from the surface to the seabed. Most are free-swimming, but some are sessile and grow fixed to the seabed. Because jellyfish can't swim against a current, they are classed as planktonic animals - even when they're the size of the huge lion's mane jellyfish, which can grow to over 35m long. Box jellyfish and the Portuguese man o'war are not true jellyfish, although they are related to them.1Lobsters, woodlice and allies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/MalacostracaLobsters, woodlice and their allies form a very large class that contains two thirds of the world's crustaceans. This includes all the prawns, crabs and crayfish that people eat. However, they aren't all marine creatures. Some members, such as the woodlice and land crabs, live on land for all or part of their life.1Mammals (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/MammalMammals are a class of vertebrates characterised by warm-blood, hairy bodies, a four-chambered heart, a single jaw bone, sweat glands and - in females - mammary glands for suckling young. Some mammals, such as naked mole rats and whales have lost some or all of their hair. Almost all mammals give birth to live young, but there are a few that lay eggs. These are known as monotremes, and include the platypus.1<url>http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Mammalquiz_more/postcards</url><description>No description available</description><color>1</color><sources/></node><node><title/><url>http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Mammalquiz_more/survey</url><description>No description available</description><color>1</color><sources/></node><node><title>Wildlife Finderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Mammalup_close/picpops/120.shtmlWatch the most amazing animals in the world. Explore the BBC's natural history archive.1Wildlife Finderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Mammalup_close/picpops/136.shtmlWatch the most amazing animals in the world. Explore the BBC's natural history archive.1Wildlife Finderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Mammalup_close/picpops/137.shtmlWatch the most amazing animals in the world. Explore the BBC's natural history archive.1Wildlife Finderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Mammalup_close/picpops/140.shtmlWatch the most amazing animals in the world. Explore the BBC's natural history archive.1Wildlife Finderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Mammalup_close/picpops/141.shtmlWatch the most amazing animals in the world. Explore the BBC's natural history archive.1Wildlife Finderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Mammalup_close/picpops/142.shtmlWatch the most amazing animals in the world. Explore the BBC's natural history archive.1Wildlife Finderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Mammalup_close/picpops/158.shtmlWatch the most amazing animals in the world. Explore the BBC's natural history archive.1Wildlife Finderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Mammalup_close/picpops/16.shtmlWatch the most amazing animals in the world. Explore the BBC's natural history archive.1Wildlife Finderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Mammalup_close/picpops/160.shtmlWatch the most amazing animals in the world. Explore the BBC's natural history archive.1Wildlife Finderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Mammalup_close/picpops/3.shtmlWatch the most amazing animals in the world. Explore the BBC's natural history archive.1Wildlife Finderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Mammalup_close/picpops/30.shtmlWatch the most amazing animals in the world. Explore the BBC's natural history archive.1Wildlife Finderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Mammalup_close/picpops/31.shtmlWatch the most amazing animals in the world. Explore the BBC's natural history archive.1Wildlife Finderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Mammalup_close/picpops/91.shtmlWatch the most amazing animals in the world. Explore the BBC's natural history archive.1Wildlife Finderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Mammalup_close/picpops/93.shtmlWatch the most amazing animals in the world. Explore the BBC's natural history archive.1Wildlife Finderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Mammalup_close/picpops/96.shtmlWatch the most amazing animals in the world. Explore the BBC's natural history archive.1Wildlife Finderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Mammalup_close/transcript/bear_trans_diet2.shtmlWatch the most amazing animals in the world. Explore the BBC's natural history archive.1Wildlife Finderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Mammalup_close/transcript/bear_trans_habitat.shtmlWatch the most amazing animals in the world. Explore the BBC's natural history archive.1Wildlife Finderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Mammalup_close/transcript/bear_trans_overview.shtmlWatch the most amazing animals in the world. Explore the BBC's natural history archive.1Wildlife Finderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Mammalup_close/transcript/bear_trans_social.shtmlWatch the most amazing animals in the world. Explore the BBC's natural history archive.1Wildlife Finderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Mammalup_close/transcript/buffalo_trans_overview2.shtmlWatch the most amazing animals in the world. Explore the BBC's natural history archive.1Wildlife Finderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Mammalup_close/transcript/chimp_trans_social.shtmlWatch the most amazing animals in the world. Explore the BBC's natural history archive.1Wildlife Finderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Mammalup_close/transcript/molerat_trans_diet.shtmlWatch the most amazing animals in the world. Explore the BBC's natural history archive.1Wildlife Finderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Mammalup_close/transcript/molerat_trans_habitat.shtmlWatch the most amazing animals in the world. Explore the BBC's natural history archive.1Wildlife Finderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Mammalup_close/transcript/molerat_trans_overview.shtmlWatch the most amazing animals in the world. Explore the BBC's natural history archive.1Wildlife Finderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Mammalup_close/wildfacts/facts_dolphin.shtmlWatch the most amazing animals in the world. Explore the BBC's natural history archive.1Wildlife Finderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Mammalup_close/wildfacts/facts_molerat.shtmlWatch the most amazing animals in the world. Explore the BBC's natural history archive.1Barnacles, copepods and allies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/MaxillopodaBarnacles and their relatives are all crustaceans, with the copepods and ostracods (seed shrimps) being the most numerous species. Most are tiny - only a millimeter or so in size. Some have adopted a parasitic way of life.1Wildlife Finderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Maxillopoda/by/rankWatch the most amazing animals in the world. Explore the BBC's natural history archive.1All Barnacles, copepods and allies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Maxillopoda/by/rank/allNo description available1Millipedes (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/MillipedeMillipedes are a common class of arthropod with over 10,000 named species. Estimates suggest this is only a fraction of the total number of millipede species. Two pairs of legs per segment distinguish millipedes from the closely related centipedes which only have one. Early forms of millipede were some of the first animals to colonise land and therefore some of the oldest known fossils of land creatures. The largest known millipede is the giant African millipede which measures in excess of 28cm (12in).1Wildlife Finderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Millipede/by/rankWatch the most amazing animals in the world. Explore the BBC's natural history archive.1All Millipedeshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Millipede/by/rank/allNo description available1Monocotyledons (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/MonocotyledonMonocotyledons (liliopsida) are traditionally one of the two main groups of flowering plants, the other being the dicotyledons. What distinguishes the monocots is the single leaf in the seed (cotyledon) and flower petals in multiples of three. There are over 60,000 recognised species contained within some of the largest families of flowering plants such as the orchids (20,000 species) and grasses (10,000 species). Most of the agriculturally and economically important plants are in here from rice, wheat, barley and sugar cane to palms, bamboo and bananas.1Polychaete worms (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/PolychaetePolychaetes, or bristle worms, are a very common and diverse class of worms with over 10,000 species described so far. Commonly overlooked, these mostly marine worms can be brightly coloured and are to be found in tubes and burrows in the sand and mud of the beach to the depths of the ocean or even just free-living in the water. They all have bristles on their segmented bodies - in fact 'polychaeta' means 'many bristles'. They come in an impressive range of sizes from just 1mm to 3m long.1Reptiles (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/ReptileThe reptiles are a class of vertebrates. Charateristically they are cold-blooded, have dry scaly or horny skin and a four-chambered heart. Most reptiles lay eggs with leathery shells, but a few types bear live young. Because they are cold-blooded, reptiles are more common in the tropics than in temperate regions and are not found in polar areas.1Lobe-finned fishes and allies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/SarcopterygiiLobe-finned fishes (Sarcopterygii) contain the coelacanths, the lungfish and various other extinct groups. This class of fish was ancestral to all of the four-legged vertebrates: amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals. The bones of the pelvis, shoulder girdle and fins of lobe-finned fishes resembles a primitive, limb-like structure.1Sea star (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Sea_starNo description available1Sea urchin (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Sea_urchinNo description available1Wildlife Finderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Sea_urchin/by/rankWatch the most amazing animals in the world. Explore the BBC's natural history archive.1All Sea urchins (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/class/Sea_urchin/by/rank/allNo description available1<url>http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/collections</url><description>No description available</description><color>1</color><sources/></node><node><title>David Attenborough's favourite momentshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/collections/p0048522No description available1The wildlife of Lifehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/collections/p0057tcrNo description available1What on Earth...? 2009http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/collections/p005f9vpNo description available1Year of the Tigerhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/collections/p0063wt7No description available1Wildlife wind-upshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/collections/p006r1w3No description available1Wildlife Finder - Ecozoneshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/ecozonesEcozones are a method of dividing up the Earth's surface. Each ecozone is a large area that contains a number of habitats, which are linked by the evolutionary history of the animals and plants within them. For instance one ecozone is Australasia, because its marsupials evolved in isolation to mammals in the rest of the world.1Afrotropics (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/ecozones/Afrotropic_ecozoneThe Afrotropic ecozone includes all of Africa south of the Sahara, parts of Iran, Pakistan and the Arabian pennisula, as well as Madagascar and islands of the Indian Ocean.1Antarctica (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/ecozones/Antarctic_ecozoneThe Antarctic ecozone includes the continent of Antarctica, and various islands in the Southern Ocean, South Atlantic and the southern Indian Ocean, such as South Georgia and the Kerguelan Islands.1Australasia (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/ecozones/Australasia_ecozoneThe Australasian ecozone covers Australia, New Guinea and the easternmost islands of the Indonesian archipelago, including Sulawesi and the Lesser Sundas. New Zealand is also part of this ecozone.1Indo-Malay (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/ecozones/Indomalaya_ecozoneThe Indomalayan ecozone covers south and south-east Asia. It stretches from Afghanistan in the west to Japan's Ryukyu Islands in the east and Borneo in the south.1Nearctic (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/ecozones/Nearctic_ecozoneThe Nearctic ecozone covers North America, including northern Mexico and Greenland. Florida, though, sits outside this ecozone.1Neotropical (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/ecozones/Neotropic_ecozoneThe Neotropical ecozone incorporates South and Central America, plus the southern part of Mexico, the Caribbean Islands and Florida.1Oceania (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/ecozones/Oceania_ecozoneThe Oceania ecozone encompasses all the islands of the Pacific except New Zealand. It is the smallest and youngest of the ecozones, as many of these islands were formed recently, in geological terms.1<url>http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/ecozones/P</url><description>No description available</description><color>1</color><sources/></node><node><title>Palearctic (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/ecozones/Palearctic_ecozoneThe Palaearctic ecozone is the world's largest. It covers northern Africa, Europe, the northern part of Arabia and all of Asia north of the Himalayas. Japan and Iceland are also part of this ecozone.1Wildlife Finder - Familieshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/familyA family is a scientific grouping of closely related organisms. It has smaller groups, called genera and species, within it. A family can have a lot of members or only a few. Examples of families include the cats (Felidae), the gulls (Laridae) and the grasses (Poaceae).1Hawks, eagles and allies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/AccipitridaeThe Accipitridae is the largest of the diurnal bird of prey families and has eagles, hawks and harrier amongst its members. In most, but not all, species in this family, the females are bigger than the males.1Agamid lizards (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/AgamidaeAgamid lizards are a family of lizards with more than 350 species, including such distinctive members as the thorny devil and the flying lizard. This diverse group usually has well developed legs and mid-dorsal crest and can be found in Australia, Asia and Africa.1Albatrosses (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/AlbatrossAlbatrosses are large seabirds, but still extremely efficient flyers, using up more energy when landing and taking off than they do while in the air. There are 21 species in the albatross family, and these range across the Southern Ocean, Pacific Ocean and south Atlantic.1Alligators and caimans (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/AlligatoridaeAlligators and caimans contain eight living species, seven of which are found in the Americas. The American alligator is the biggest member of the family and Cuvier's dwarf caiman is the smallest.1Ducks, geese and swans (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/AnatidaeMembers of the duck, goose and swan family are found on every continent except Antarctica. Many species in this family are herbivorous and they are adapted for swimming on water, and in some cases diving in it.1Ants (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/AntAn estimated 20,000 species of ants exist in the world. All ants live in colonies and have a structured social system, with different castes - worker, soldier, queen and drone - all of which carry out specific tasks for the colony. Only the queen and the males she mates with on her maiden flight will reproduce. All the workers and soldiers are sterile females.1Bees (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/ApidaeBees in the Apidae family include the familiar honey bees and bumblebees, as well as the less well-known stingless and carpenter bees. This family includes some of the most highly socially organised insects on the planet outside the ant and termite species.1Asparagus, bluebells and allies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/AsparagaceaeAsparagus, bluebells and allies is a large and very diverse family of flowering plants, containing many genera and thousands of species. Members in this family can be found from the arid deserts of Mexico to damp British woodlands. The plants in this family range from the edible, such as the vegetable asparagus, to popular ornamentals such as the yucca and aspidistra. The large succulent Agave and the more delicate English bluebell are also included.1Bears (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/BearThe bear family (Ursidae) has eight living species in it, including the polar bear, sloth bear and giant panda. They are most common in the northern hemisphere, and not found in Australia, Antarctica or most of Africa.1Birds of paradise (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/Birds_of_ParadiseBirds of paradise are some of the most colourful birds on the planet. They live in tropical forests and though females are often dull in colour - because they need to be inconspicuous when sitting on the nest - the males are generally fabulously adorned. They use their decoration to great effect when they're trying to attract a mate, performing elaborate courtship dances to win the females over.1Cattle, antelopes and allies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/BovidThe Bovidae is the mammal family that contains all the cattle, goats, sheep, antelopes and gazelles. All male bovines have horns, though some hornless breeds of domestic cattle have been bred by man. In some species the females have horns too.1Hot vent crabs (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/BythograeidaeHot vent crabs are only found around hydrothermal vents, hydrothermal seeps and submarine volcanoes on the ocean floor. They have evolved to deal with the extreme conditions found in these hostile environments, such as very high temperature, high acidity in the water and potentially toxic levels of metals and gases. They were first scientifically described in 1980.1Camels, llamas and allies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/CamelidThis family of mammals consists of the camels, llamas and related animals like the vicuna. Some species are found today only as domesticated animals.1Candiru (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/CandiruCandirus use the spines on their gill covers to wedge themselves into the gills of other fish, where they live as parasites. They feed on blood and flesh from the victim's gills.1Dogs (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/CanidaeThe dog family (Canidae) contains all the fox, wolf, coyote, jackal and dog species. Wild canids are found on every continent, with the exception of Antarctica.1Cavies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/CaviidaeThe Cavy family are rodents, the most familiar member being the guinea pig. Other species in this family include the capybara and the mara. The cavies are native to South America.1Chameleons (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/ChameleonChameleons are famed for their ability to change colour, though not all species can. In a few types, the colour change is used as camouflage, but in most it is actually a form of communication. When not 'talking' to potential mates or warning off rivals, these chameleons will revert to a default colour that merges with their habitat - green for a jungle species, beige for a desert one.1Characids (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/CharacidaeCharacids are a family of freshwater fish found from Texas to South America. There are 776 species in the family including the piranhas, the neon tetras and a blind cave fish from Mexico. Many kinds of characid live in the Amazon, Orinoco and Paraguay Rivers.1Cichlid fish (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/CichlidCichlid fish are famed for their rapid evolution, particularly in the African Great Lakes, where over a thousand new species have evolved over the last 12,400 to 100,000 years. The members of the cichlid family have diverse diets, mating habits and methods of looking after their young.1Herrings, sardines and allies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/ClupeidaeHerrings, sardines and their allies form the family of fish called clupeids, which contains 216 species. Most clupeids feed on plankton, and the majority of species are marine, though a few migrate between the sea and freshwater. This family of fish constitutes a vital part of the fishing industry.1Ladybirds (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/CoccinellidaeLadybirds should be the gardener's favourite family of beetles as, with the exception of a couple of species, both adults and larvae are excellent predators of aphids and other pests. The bold colours and markings help to warn off potential predators.1Colubrid snakes (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/ColubridThe Colubridae is a family of snakes. It is a very big group, containing around 65 percent of all living snake species. Egg-eating snakes, boomslangs and grass snakes are all colubrids.1Crab spiders (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/Crab_spiderCrab spiders don't build webs to catch their prey. Instead, they rely on camouflage and ambush. These colourful spiders blend into their surroundings amongst leaves and flowers, where they lie in wait for unsuspecting flies and bees. Some species can even change colour to match the flower they are on.1Cranes (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/Crane_%28bird%29The crane family (Gruidae) includes as members the crowned cranes, the whooping crane and the common crane which has recently become re-established in Britain.1Cranes (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/Crane_(bird)The crane family (Gruidae) includes as members the crowned cranes, the whooping crane and the common crane which has recently become re-established in Britain.1New World rats, mice and allies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/CricetidaeNew World rats, mice and allies are a very diverse family of rodents that includes hamsters and lemmings. Widely distributed throughout the Americas, Europe and Asia, they live almost anywhere - from high up in the mountains to dry desert. Some species never leave the tree tops, while others are mostly aquatic. This is one of the largest families of mammals, containing nearly 700 species. Sadly, around one fifth of these species are currently considered threatened or endangered.1Crocodiles and allies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/CrocodileThe Crocodylidae is a family in the Crocodile order. The Nile crocodile, African dwarf crocodile and false gharial are example members of this family.1Dasyurid marsupials (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/DasyuridaeDasyurid marspuials are native to Australia and New Guinea. The most famous dasyurid is the Tasmanian devil, but there are another sixty species in the family. Although they are marsupials, many species do not have a pouch, and the young just cling to the teats and are dragged along the ground by their mother.1Deer (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/DeerThe deer family (Cervidae) has 44 living species, including the moose, muntjac and caribou. The males of all species of deer except the Chinese water deer have antlers. In caribou, both sexes have antlers.1Sundews and allies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/DroseraceaeSundews and their allies are a family of plants that, in addition to a few hundred species of sundews, include the Venus flytrap and the waterwheel plant. All the plants in this family are carnivorous, attracting, catching and consuming insects, slugs and other small invertebrates in different ways.1Fur seals and sealions (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/Eared_sealFur seals and sealions are distinguished from true seals by the presence of external ears and the ability to bring their rear flippers underneath their bodies to enable them to stand on all four limbs. For this reason, fur seals and sealions are more adept at moving on land.1Earless seals (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/Earless_sealEarless seals, or true seals, are one of three families to belong to the seal superfamily. Members of the phocidae include the grey seal, common seal and the massive southern elephant seal. With a few exceptions, seals in this family are usually found in polar, sub-polar and temperate waters. The lack of external ears means they have very streamlined bodies.1Eeltail catfish (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/Eeltail_catfishEeltail catfish can be found in both marine and freshwater. The freshwater species have evolved from marine ones that have colonised rivers. These catfish are common in the rivers of Papua New Guinea, but are also found in Australia, the Indian and Pacific Oceans.1Kraits, cobras and allies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/ElapidaeKraits, cobras and their allies are a family of venomous snakes, which includes such famous members as the coral snake, the inland taipan and the black mamba. The sea snakes also belong to this family.1Elephants (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/ElephantidaeElephants are represented by three living species: African forest, African bush and Asian. As the largest living mammals in the world, healthy adults have no natural predators, though the calves have plenty to fear from lions and tigers. The elephant's distinctive trunk is very versatile and can perform the functions of hand, foot and nose. Their large ears also play an important role in regulating body temperature. Elephants are highly social and very intelligent animals.1Hedgehogs and moonrats (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/ErinaceidaeHedgehogs and moonrats are quite primitive, and bear a certain resemblance in appearance and habits to the earliest mammals. Unlike those early mammals, they bear live young instead of laying eggs. Hedgehogs have spines, but moonrats (also known as gymnures) do not. They are all omnivores.1Beeches and oaks (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/FagaceaeBeeches and oaks are best known for their edible fruits. From an oak tree's acorns to the nuts of beech and chestnut trees, these fruits are part of the diet of many animals, including humans. Also recognisable are the alternately arranged, and often lobed, simple leaves and the seperate male and female flowers (catkins). Beeches, oaks and their relatives make up this family of flowering plants that can be deciduous or evergreen and grow either as trees or shrubs. There are around 1,000 species, the majority being oaks, with a wide distribution predominately in the broadleaf forests of the northern hemisphere.1Cats (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/FelidaeThe cat family (Felidae) occur naturally on all continents except Australia and Antarctica. Most cat species live solitary lives, lions being an exception. All cats are carnivorous.1Flying fish (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/Flying_fishFlying fish actually glide rather than truly fly. They launch themselves into the air by beating the tail very fast and spreading their pectoral fins to use as wings. There are 52 different species of flying fish which are found in the Indian, Atlantic and Pacific Oceans.1Geckos (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/GeckoGeckos are small lizards famous for their ability to walk up walls and other sheer vertical surfaces, and to hang from ceilings. However, they come a cropper if they attempt to climb on non-stick surfaces! They're welcome creatures to have around in the house as they feast on the insects you don't generally want inside.1Gibbons (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/GibbonGibbons are the acrobats of the primate world. These lesser apes live in small family troops in the rainforest treetops of south east Asia, defending their territories with visual displays and musical duets. They are masters of movement in the trees, swinging through the branches using their remarkably long forearms, and covering over nine metres in a single leap. Unfortunately, most species in this family are under threat from deforestation.1Giraffes and okapis (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/GiraffidaeGiraffes and okapis are the only living members of the giraffidae family. Both have long, almost prehensile tongues which they use to grab vegetation, and small horns on their heads. Okapis are solitary, whilst giraffes live in herds.1Gobies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/GobyGobies are the largest family of marine fish, containing 1,875 species of fish. A few species have evolved to live in freshwater, mainly on oceanic islands where there are few other freshwater fish. The smallest fish in the world is a Japanese species of goby.1Ground beetles (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/Ground_beetleGround beetles (carabids) are a large and successful family of beetles, with over 40,000 described species including the tiger and bombardier beetles. They are usually black or metallic coloured with ridged wing cases. Found worldwide, they inhabit ground vegetation, rocks, crevices and the underside of logs and tree bark. The defensive secretions of some of the beetles in this family are so toxic they can injure small animals.1Gulls and kittiwakes (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/GullThe gull family (Laridae) includes the kittiwakes as well as familiar gulls such as the herring gull and the black-headed gull. Some types seem as at home in towns and cities as they are at the coast.1Great apes and humans (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/HominidaeGreat apes and humans are all in the same primate family, called the Hominidae, and are the largest of the primates. In all species the male is bigger than the female. The great apes include gorillas, chimpanzees and orangutans.1Hummingbirds (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/HummingbirdHummingbirds are a diverse family of over 300 species. They have feet so tiny that they cannot walk on the ground, and find it awkward to shuffle along a perch. Hummingbirds eat nectar for the most part, although they may catch an insect now and then for a protein boost. Their super fast wing beats use up a lot of energy, so they spend most of the day sitting around resting. To save energy at night, many species go into torpor.1Iguanas and allies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/IguanidaeThe Iguanidae is a family of lizards to which the iguanas and chuckwallas belong. Many iguanids have evolved to cope with life in arid climates.1Jumping spiders (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/Jumping_spiderJumping spiders contain over 5,000 species making Salticidae the largest of the spider families. They are widely distributed over the planet and can even be found up mount Everest. The jumping spiders are aptly named as they can spring more than 50 times their own body length to land on unsuspecting prey. They hunt actively rather than catching prey in a web and they have excellent vision, with four big eyes in front and four smaller eyes on the top of their head.1Hares and rabbits (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/LeporidaeThe hare and rabbit family has over 50 species in it, living in habitats as varied as tundra, savannah and farmland. Some species dig burrows to live in.1Lilies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/LiliaceaeLilies are all about bold and showy flowers. These are the main reason for their success as ornamental plants, from the reds and yellows of tulips to clean, white lilies. However, the bright colours are more than just for show - they act as brilliant attractors of pollinating insects. Most individuals in this family of flowering plants grow from underground storage organs (bulbs) and their vegetation dies back at the end of the growing season (herbaceous). Leaves are usually long and thin and species from the lily family are distributed throughout most of the world.1Money spiders (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/LinyphiidaeThe money spider family is a huge group, with thousands of species in it. They are all small spiders, not more than 5mm long. They get their name from the folklore that if a money spider got caught in your hair it would bring you good luck and increased wealth.1Lungless salamanders (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/Lungless_salamanderLungless salamanders are the world's largest and most diverse family of salamanders. As their name suggests, none of them possess lungs. Instead they breathe through their skin. To aid this these salamanders usually live in damp and humid areas where the skin can be kept moist.1Kangaroos, wallabies and allies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/MacropodThis family of marsupials includes the kangaroos, tree kangaroos, wallabies and quokka. When they need to move quickly, they adopt a bipedal hopping gait and use their tail for balance.1Spider crabs (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/MajidaeSpider crabs are a family of long, skinny-legged crabs containing over 700 species. Often small and slow-moving, some species look like bits of debris and further camouflage themselves by adorning the bristles and spines of their exoskeleton with algae, seaweed and corals. This family contains the largest known athropod - the Japanese spider crab - which has a leg span of four metres.1Megabats (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/MegabatMegabats are one of the two types of bats, the others being the insect-eating bats. The megabats are fruit bats, and most species cannot echolocate. Most roost in trees and shrubs, and only those that possess echolocation venture into the dark recesses of caves. Because they eat fruit, some species are unpopular with orchard owners.1Megapodes (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/MegapodeMegapodes are also known as mound builders and incubator birds. These birds have large feet which they use to make big heaps of vegetation or shallow burrows in which they incubate their eggs. Unusually, their chicks are quite well-developed and have their feathers by the time they hatch so they don't need parental care (precocial).1Mongooses (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/MongooseMongooses are a family of small carnivores containing about 35 species, including the meerkat. Not only are mongooses rampant in Africa, they are also to be found in Asia and southern Europe. Some species live a solitary life while others live in packs and colonies, looking out for each other. Their speed and agility in attacking and killing poisonous snakes is legendary, with these battles often becoming roadside spectacles. Introduced into some places to control snakes and rodents, more often than not they become a worse problem themselves.1Mosquitoes (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/MosquitoMosquitoes are a family of insects encompassing over 3,500 recognised species. Most are associated with warm and humid regions, although they can be found in cooler areas and even in snow. Most mosquito species feed on nectar, however, the females of some species drink blood for the nutrients they need to develop eggs. They inject saliva that contains an anti-coagulant to prevent their proboscis from getting clogged up. Mosquitoes transmit diseases such as malaria to many millions of people every year.1Old World rats, mice and allies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/MuridaeThis family has more species in it than any other mammal family. It includes all the British species of mice and rats, plus gerbils, spiny mice and Australian native mice.1Weasels, badgers and allies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/MustelidaeWeasels, badgers and their allies form the family Mustelidae, and include weasels, otters, badgers and wolverines. It's the largest family in the order Carnivora. Mustelids are found everywhere except Antarctica, Australia and Madagascar, and some other, smaller islands.1New World vultures (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/New_World_vultureThe condors, the turkey vulture and the black vulture are amongst the members of this family. All the species live in the Americas.1New Zealand parrots (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/New_Zealand_parrotNew Zealand parrots are the kakapo, the kea and the one surviving species of kaka. They are all threatened by both habitat loss and predation by introduced species such as rats, possums and stoats.1Admirals, peacocks, monarchs and allies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/NymphalidaeNymphalidae is a family of butterflies with over 5,000 species, many of which are brightly coloured. It includes some well known species such as the monarch, red admiral, peacock and painted lady. Members of this family are widely distributed all over the world.1Dolphins, killer whales and allies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/Oceanic_dolphinDolphins, killer whales and pilot whales make up the Delphinidae, which is the largest family of cetaceans. They travel in groups, known as pods, and are renowned for their intelligence.1Old world monkeys (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/Old_World_monkeyThe Old World monkey family is, as its name suggests, native to the Old World - Europe, Africa and Asia - although the only European ones are the Gibraltar Barbary macaques. Members of this family include the baboons, langurs and rhesus monkeys, amongst others.1Bess beetles (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/PassalidaeBess beetles, or passalidae, are a family of beetles mostly found in the tropics. These large and dark beetles can produce 14 different sounds by rubbing their wings or legs in a process called stridulation. Adults and larvae live together in family groups inside rotting logs that have been excavated by the adults. Larvae are cared for and fed pre-chewed wood by the adults.1Pelicans (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/PelicanPelicans are well known for the large throat pouch they have attached to their lower beak. The pouch can hold over 10 litres of water and prey and in hot weather the pelicans flutter it to keep cool. Pelican chicks have no feathers or down when they hatch and take several weeks to grow their beaks to adult size.1Penguins (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/PenguinAlthough we think of penguins as Antarctic birds some, like the Galapagos pengiun, live in much warmer climates. The French explorer Beaulieu, on a voyage in 1620, believed penguins to be a type of feathered fish, due to their adaptations to life underwater.1Pheasants, partridges and allies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/PhasianidaeThe birds in this family (Phasianidae) range in size from the massive domestic turkey to the tiny quail. Chickens, grouse and peacocks number among its members.1Titis, sakis and uakaris (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/PitheciidaeTitis, sakis and uakaris are a family of South American monkeys. Titi monkeys are the smallest members of the family, and uakaris the largest. They eat fruit and the seeds within, but may add some leaves or an insect to their diet now and then.1Grasses (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/PoaceaeTrue grasses are a huge family that contains over 10,000 species. The grasses are of incredible importance to humanity as they include all our cereal crops, sugar cane and the pastures on which domestic animals graze. Grasslands are one of the world's major habitats.1Petrels and shearwaters (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/ProcellariidaeShearwaters, prions, fulmar-petrels and gadlfy petrels make up this family (though it excludes the storm or diving petrels). These birds can be found fishing for prey in every ocean in the world.1Raccoons, coatis and allies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/ProcyonidaeCoatis, kinkajous and raccoons are among the members of this mammal family. They are omnivores and only found in the Americas.1Rhinoceroses (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/RhinocerosRhinoceroses are megafauna and all five species alive today can reach over a tonne in weight as adults. While all the rhinos have horns, only the African species use them to fight with rivals. Asian rhinos slice at their opponents with their lower teeth instead.1Rorquals (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/RorqualRorquals are one of the types of baleen whale, and include the blue whale - the largest animal ever to have lived - in their number. The smallest rorqual is the minke whale.1Salmons and trouts (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/SalmonidaeSalmons and trouts, and their allies whitefish, chars and graylings, make up the family of ray-finned fish. Found throughout the northern hemisphere, the family includes species important to commercial and sport interests, which has resulted in their introduction to other waters of the world. Almost all species are anadromous: they live in the open ocean and swim up river to spawn in clean and cold freshwater. These are mostly large, predatory fish that reach lengths of up to two metres and prey on crustaceans, insects and smaller fish.1Scarab beetles (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/ScarabaeidaeScarab beetles include dung beetles, rose chafers and rhinoceros beetles amongst its family members. Ancient Egyptians revered scarabs crediting their divine incarnation with the act of rolling the sun across the heavens like a giant ball of dung.1Squirrels (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/SciuridaeSquirrels come in three types: tree squirrels, ground squirrels and flying squirrels. In temperate climates, squirrels often store or bury seeds and nuts for the winter. This makes them important seed dispersers, since not all of them survive to return to their cache.1Stingrays (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/StingrayStingrays are a family of cartilaginous fish containing nine genera and about 70 species. They can be found in all tropical and sub-tropical seas, and there is also a freshwater-only sub-family - the river rays. A flattened body shape and disc-shaped pectoral fins help stingrays live and hide in sand and mud underwater. The famous barbed stinger on the tail is only used in self-defence, often when they are stepped on in shallow waters.1Stork (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/StorkNo description available1Hogs and pigs (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/SuidaeHogs and pigs make up a family of stocky and bristly-haired even-toed ungulates. All 16 species in the hog and pig family are fond of wallowing in the mud, from the giant forest hog of the African jungles to the common domestic pig. They combine a keen sense of smell with a flexible, muscular snout to root around the forest and woodland undergrowth, sniffing out things to eat, from fungi and bulbs to earthworms. They are usually very vocal animals producing some very noisy grunts and squeals.1Swallows and martins (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/SwallowSwallows and martins have evolved to be specialists at catching insects on the wing. Their streamlined shape and long, thin, tapering wing shape makes them fast and highly manoeuvrable.1Seahorses and pipefish (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/SyngnathidaeSeahorses, pipefish and seadragons fall under the family Syngnathidae. They all feed by sucking tiny invertebrates up into their snouts and the males brood the eggs in a pouch until they hatch out.1Bush crickets (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/TettigoniidaeBush crickets, which number over 6,000 species, can be found on every continent except Antarctica. They are usually spotted amongst vegetation, where they can mimic leaves and sticks or just hide away. The males rub modified front wings to produce the loud sound (called stridulation) that begins the mating process. Females are usually silent. On rare occasions swarms of bush crickets can cause serious damage to crops.1Tortoises (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/TortoiseTortoises inhabit a variety of warm places from deserts to jungles. In the wild, most tortoises have a very short hibernation, as the climate rarely gets too cold. When kept as pets in a cooler climate, hibernation is extended. Their heavy shells make tortoises rather slow and ponderous, though they can be quite active, especially when two males compete for the favours of a female.1True owls (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/True_owlThere are two families of owls, and this one is the larger of the two, with over ten times more species in it than the Tytonidae or barn owl family. Most of those species live in forests.1True parrots (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/True_parrotsThe true parrot family includes among its many members the macaws, lorikeets and lovebirds. Species in this family eat mostly seeds, though fruit, nuts and other foods are also consumed.1True toads (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/True_toadTrue toads are family of amphibians containing over 350 species and are distinguished from amphibians commonly known as toads, by their lack of teeth and generally warty skin. Many species can release toxins from their skin as a deterrent to predators that might otherwise try to eat them.1Barn, masked and bay owls (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/TytonidaeBarn, masked and bay owls is a family of owls containing 16 species. They are recognised by their distinctive heart-shaped face, which is actually a structure made of feathers and serves the purpose of aiding the owls' hearing. The owls in this family often prey on small birds as well as on the rodents that owls are famed for catching. Their habit of taking the former prey has led to some man-made ecological catastrophes, because they were introduced to islands to control rodents and have instead killed the local birds.1Varanidae (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/VaranidaeNo description available1Vesper bats (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/Vesper_batVesper bats are the largest bat family with over 300 species, all of which can echolocate. They are widespread and found in every habitat except the cold polar regions. Those that live in temperate areas may migrate away or hibernate through the winter, when few insects are available to eat. All British bats are in this family apart from horseshoes.1Wasps (Vespidae) (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/VespidaeWasps of the vespidae family contain all the social wasps and many of the solitary species. Familar examples from this family include the common wasp (Vespula vulgaris) and the hornet. The bold black and yellow markings of some aggressive species has been copied in nature by other insects to warn off potential predators, this is known as Batesian mimicry.1Water kingfishers (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/Water_kingfisherAll the kingfishers in this family eat fish, and most are native to the Americas, although the pied kingfisher is found in Africa, Asia and parts of Europe.1Woodpeckers, wrynecks and allies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/WoodpeckerWoodpeckers, wrynecks and their allies are best known as the family that chisel into tree trunks with their beaks. Most species eats insects that they prise out of wood with their beaks and tongue, but the sapsucker consumes tree sap. Wrynecks spend most of their time on the ground and feed on ants.1Burnet moth (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/family/ZygaenidaeBurnet moths, unlike most others, come out in the daytime. Most are safe from attack by hungry birds because they taste horrible and are slightly poisonous - a fact that they advertise with their bright red or yellow wing spots.1FAQ (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/faqinsert_description1Wildlife Finder - Generahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genusA genus is a scientific way of showing that species are very closed related to each other. In fact the first word of the species' scientific name is its genus. So for lions (Panthera leo), Panthera is the genus and tells us that they are closely related to tigers (Panthera tigris), because they share the name.1Acacias (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/AcaciaAcacias are shrubs and trees found in warm and tropical regions, from the Americas and Europe to Asia and Africa, however, the vast majority of species are native to Australia. Belonging to the pea family, acacias have pods, and acacia beans are on the menu in Mexico. If their sharp spines aren't enough to keep the grazers away, their leaves are also loaded with some very nasty compounds. This genus contains some incredibly useful species, utilised by the food and perfume industries and traditional medicine as well as providing wood for furniture. The Ark of the Covenant is said to be made out of acacia wood.1Death adders (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/AcanthophisDeath adders include the fastest striking snake species in the world. Not only are they quick, they are also extremely venomous, causing paralysis and sometimes death. They are not active hunters, unlike most snakes, but lure prey into a deadly ambush.1Goshawks and sparrowhawks (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/AccipiterGoshawks and sparrowhawks are small to medium-sized hawks. These formidable birds of prey hunt small mammals and birds in woodlands and forests. They have short broad wings for rapid acceleration and long tails for manoeuvrability. There are around 50 species in this group and all have a distinctive white grouping of feathers that forms a band above the eye. Goshawks and sparrowhawks can be found from the tropical forests of Africa and Papua New Guinea to the foothils of the Himalayas.1Baobabs (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/AdansoniaBaobabs are trees recognisable by their distinctive swollen stems. Occurring naturally in the dry areas of Magagascar, Africa and Australia, they store massive amounts of water in their stems to cope with seasonal droughts. The tree's fruits are large pods known as 'monkey bread' or 'cream of tartar fruit' and are rich in vitamin C. One baobab tree in South Africa, known as 'Big Baobab', has a circumference of 47 metres and even a bar for 60 people inside the trunk.1African elephant (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/african_elephantAfrican elephants were thought to be one species until very recently. What were previously thought to be subspecies are now categorised as the bush, or savannah, elephant and the forest elephant.1Agamas (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/Agama_%28genus%29Agamas are the most common genus of lizard found in Africa. Dominant males in this genus turn their skin bright blue and orange, whereas subordinate males and those that have been recently scared will be a dull brown in colour.1Agamas (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/Agama_(genus)Agamas are the most common genus of lizard found in Africa. Dominant males in this genus turn their skin bright blue and orange, whereas subordinate males and those that have been recently scared will be a dull brown in colour.1Amegilla bees (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/AmegillaAmegillas form a genus of large bees that has around 250 species. Some of its members are important agricultural pollinators in Australia and other tropical and sub-tropical areas. The blue-banded bee uses vibration to obtain pollen (buzz pollination). The beautifully named teddy bear bee is also a species of amegilla.1Asian giant salamanders (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/AndriasAsian giant salamanders are the largest salamanders in the world, and species are found in China and Japan. These impressive animals grow to around 1.5m long.1Great penguins (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/AptenodytesThe great penguins contains two living species - the king penguin and the emperor penguin. In both species the male incubates the egg while the female is at sea.1Fungus gnats (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/ArachnocampaThere are four species of fungus gnat in the genus Arachnocampa. They spend up to a year as larvae, then pupate into adult flies, mate, lay eggs and die. One species is known as the the New Zealand glowworm in its larval form. The caves inhabited by the glowworms have become a popular tourist attraction.1Southern fur seals (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/ArctocephalusThere are eight species of fur seal in this genus. Although they are called southern fur seals, one species is found off Mexico and California, and another in the Galapagos.1Eared owls (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/AsioEared owls are known for the ear-like tufts sticking up from their head. These tufts are simply feathers and have no connection with hearing. Eared owls are very widespread, although there are only half a dozen species in the genus. Most of them are ground nesters, though the long-eared owl nests in trees. On rare occasions, short-eared owl will do this too.1Athene owls (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/Athene_%28owl%29Athene owls are named after the Greek goddess of civilisation and wisdom, Athena, whose symbol was an owl. Folk tradition on the wisdom of owls survives to this day. There are four species of Athene owls, including the burrowing owl. Some species - such as the little owl - hunt during the day rather than at night. There are several extinct species, including a large flightless owl which once lived on the island of Crete.1Athene owls (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/Athene_(owl)Athene owls are named after the Greek goddess of civilisation and wisdom, Athena, whose symbol was an owl. Folk tradition on the wisdom of owls survives to this day. There are four species of Athene owls, including the burrowing owl. Some species - such as the little owl - hunt during the day rather than at night. There are several extinct species, including a large flightless owl which once lived on the island of Crete.1Baboons (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/BaboonBaboons are large, old world monkeys containing five species native to Africa and south-west Arabia. Physically similar with long faces and dog-like muzzles, all baboons are intelligent, curious, adaptable and quite crafty. Rarely will baboons stray far from watering holes or willingly sleep on the ground. There is nothing simple about baboon society where the social behaviour is both varied and complex. A group of baboons is called a troop within which there is a striking size difference between the sexes, with males often twice the as large as females.1Banded penguins (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/Banded_penguinThe banded penguins are so named for the band of black across their chests. There are four species of banded penguin.1Bottlenose dolphins (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/Bottlenose_dolphinThere are two species of bottlenose dolphin - the common and the Indo-Pacific. These are the dolphins that are trained to perform for the public in some zoos and marine parks.1Brycons (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/BryconBrycons are a genus of fish which are also known as South American trout, although they are not closely related to true trout.1Bumblebees (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/BumblebeeBumblebees are a familiar sight in our gardens. There are 24 species of bumblebee found in the UK. The decline of British bumblebee populations was first noticed in 1959. All bumblebees form small colonies, but usually only the queens survive the winter. Because of this they do not need to store large quantities of honey in their hive.1Sexton beetles (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/Burying_beetleSexton beetles are the undertakers of the beetle world. They are attracted to the corpses of small mammals and birds by sulphur chemicals given off during decay. Once a pair of beetles have taken possession of a body - sometimes fighting off other pairs to do so - they will bury it, by digging away at the soil underneath. They then use the buried body as both home and food for their larvae.1Wolves, dogs and jackals (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/CanisThe genus Canis has as its members the jackals, wolves, coyote and domestic dog. Members of this genus are found on every continent except Antarctica, the dingo having been introduced to Australia a few thousand years ago.1Ibex and goats (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/Capra_%28genus%29Ibex and goats form a genus of bovine animals that contains fewer than 10 species. They are agile and skillful climbers among the steep cliffs of mountainous habitats and survive on the sparse vegetation that grows there. There is very little geographical overlap of the different species and where they do meet they don't interbreed. Species range from the alpine ibex of the Alps and the Caucasian turs of the Caucasus mountains, to the more widely distributed wild goat.1Ibex and goats (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/Capra_(genus)Ibex and goats form a genus of bovine animals that contains fewer than 10 species. They are agile and skillful climbers among the steep cliffs of mountainous habitats and survive on the sparse vegetation that grows there. There is very little geographical overlap of the different species and where they do meet they don't interbreed. Species range from the alpine ibex of the Alps and the Caucasian turs of the Caucasus mountains, to the more widely distributed wild goat.1Capuchin monkeys (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/Capuchin_monkeyCapuchin monkeys are tree-dwelling New World monkeys that live in central and southern America. These intelligent and clever monkeys use tools such as stones to crack open nuts, shellfish and crabs. Their abillity to be easily trained gave rise to their exploitation as organ grinder monkeys. They were named by explorers after their resemblance to an order of Catholic friars, the Order of Friars Minor Capuchin.1Elk, red and sika deer (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/CervusElk, red and sika deer are a genus of large mammals native to large parts of Europe, Asia and North America. Their adaptability is almost legendary and has been instrumental in their successful introductions into many other areas of the world from South America to Australia. Inhabitants of open woodlands and grassland, they are also mountain dwellers that move down the slopes in winter. True deer make a tasty meal for many large predators, most notably wolves, bears and big cats. Recent DNA studies have left only four species in this group: the two red deer species, the sika deer and the wapati or elk.1Chimpanzees (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/ChimpanzeeChimpanzees are a genus in the great ape family. The only two species are the familiar common chimpanzee of central and west Africa, and the very closely related bonobo which is only found in the Congo. Both species have long powerful arms for climbing trees and knuckle-walk on all fours. Chimpanzees are very intelligent, making and using a variety of tools that include spears for hunting bushbabies and twigs for termite fishing. Chimp society is one with complex social behaviour where playing, tickling and laughter are as evident as learning and culture.1Sickletail birds of paradise (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/CicinnurusSickletail birds of paradise are one of 13 genera in the birds of paradise family. The king bird of paradise was once the lone species in this group until it was joined by the allocation of the magnificent and Wilson's birds of paradise to the genus. Their bright blue legs and feet are a striking feature in the forests of New Guinea, Indonesia and surrounding islands. The males of all three species are bright and colourful compared to the relatively dull and drab browns of the females.1Common short-beaked dolphin (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/Common_dolphinCommon short-beaked dolphins are very social and are seldom alone. The whole school (usually 10 to 500 individuals) can all be leaping in the air at one time.1Cordyceps (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/CordycepsCordyceps are a group of parasitic fungi containing over 400 described species. Their hosts are ususally insects but they can also infect other fungi. One species parasitizes ants and can change its victim's behaviour. The cordyceps impels the ant to climb up a stem where it dies. From this elevated vantage point the fungus's fruiting body grows out of the victim's body, allowing the spores to be more widely distributed by the wind. Some species, such as the caterpillar fungus, are considered to have medicinal properties in China and Tibet.1Crested penguins (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/Crested_penguinCrested penguins all have tufts of yellow feathers on their heads. They show the most complex courtship displays of all the penguins. Rock-hopper and Macaroni penguins are part of this genus.1Sundews (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/DroseraSundews are a genus of carnivorous plants which usually live in wet habitats where the acidic conditions limit the amount of nutrients they can extract from the soil. These plants therefore supplement their diet by catching and digesting small creatures such as insects. Some species of sundew are very long-lived. Sundews can be found growing natively on every continent except Antarctica.1Eucalyptus trees (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/EucalyptusEucalyptus trees are native to Australia, New Guinea and parts of Indonesia. Fast-growing species have been introduced to Africa, India, the Americas and Europe for the commercial production of oil, timber and so on. Most eucalyptus trees are evergreen, though some shed their leaves in the dry season.1Falcons, hobbies and kestrels (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/FalconFalcons, hobbies and kestrels are all in the genus Falco. In general terms, the larger birds are falcons; the smaller swift ones possessing long, narrow wings are hobbies and; those that hover while hunting for prey are the kestrels.1Flamingos (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/FlamingoFlamingos are wading birds with a very specialised diet - they filter feed, straining out tiny brine shrimps from the water with their specially evolved beaks and tongue.1Flying penguins (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/Flying_aceFlying penguins are a very recent addition to the penguin family in evolutionary terms. A few isolated species have evolved to make the most of their small wings, allowing them to migrate to warmer climes for the harsh Antarctic winter months. Elusive and secretive, these populations of penguin are extremely hard to locate in the rainforest and even seeing them fly on their migration is a rare experience. Little is yet known about just how these small birds survive flying over such vast distances, or why the anatomical differences they possess enable them to fly when other penguin families cannot.1Giant wetas (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/Giant_wetaThe giant wetas are the world’s heaviest insects. The heaviest ever recorded was a female that weighed 71g (2.5oz). That's three times the weight of an average house mouse. In fact, wetas are the insect equivalent of mice. They evolved in the small rodent niche because in New Zealand there were no mice to compete with and no nocturnal mammalian predators to hunt them.1Gorillas (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/GorillaGorillas live in central Africa and are the world's largest primates, with wild males weighing over 200kg. There are two species of gorilla, western and eastern, both of which have subspecies.1Grey langurs (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/Gray_langurGrey langurs are a genus of Old World monkeys once thought to be a single species. Seven distinct species are now recognised, which are widespread throughout south Asia. The most northerly species are generally larger and heavier than the southern langurs and walk with their tails pointing forward, while southern langurs point their tails backwards. Grey langurs, with their black hands and face, are also known as Hanuman langurs after the monkey-god, and so are considered sacred in the Hindu religion.1Dumbo octopuses (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/GrimpoteuthisDumbo octopuses are so named for their likeness to the Disney elephant character. They live deep down in the ocean and and can be found at depths ranging from 400 metres down to as much as 4,800 metres. They hover a short distance above the sea bed while they look for prey. Eighteen species of dumbo octopuses have so far been discovered.1Hammerhead sharks (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/Hammerhead_sharkHammerhead sharks are recognisable for their bizarre head shape which is thought to make the shark more sensitive to electrical signals used to detect hidden prey. There are ten species of hammerhead. The family also includes the bonnethead sharks and the winghead shark.1Common hares and jackrabbits (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/HareMost of the world's hares belong in this genus, Lepus. Hares are bigger than rabbits, and their young have a full coat of fur when they are born.1Hylobates gibbons (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/HylobatesHylobate gibbons are one of four genera of gibbons, and contains six species. This group is the the most widespread ranging from China where the Lar gibbon can be found, right down to Indonesia where the silvery gibbon lives. The hylobate gibbons are recognisable by their distinctive white ring of facial fur. Each genus has a different number of chomosomes, with hylobates having 44. Like all gibbons species, hylobates are tail-less and have long arms for swinging through the trees.1Kiwis (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/KiwiKiwis are related to ostriches and cassowaries and, like their larger relatives, are flightless. There are five species of kiwi, all native to New Zealand. They are quite shy, and tend to be nocturnal in areas where there are humans.1Gulls (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/LarusGulls are a common sight around Britain's coasts - and not that infrequent inland, either. Most of the world's gulls are in genus Larus, including our herring gull and common black-headed gull.1Sea kraits (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/LaticaudaSea kraits are a genus of sea snakes which contains eight species. They have an extremely potent venom, calculated to be ten times as lethal as that of the king cobra. Some species have bold stripes to advertise the fact that they are dangerous.1Coelacanths (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/LatimeriaCoelacanths are living fossils. The whole group was thought to be extinct until a specimen was caught in 1938. There are two living species: the coelacanth and the Sulawesi coelacanth. They inhabit deep water, so are rarely seen and difficult to film.1Trapdoor spiders (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/LiphistiusTrapdoor spiders, of which there are about 50 species in the Liphistius genus, are found in China, Japan and south east Asia. These spiders rarely leave their underground burrows, and seal the entrance with a disguised web trapdoor. When an unsuspecting insect touches one of the silk fishing lines, or trip wires, that radiate out of the entrance, the trapdoor springs open and the spider grabs it prey.1Australasian tree frogs (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/LitoriaAustralasian tree frogs are found in Australia, New Guinea and the surrounding islands. The number of species is currently believed to be around 150, however, this estimate is continually growing as new species are discovered. There is enormous variation in the colour, size, behaviour and habitat of these tree frogs. For example, some species are almost incapable of climbing, yet others rarely leave the trees.1Divers (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/LoonDivers, also commonly known as loons, are water birds found in north America, Europe and Asia. There are five living species all in the same family (gaviidae) and order (gaviiformes). All divers sit low in the water and have a body shape that's streamlined for diving. They are also powerful underwater swimmers. Their distinctive calls include hoots, tremoloes, yodels and a wail that sounds oddly similar to a wolf's howl.1Lutungs (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/LutungLutungs are a group of old-world monkeys that includes 17 species of lutungs, dusky langurs and leaf monkeys. These long-tailed monkeys live in groups in the tropical forests of south east Asia. A single male presides over a harem of females and when he is deposed his offspring are in grave peril. A multi-chambered stomach aids digestion of all the tough plant material these monkeys eat. The main culprit for the endangered status of many lutungs, critical in a few, is deforestation.1Giant kelps (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/MacrocystisGiant kelps are the largest of the kelps, which in turn are the most complex kinds of brown algae. Reaching lengths of 45m long, kelps need a rocky seabed to attach themselves to. In ideal conditions where the water is clean, clear and nutrient-rich, giant kelps can grow at a rate of 36cm (14 inches) a day.1Kangaroos, wallabies and wallaroos (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/MacropusThere are four species of kangaroo, eight wallabies and two wallaroos in this genus.1Periodical cicadas (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/MagicicadaLarge numbers of periodical cicadas emerge from the ground every few years, instead of a few every year like most cicadas. There are three species of 17 year cicadas and four species of 13 year cicadas, the number telling how often they emerge. Both thirteen and seventeen are prime numbers, which makes it difficult for predators to time their own population increases to match what the cicadas are up to. This means there are always more cicadas than the predators can possibly eat!1Woolly rats (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/MallomysWoolly rats are found in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea, usually in mountain forests or mountain grasslands. Some woolly rat species are called giant rats, since they can weigh almost a kilo and a half. That's about three to six times what a typical pet rat weighs.1Bee-eaters (Merops) (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/Merops_%28genus%29Merops is the largest of the three genera of bee-eaters, and includes 23 of the 26 species. These bee-eaters are found in the warmer climes of the Old World, from Europe to Australia, but mostly in Africa. They are brightly coloured birds which catch and eat flying insects. A large proportion of their diet - as the name suggests - is made up of bees and wasps. Bee-eaters remove the sting before they eat their prey by hitting and rubbing it against a hard surface.1Bee-eaters (Merops) (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/Merops_(genus)Merops is the largest of the three genera of bee-eaters, and includes 23 of the 26 species. These bee-eaters are found in the warmer climes of the Old World, from Europe to Australia, but mostly in Africa. They are brightly coloured birds which catch and eat flying insects. A large proportion of their diet - as the name suggests - is made up of bees and wasps. Bee-eaters remove the sting before they eat their prey by hitting and rubbing it against a hard surface.1Monitor Lizards (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/Monitor_lizardMonitor lizards have forked tongues, which they use (as a snake does) to detect scents in the air. Many of them are good swimmers and this family includes the largest lizard on Earth, the Komodo dragon.1Mouse lemurs (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/Mouse_lemurMouse lemurs, like all the other lemurs, are native to Madagascar. These forest dwelling primates are strictly nocturnal and, due to their diminutive size, can be quite easily missed. In fact new species are continually being discovered. Mouse lemurs include the world's smallest primate - Madame Berthe's mouse lemur - which is only 10cm long. Long tails aid mouse lemurs to climb and leap.1Cobras (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/NajaCobras in the genus Naja are found in Asia and Africa. They are highly venomous and each species injects a cocktail of chemicals that have all kinds of different effects. For example, the effect might be slowing or speeding the heart rate, raising or lowering blood pressure, or preventing blood from clotting. So, if bitten, it's important to know which species was the culprit, so the right anti-venom can be adminstered.1Knob-tailed geckos (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/NephrurusKnob-tailed or kidney-tailed geckos are so named because their tails often end in a small round lump.1Nestor (genus) (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/Nestor_(genus)No description available1Orangutans (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/OrangutanOrangutans are Asia's only great apes with one species found on the island of Borneo and the other on Sumatra. They are the largest of the tree-living animals with small weak legs and very powerful, muscular arms that may be as long as two metres. These 'people of the forest', as their name translates, are remarkably intelligent. Some populations use sticks to probe for termites to eat, and this knowledge is passed down through the generations. Males are larger than females and have distinctive throat pouches and cheek pads.1Sheep (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/OvisSheep comprise several wild species as well as all the breeds of the familiar domestic sheep. Wild sheep prefer rocky or mountainous habitats, and run to higher ground when threatened.1Roaring cats (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/PantheraThese are the only cats that can roar - the leopard, lion, tiger and jaguar. Members of genus Panthera are all big cats, although there are also big cats in other genera.1Paradisaea (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/ParadisaeaParadisaea is the genus of birds of paradise that contains the world's most spectacular species. The males of the seven species, all of which are native to Indonesia and Papua New Guinea, boast some of the most impressive ornamental plumes and long tail wires of any of the birds of paradise. Their amazing plumage is shown off to the females in a display area, or lek. Species in this group include the iconic greater bird of paradise.1Grey cuscuses (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/PhalangerGrey cuscuses are marsupials, so the female has a pouch in which she keeps her babies. She can have up to three babies, but may only succeed in rearing one of them. Found in New Guinea and Australia, grey cuscuses are nocturnal. There are 13 different species.1Pines (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/PinusPines are a genus of evergreen trees or shrubs. There are over 100 species of pine, native to every continent in the northern hemisphere. Owing to the quality of their timber, pines have been introduced into much of the southern hemisphere. As evergreens with needle-like leaves, they can grow in poor soils and harsh conditions. Most species are monoecious - they have separate male and female cones on the same tree. Many birds and mammals rely on the seeds and in return for this food supply help disperse the seeds, a job that can also be done by the wind.1Prairie dogs (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/Prairie_dogPrairie dogs are not dogs at all but ground dwelling squirrels, whose name is derived from their dog-like barking calls. The five species are native to the grasslands and prairies of North America. These very social rodents live in often enormous, but well structured, colonies called towns, all sharing a complex system of underground burrows. When a predator approaches, alarm calls are emitted by sentries who perch on mounds of earth. Different calls are used to identifiy different types of predator.1Fruit bats (Pteropus) (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/PteropusFruit bats in the genus Pteropus include the world's largest bat - the greater flying fox - which can have a wingspan of 180cm. They cannot echolocate, but don't really need to as their food (fruit and nectar) doesn't try to escape and because they roost in trees not in the pitch black of caves. Their eyesight alone is perfectly good enough for navigation. Fruit bats also have a very good sense of smell for detecting flowers and fruit.1Pygmy parrots (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/Pygmy_parrotPygmy parrots, as their name suggests, are the smallest members of the parrot family and are even smaller than budgerigars. There are six species which are found in the Solomon Islands and Papua New Guinea. Unusually for birds, pygmy parrots eat a lot of lichen and fungus as well as some seeds, fruit and insects.1Brush-tailed penguins (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/PygoscelisBrush-tailed penguins include adelie, chinstrap and gentoo penguins. They nest on the very edge of the Antarctic continent on southern sub-Antarctic islands and commonly lay two eggs at a time. In most years, a good proportion manages to hatch and raise both chicks. As nesting material is seriously limited here, nests usually consist of stone circles. The stones are considered to be so valuable that breeding pairs offer them to each other as gifts during mating rituals and risk irritating their neighbours by stealing stones from adjacent nests.1Mangroves (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/RhizophoraTrue mangrove trees grow in tropical, inter-tidal areas and have the unique ability to survive a daily flooding with salt water that would spell death for other trees. Mangroves need to be able to cope with both sea water and freshwater. To do this, arching stilt-roots lift the plant out of the salty water and various clever methods are employed to either filter out or exclude the salt. The seeds of these mangroves germinate whilst still on the plant, before falling from the tree and floating away on the tide, which makes them viviparous plants.1Rhododendrons (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/RhododendronRhododendrons are a genus of flowering plants found primarily in the northern hemisphere and introduced to Britain in the late 18th century. Some types are now a pest in Britain, because they out-compete many native plants and, because their leaves contain toxins that some animals find inedible, their spread is hard to control. Honey made from rhododendron pollen or nectar can cause hallucinations, loss of co-ordination and vertigo, but only if it has been made by the bees very recently. This is known as mad honey disease!1Rock wallabies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/Rock-wallabyRock wallabies spend their days out of harm's way up cliffs or in caves, and venture out to feed at night. They are extremely adept at moving quickly up and down rocky slopes.1Bushy-tailed squirrels (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/SciurusBushy-tailed squirrels are known for, and named after, their prominent and fluffy tails. Flicking their bushy tails is a method of communication between the squirrels. They also have large ears and possess sharp claws that help them climb. There are 28 species of bushy-tailed squirrel, all in genus Sciurus. They are found in Europe, Asia and the Americas.1Sea eagles (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/Sea_eagleSea-eagles are birds of prey usually found catching fish around large bodies of water and coastlines. Known also as fish eagles, they are not to be confused with the two species of smaller true fish eagles of southeast Asia. Of the eight species of sea eagles there are three obvious species-pairs, for example, the white-tailed sea eagle of Europe and Asia and the bald eagle of north America - they cannot breed together but are physically very similar.1Skuas and jaegers (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/SkuaSkuas look rather like gulls, but are in a family of their own. Like gulls, they often attack other seabirds, steal fish from them, they also eat carrion.1Snub-nosed monkeys (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/Snub-nosed_monkeyThere are four species of snub-nosed monkey, all native to China or Vietnam.1Swans (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/SwanSwans are the largest members of the duck and goose family. With mute swans weighing as much as 15kg. There are six species in the genus. All the swans native to Britain have white plumage, whereas those from the Southern hemisphere have all black or partly black feathers.1Eurasian grouse (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/TetraoEurasian grouse are a group of gamebirds found across Europe and Asia. Males from the two black grouse species and two capercaillie species are renowned for their mating displays in the breeding season. During a lek the males gather at traditional display grounds to compete with each other and court the quietly watching females with a strutting display. Where the males hope to get noticed with their big, bold plumage, the females are just the opposite, blending into the vegetation with their camouflaged plumage.1Tree-Kangaroos (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/Tree-kangarooTree kangaroos have evolved from a ground-dwelling, hopping ancestor to a specialist for life in the trees. Compared to monkeys and squirrels, their climbing skills can sometimes seem a bit clumsy, but as they have no competition from other tree-climbing mammals, or threats from arboreal predators, they don't need to be as agile.1Black, brown and polar bears (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/Ursus_%28genus%29Black, brown and polar bears (Ursus) are probably the most familiar of the five living genera in the bear family. There are four remaining species within this genus and several subspecies of black and brown bears in different parts of the globe.1Black, brown and polar bears (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/Ursus_(genus)Black, brown and polar bears (Ursus) are probably the most familiar of the five living genera in the bear family. There are four remaining species within this genus and several subspecies of black and brown bears in different parts of the globe.1Candirus (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/VandelliaCandirus are parasites that feed on the blood and flesh of their victims. Using the spines on their gill covers, they wedge themselves into the gills of other fish, where they then live and feed.1True foxes (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/VulpesTrue foxes fall within the genus vulpes, and are therefore distinct from other species of canids also referred to as foxes. They are opportunistic feeders, eating what ever they can from small mammals and birds to carrion and fruit. Species of fox can be found on every continent except Antarctica, occupying habitats from the mountainous to the sandy. They range from the large and very successful red fox to the small Rüppell's fox. Quite often the tip of the tail is a different colour from the rest of the pelt.1Weasels and allies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/genus/WeaselWeasels include the stoats, ferrets and polecats, as well as the European mink. The smallest is the least weasel of North America, which weighs a maximum of 250g, though much smaller ones are known.1Wildlife Finder - Habitatshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/habitatsA habitat, or biome, is the type of environment in which plant and animals live. Habitat is dictated by what kinds of plants grow there, the climate and the geography. Rainforest, coral reefs and the tundra are all habitats where particular kinds of plants and animals might be found.1Sea bed (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/habitats/Benthic_zoneThe sea bed, or benthic zone, is inhabited by animals and plants that either live permanently on, burrow within, or are closely associated with the bottom of the ocean. Species found here are dictated more by the substrate - rock, sand, mud or coral, for example - than by the depth of water overhead. Many are specially adapted to living on the substrate and some to high pressure as the continental shelves gives way to the abyssal plains in deeper waters.1Bog (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/habitats/BogBogs, though similar to swamps or marshes, are a distinctive kind of wetland where peat forms from dead plant matter. Waterlogged conditions set this cycle going: still water holds little oxygen compared to flowing water, so plant material can't decay fully and slowly amasses. The decaying plants keep the oxygen level suppressed. Bogs are common in places with wet climates like Siberia, Ireland and Scandinavia.1Brackish water (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/habitats/BrackishBrackish water describes the part salty, part fresh mix found where the two meet in such places as estuaries, deltas and mangrove swamps. It's also found on the surface layer of the Baltic and Black Seas, where the salt water is diluted by the many freshwater courses that pour into them. Since conditions are optimal for neither freshwater or marine creatures, brackish waters often lack diversity.1Coastal (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/habitats/CoastThe coastal habitat represents the strip of land above the high tide mark, but still near or influenced by the sea. It includes places such as cliffs where seabirds can nest, the splash zone where salt-tolerant lichens grow and areas of dunes and marram grass behind the beach. Many seabirds and seals use the coastal habitat as a place to breed or moult.1Deep ocean (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/habitats/Deep_seaThe deep ocean begins where the continental shelves and their shallow waters give way to the dark depths where little or no sunlight penetrates. Here, in the layer underneath the sunlit open oceans, live some of the most bizarre and highly adapted creatures on the planet. With no plants or algae here to photosynthesize and form the base of the food chain, life here is largely dependent on the dead material and droppings that sink down from above.1Desert (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/habitats/Deserts_and_xeric_shrublandsDesert is any area that receives less than 250mm of rainfall a year. Not just the endless, baking sand dunes of popular conception, it includes arid areas in temperate regions. Plants in this habitat are well adapted to conserving water and often have to survive extremely hot days and cold nights when the temperature plummets. Deserts may appear to have very little life in them, but a closer inspection can reveal high biodiversity.1Estuaries (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/habitats/EstuaryAn estuary is an inlet of the sea, into which flows a river or stream. Fresh and salt water mix here, so the inhabitants have to cope with both. Some estuaries have extensive mudflats which are exposed at low tide, and teem with life. Many estuaries were formed at the end of the Ice Age, when sea level rose and flooded the coast. If an estuary completely silts up, it will turn into a delta.1Flooded grassland (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/habitats/Flooded_grasslands_and_savannasFlooded grasslands are the half grassland, half wetland typified by the Florida Everglades, the marshes of Southern Iraq and the Pantanal of Brazil. They may be permanently or seasonally flooded, which has an obvious effect on what kinds of plant and animal species found here. This type of wetland area is of particular value to bird life, so bird populations – both local species and migrants – are often high in numbers.1Hydrothermal vents (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/habitats/Hydrothermal_ventHydrothermal vents - black smokers, white smokers and warm water vents - are areas on the sea floor where water heated by volcanic activity under the seabed gushes out. Unusually, the animal communities down here don't use the sun to get their energy. Instead, chemicals in the hot waters form the basis of the food chain. Hydrothermal vent communities do, however, still rely on oxygen produced by photosynthesis in the sunlit zones.1Lakes and ponds (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/habitats/LakeFrom the smallest pond (1m square) to the largest lake, this biome provides many opportunities for life to thrive. Because many of these bodies of water are closed environments, they often have self-contained ecologies, enabling some to become evolutionary microcosms. One such example is the African Great Lakes, where over a thousand new species of cichlid fish have evolved during the last 12,400 to 100,000 years.1Mangroves (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/habitats/MangroveMangrove forests grow on tropical coasts with soft soils and are flooded twice daily by the tide. They are important nursery areas for many species of fish. Mangroves and coral reefs have a symbiotic relationship – the reef protects the coast where the mangroves grow from being eroded by the sea, and the forest traps sediment washed from the land that would otherwise smother the reef.1Marsh (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/habitats/MarshMarshes form where water is very close to, or above, the ground surface for part or most of the year. This results in a waterlogged environment that stays soggy even if there are no pools of standing water. Marshes are either features in their own right, or zones along the margin of a lake or a river's edge. In intertidal areas along the coast, salt marshes sometimes occur. Surprisingly, these are enormously biologically productive.1Mediterranean forest (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/habitats/Mediterranean_forests,_woodlands,_and_scrubMediterranean forest includes the fynbos of South Africa, the matorral of Chile and forests in parts of California. Hot, dry summers, contrast with much milder, wetter winters. Bushfires are a common occurrence, so many of the plants are adapted to surviving being scorched. Some species actually depend on fire to clear out competitors or to germinate their seeds.1Mountain grassland (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/habitats/Montane_grasslands_and_shrublandsMountain grasslands such as those in the Ethiopian highlands, on the Tibetan Plateau and up in the Andes, include the alpine tundra above the treeline as well as grasslands below it. These high altitude grasslands often exist as isolated 'islands' in a sea of another habitat type. Consequently, the animals and plants that live there, having been cut off from similar species in other areas of the habitat, evolve down their own paths.1Mountains (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/habitats/MountainMountains are in general a much tougher place to life than equivalent lowland habitats; partly due to the lower temperatures and harsher weather. At very high altitudes there is also less oxygen and carbon dioxide in the air, making life difficult for both animals and plants. Soils are also thin or non-existant on steep mountain slopes, restricting the types of plants that can grow there. The uppermost slopes of the tallest mountains may be completely barren of plant-life.1Shallow seas (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/habitats/Neritic_zoneShallow seas cover the continental shelves. These sunlit, or neritic, waters are where the oceans are most productive, where biomass is highest and where all the major sea fisheries of the world take their catches. The shallow seas include warm tropical waters, temperate seas like those round the UK and the chilly waters of the Arctic and Southern Oceans.1Open ocean (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/habitats/PelagicThe open ocean is the sunlit top layer of the ocean beyond the continental shelves. The vast bulk of the sea, it covers over 360,000,000 square kilometres of the Earth's surface. It's referred to as the 'marine desert' because nutrients are lower here than in the shallow seas and life can be scarce. Open ocean, or pelagic, predators therefore have to travel fast and far to find food, hence many – such as marlin, tuna and dolphins – are swift swimmers.1Polar (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/habitats/Polar_regionPolar regions, found at the planet's northern and southern extremes, are the icy wastes of the continental ice caps and the frozen pack ice of the ocean. The only 'plants' here are specialised forms of cold-loving algae that grow on the surface of snow. Only animals that don't rely on vegetation - such as penguins, seals and polar bears - are able to live here.1Reefs (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/habitats/ReefReefs have existed since at least the Cambrian, although the familiar coral-dominated, reefs of today are a much later arrival. A coral reef is much more than old rock lying on the sea bed. An intricate structure, complex set of relationships and distinct zones (reef top, reef sides, debris piles around the base) offer myriad places for animals to live and hide, which leads to incredible diversity.1Rivers and streams (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/habitats/RiverRivers and streams, burns, brooks and springs – the names are varied but the flora and fauna all have to cope with the same thing: water that flows continuously in one direction. If you live here you need a way to avoid being washed downstream and ultimately into the sea. Plants and animals have to be able to cling on, hide away from the flow or swim against the current.1Swamp (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/habitats/SwampSwamps are wetland areas where water totally or partially submerges the vegetation, for part or most of the year. Swamp waters flow very slowly, and there are often reed beds or sedges growing at their margins. Any raised areas within a swamp, are likely to be drier and may therefore have trees growing on them. Swamps include the fens, the Florida Everglades and the Okavango Delta.1Taiga (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/habitats/TaigaThe taiga is the largest land habitat - a northern zone of coniferous forests, stretching right round the planet from western Alaska to eastern Siberia. In the winter the temperature can drop to as low as -50 degrees Celsius and the taiga is blanketed in snow. Many of the trees have to survive being partly buried in snowdrifts. In summer, the climate is much milder and many birds migrate to the taiga regions.1Broadleaf forest (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/habitats/Temperate_broadleaf_and_mixed_forestsBroadleaf forests are the dominant habitat of the UK and most of temperate northern Europe. There's little left of Britain's ancient wildwood, but isolated pockets of oak, beech and mixed deciduous and evergreen woodlands are scattered across the continent, and dictate its biodiversity. These forests are most diverse in the eastern areas of North America and in China. Unlike many forests, plentiful immature trees and undergrowth means most life is on the forest floor.1Coniferous forest (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/habitats/Temperate_coniferous_forestThe coniferous forests of temperate regions undergo warm summers and cool winters, unlike their tropical counterparts. The species aren't exclusively conifers, there are usually a few broadleaf varieties too. Giant trees – the redwoods of the Americas, the mountain ash of Australia and the kauri of New Zealand – are often a feature, particularly where there is higher rainfall. Britain, perhaps surprisingly for its cold, rainy reputation, doesn't have the climate to support these giant trees.1Temperate grassland (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/habitats/Temperate_grasslands,_savannas,_and_shrublandsTemperate grasslands include the prairies of North America, the steppes of Russia and the pampas of Argentina. Summers here are mild to hot and the winters can sometimes be very cold – for instance, blizzards can blanket the great plains of the United States. Although large areas have now been converted to agriculture, in the past temperate grasslands were home to herds of large grazing animals such as bison, deer or kangaroos.1Tropical coniferous forest (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/habitats/Tropical_and_subtropical_coniferous_forestsTropical coniferous forests may sound like an odd concept to northern Europeans who associate conifers with cooler northern climes. However, their ability to conserve moisture is the perfect adaptation for certain areas of the tropics and subtropics where conditions are drier year round. Parts of Asia and Central and North America have such conditions, with some of the most diverse examples of this kind of forest found in Mexico.1Tropical dry forest (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/habitats/Tropical_and_subtropical_dry_broadleaf_forestsTropical dry forests, in contrast to rainforest, have to survive a long dry season each year, so the predominantly deciduous trees shed their leaves to cope with it. Sunlight can then reach the ground, so the season that's bad for the trees is good for the forest floor. Though there's generally less biodiversity here than in a rainforest, there's more scope for ground-dwellers in the resulting thick undergrowth.1Tropical grassland (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/habitats/Tropical_and_subtropical_grasslands,_savannas,_and_shrublandsTropical grasslands include the savanna usually associated with Africa, and savanna-type grasslands found in India, Australia, Nepal and the Americas. They are characterised by drought-resistant shrubs and grasses, dotted with trees such as acacias or baobabs. Seasons here are wet and dry, rather than summer and winter. The plentiful food that springs into life in the wet season draws and supports huge herds of grazing animals, such as the familiar mega-herds of African antelope.1Rainforest (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/habitats/Tropical_and_subtropical_moist_broadleaf_forestsRainforests are the world's powerhouses, the most vital habitats on the planet. Characterised by high rainfall, they only cover 6% of the Earth across the tropical regions, but they contain more than half of its plant and animal species. Fast-growing trees form a dense canopy that prevents much sunlight reaching the forest floor and discourages undergrowth. The canopy is where it's at, and it hums with an incredible diversity of life.1Tundra (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/habitats/TundraTundra is the cold, treeless region around the poles that has permafrost as one of its defining features. Even at the height of summer, the soil a few centimetres under the surface remains frozen. The tundra therefore lacks animals that dig deep burrows and plants that require deep root systems. The permafrost, plus the short summer and seasonal waterlogging, also explains why trees don't grow here.1Urban (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/habitats/Urban_ecosystemUrban habitats are areas dominated by human activities and human constructions. These include towns, cities and associated landscapes, such as landfill sites. It can almost be described as a patchwork of other habitats where buildings are artifical cliffs, sewers and drains are waterways, and parks, gardens and brownfield sites provide forests and meadows. Animals which have adapted to the urban environment are tolerant of the light and noise generated by human activity, and take advantage of the heat and the abundant food sources.1Temporary pools (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/habitats/Vernal_poolTemporary ponds, or vernal pools, are dry for part of the year, but fill with water when the rains come or when the snow melts. They can be tiny puddles or quite extensive areas, such as playa lakes, but because very few fish can survive in them they provide a unique habitat for a number of rare invertebrates and amphibians. In the UK, one in four woodland, old meadow and heathland temporary ponds contains Red Data species.1Wetlands (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/habitats/WetlandWetlands, whether swamp, bog, marsh or fen, are waterlogged areas where aquatic plants thrive. Some, like the Okavango Delta, dry up seasonally. Others, like the fenlands of England, are permanently wet. The shallow water can be fresh, brackish or salty, as wetlands often occur where a terrestrial habitat meets a marine one. They can be an effective natural flood control mechanism, allowing excess river water, for example, to disperse over large areas, and are particularly important for birds.1Wildlife Finder - Kingdomhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/kingdomKingdoms are the major categories into which scientists divide up all living things. The main kingdoms are animals, plants, fungi and bacteria, although there are others. Each kingdom has its own suite of defining characteristics - for instance plants have rigid cell walls, whilst animals do not.1Animal Kingdom (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/kingdom/AnimalThe animal kingdom is estimated to contain about 10 million species. The defining characteristics of an animal include the fact that it is a multicellular organism, that its cell walls are not rigid and that it gets its food by eating other living things, rather than by processes such as photosynthesis. Animals can range from being tiny creatures which are only a collection of a few cells, to giants like the blue whale.1Chromista Kingdom (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/kingdom/ChromistaChromista include diatoms, ciliates and their relatives. As many of the species in this kingdom can photosynthesise, and have rigid cell walls, they were once thought to be plants. Their members include kelps, the water mould that caused the Irish potato famine and single-celled organisms such as the paramecium.1Fungus Kingdom (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/kingdom/FungusFungi are a diverse kingdom, with members ranging from the familiar mushrooms to brewer's yeasts, the mould that grows on rotting fruit and the infection that causes athlete's foot. Fungi are found in every habitat, although they play a bigger role in terrestrial ecosystems than in aquatic ones. The vast majority of plants have a symbiotic relationship with fungal species that grow on their roots.1Plant Kingdom (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/kingdom/PlantPlants form a kingdom which includes groups that reproduce by spores, such as mosses and ferns, and groups that reproduce by seeds, such as conifers and flowering plants. Plants get their energy through photosynthesis, using sunlight to convert water and carbon dioxide into sugar and releasing oxygen as a by-product - perhaps the most important biological process on Earth.1Wildlife Finder - Ordershttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/orderAn order is a scientific way to categorise related organisms. An order is a smaller grouping than a class, but bigger than a family or genus. Examples of orders are willows, cockroaches and primates.1Swifts and hummingbirds (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/ApodiformesApodiformes are one of the most diverse orders of migratory birds on Earth. There are almost 450 species so far identified within three living familes: swifts, tree swifts and hummingbirds. All the birds in this order have very short legs and tiny feet that are only good for perching. Long wings containing short bones allow for some spectacular flying and hovering.1Asparagus, orchids and allies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/AsparagalesAsparagus, orchids and allies are an order of monocotyledonous flowering plants. Almost every habitat on Earth has species from within this order. This is not surprising as it contains the world's largest flowering plant family, orchids, which comprises more than 22,000 species. Several agriculturally and horticulturally important families are contained within this order, from the onion and asparagus to crocuses and gladioli.1Bats (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/BatBats are the only mammals that truly fly, rather than just gliding. The bats are very numerous, there being well over 900 recognised species. They are divided into two types - the megabats, which mainly eat fruit, and the microbats, which mainly eat insects.1Beetles (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/BeetleBeetles form around 40% of all insects and are therefore the biggest insect group, with around 350,000 species in total. All beetles start life as grubs and then form a pupa and metamorphose into their adult form. Most adult beetles can fly, although a few, such as glow-worms and weevils, have lost the ability.1Needlefish, flying fish and allies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/BeloniformesNeedlefish, flying fish and three other families of fish together make up the order Beloniformes. There are 191 species in the order, the vast majority of which live in the sea. Most of them are fast swimmers.1Caecilians (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/CaecilianCaecilians look like worms but are actually amphibians that inhabit the wet tropical regions of south America, Africa and south east Asia. They make up one of the three orders of amphibians, alongside frogs and salamanders. Lacking any limbs but possessing a retractable sensory tentacle, caecilians - with the exception of a few aquatic species - have a burrowing lifestyle. The skin of one African species is fat and nutrient-rich, so the larvae peel this skin off the parent and eat it.1Bristle-footed worms (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/CanalipalpataCanalipalpata are an order of the marine polychaete worms. Species in this order are mostly filter feeders owing to a lack of teeth. Within the known 31 families are some quite remarkable species, including the Pompeii worm that can withstand temperature gradients of 60C (140F) and the multicoloured and spiraled Christmas tree worms which are found burrowing in coral around the world's tropical oceans.1Ground sharks (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/CarcharhiniformesThe ground sharks (Carcharhiniformes) is an order of cartilaginous fish which includes the hammerhead sharks, cat sharks and requiem sharks. This is the biggest order of sharks, and they are found in marine, brackish and freshwater.1Carnivora (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/CarnivoraThe Carnivora is an order of mammals descended from carnivorous ancestors. Although most of the living Carnivora are indeed meat-eaters, some are omnivorous, and the giant panda is largely vegetarian. Bears, hyenas, cats and seals are all members of the Carnivora.1Catfish (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/CatfishCatfish (Siluriformes) are a large order of fish, with over 2,400 species in it. Most catfish live in freshwater, but there are a few marine species. They are found on every continent except Antarctica.1Whales, dolphins and porpoises (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/CetaceaWhales, dolphins and porpoises belong to the order Cetacea. These are aquatic mammals that have streamlined bodies evolved for swimming. Their hind limbs have become vestigial as part of this streamlining. All whales, dolphins and porpoises are cetaceans, including the biggest animal ever to have lived - the blue whale.1Shorebirds and allies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/CharadriiformesThe Charadriiformes is an order of birds. It contains shore birds as diverse as waders, gulls and puffins, and a few types that live far away from water.1Storks and long-legged wading birds (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/CiconiiformesStorks and other long-legged wading birds form the order Ciconiiformes. With their long legs and long sturdy beaks these birds are ideally suited to foraging in shallow water. This order also includes herons, ibises and spoonbills, although recent studies have suggested these families may not belong here.1Anchovies, herrings and allies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/ClupeiformesAnchovies, herrings and their allies are an order of fish that contains nearly 400 species. These fish are highly streamlined for fast swimming and often form huge shoals which makes many species commercially important for the fishing industry.1Hornbills, kingfishers and allies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/CoraciiformesHornbills, kingfishers, bee-eaters and related birds form an order called the Coraciiformes. Many of the species in it have brightly coloured plumage.1Crocodiles, caimans and allies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/CrocodiliaCrocodiles, caimans and their relatives - alligators and gharials - are reptiles adapted for an aquatic way of life. They are powerful swimmers, but also spend some of their time on land, basking in the sun. By moving back and forth between water and land, they can keep their bodies at an optimum temperature as the day heats up or the night cools down.1Crabs, shrimps and allies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/DecapodaThe Decapoda is an order of crustaceans which contains all the familiar species such as hermit crabs, lobsters and prawns. All the members of the group have ten legs, hence the scientific name (deca = ten, pod = foot). In many species the front pair of legs has a set of pincers on the end.1Kangaroos, possums and allies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/DiprotodontiaThe Diprotodontia is an order of marsupial mammals which includes all the most familiar Australian animals: kangaroos, wallabies, possums, koalas and wombats. Most diprotodontids are herbivorous, although some eat insects and nectar, and a few extinct ones were carnivores.1Even-toed ungulates (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/Even-toed_ungulateThe even-toed ungulates have two weight-bearing toes on each foot, and may have lost the other toes entirely (as in antelope), or have another two much smaller toes (as in pigs). Hippopotamuses, camels and giraffes are all Artiodactyls.1Daytime birds of prey (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/FalconiformesThe Falconiformes is an order of birds. All the familiar birds of prey that hunt by day - falcons, eagles and vultures - are in this group. Owls are in a different order.1Flies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/FlyFlies, also known as true flies to distinguish them from creatures such as caddisflies and mayflies, are an order of insects which includes such familiar species as the midge, the bluebottle and the fruit fly. Some estimates put the total number of fly species at around a million, though only a fraction of these have been formally described by scientists.1Frogs and toads (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/FrogFrogs and toads are the most diverse and widespread of the three amphibian orders. Unlike the other amphibians, adult frogs and toads have no tails but they do have many adaptations to jumping, for example long hind legs, elongated ankle bones and a short vertebral column. Many frogs contain mild toxins, but some, such as the poison dart frogs, are deadly.1Gamebirds (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/GalliformesThe gamebirds order (Galliformes) includes such diverse members as pheasants, quail, guineafowl, mallee fowl and currasows. The domestic chicken and domestic turkey are also part of this group. Many species lay large clutches of eggs. The chicks hatch out well-developed, and are able to walk and feed themselves shortly after hatching.1Goose barnacles (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/Goose_barnacleGoose barnacles are odd-looking crustaceans usually found in quite deep water. Occasionally they can be found on debris that has become dislodged from the sea bed and washed up on the shore. They are found in oceans the world over, except in Arctic regions.1Ants, bees and wasps (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/HymenopteraThe ants, bees, wasps, horntails and sawflies are all in the order Hymenoptera. The group is very diverse with solitary and social species, herbivores and carnivores, and parasitic and non-parasitic lifestyles. All species hatch out as grubs, then later pupate into their adult shape. Females usually have a long, thin, egg-laying organ called an ovipositor. In some species this has developed into a sting.1Hares, rabbits and pikas (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/LagomorphaHares, rabbits and pikas all belong to the mammalian order lagomorpha. They are similar to large rodents and were once considered part of the same order. There are native populations on all the continents except Australia and Antarctica. Lagomorphs are found in a wide range of terrestrial habitats and have been introduced to many areas by man.1Butterflies and moths (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/LepidopteraButterflies and moths (Lepidoptera) are one of only two types of insects to have wings covered in tiny scales. These are very delicate and give the wings their colour. The scales can also create iridescent effects. All butterflies and moths start life as a caterpillar, form a pupa, then emerge as a winged adult.1Nautiluses (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/NautilidaNautiluses are an order of cephalopods that live between 100 to 300 metres down in the ocean. Nautiluses have changed very little during the last 500 million years or so, and where there were once hundreds of species there are now only six that remain today. The nautilus' coiled shell has a series of chambers filled with gas, into and out of which it can pump fluid when it needs to dive or ascend. These shells show some of the most amazing spirals in nature.1Lacewings and relatives (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/NeuropteraLacewings and their relatives, including antlions, alderflies and snakeflies, form a large and diverse order of insects that have large membranous wings. The adults have two pairs of similar sized wings that contain extensive branching of the wing veins. Lacewing larvae are effective predators of crop pests and can be used as a biological control.1Octopuses (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/OctopusOctopuses divide into two types, the deep-sea finned octopuses and their finless, shallower water cousins. Most of the world's octopuses fall into the shallow water category. Many octopuses have poison glands, but few are toxic to humans - the bite of the blue-ringed octopuses is the exception.1Odd-toed ungulates (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/Odd-toed_ungulateOdd-toed ungulates are a group of mammals that have either one or three toes. The three families in this order are the large and tank-like rhinoceroses, pig-like tapirs and the agile horses. The 17 species in this order can be found in Africa, Asia and even the Americas and include domesticated horses and donkeys. With their browsing and grazing lifestyle, they have a specially enlarged section of the large intestine in which bacteria live and help them digest their food.1Damselflies and dragonflies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/OdonataDamselflies and dragonflies are known collectively as Odonata. Millions of years ago, this order also included some examples of the largest flying invertebrates that have ever lived.1Grasshoppers, crickets and allies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/OrthopteraGrasshoppers and crickets are part of an insect order called the Orthoptera, which also includes wetas and katydids. Most types are good at jumping, although some - such as the mole cricket - cannot jump. Juvenile orthopterans are miniature copies of the adults, except that they lack functional wings.1Owls (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/OwlOwls vary greatly in size, from the tiny elf owl to the huge eagle-owls. There are over 200 species and they are found on all continents except Antarctica. Owls are predators. Their prey varies from insects to fish to small mammals, and they rely on hearing rather than vision to locate it. Many species specialise in hunting at night, with feathers specially adapted for silent flight.1Parrots (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/ParrotThe parrots is an order of birds which includes cockatoos, budgerigars and parakeets. Most species live in the tropics. However, there are native parrot species in New Zealand, and there are feral populations of ring-necked parakeets living wild in Britain.1Perching birds (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/PasserineThe Passerines, or perching birds, is the biggest order of birds - over half of the world's bird species are passerines. The group includes flycatchers, birds of paradise, crows and all the familiar garden birds of Britain. Passerine birds have three forward pointing toes and one backwards pointing one.1Pelicans, cormorants and allies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/PelecaniformesThe Pelecaniformes is an order of birds which include, amongst others, the pelicans, cornmorants, gannets and frigatebirds. They are all waterbirds with webbed feet, and catch fish, squid and other aquatic creatures.1Perch-like fishes (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/PerciformesThe perch-like fishes (Perciformes) is an order of ray-finned fishes, typified by the perch. It contains the largest number of species of any vertebrate order. Fish as diverse as gobies, barracudas and remoras are in this group.1Stick insects (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/PhasmatodeaStick insects use camouflage and mimicry to great effect. As their name suggests, they look so much like sticks or other bits of plant that they blend effortlessly into their backgrounds as a form of defence. In some species the mimicry starts even before they are born, as their eggs resemble seeds.1Anteaters and sloths (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/PilosaAnteaters and sloths are native to the Americas. There are 10 living species in this order, including the tamanduas, two-toed sloths and three-toed sloths.1Primates (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/PrimateThe Primates is an order of mammals with features characteristic of tree-living ancestors, even in those species that now live on the ground. Lemurs, lorises, bush-babies, monkeys, apes and humans are all primates. Most primates live in the tropics and subtropics.1Tubenoses (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/ProcellariiformesThe tubenoses is an order of seabirds which contains the albatrosses and various families of petrels. They get their name from their prominent nostrils, which are covered by tubes on their upper beak. These strange-looking nostrils give them a fantastic sense of smell.1Rays, skates and allies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/RajiformesRays, skates and their allies, the Rajiformes, are an order of cartilaginous fish containing 12 families. Fish in this group generally have flat bodies and a large pectoral fin that forms a disc. The undulation of this fin propels the fish through the water. Though most are found in marine waters, there are some freshwater species - notably the river rays. Some species of stingray have a toxin which can be harmful, and even fatal, to humans.1Ostriches, rheas and allies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/RatiteOstriches and their relatives are ratites - an order of flightless birds. The other members are the kiwis, emu, cassowary and rheas, as well as various extinct species such as the elephant bird.1Rodents (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/RodentThe rodents is the largest of the mammalian orders, with over 2,000 species in it. Familiar rodents include mice, rats and squirrels, but animals such as the porcupine, the beaver and the agouti are also rodents. All rodents have front teeth specialised for gnawing.1Salamanders (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/SalamanderSalamanders are amphibians, although they may look lizard-like in appearance. Salamander species vary in size from under 3cm to about 180cm in length. No matter what their size, they need to stick to moist or wet environments, or they will dehydrate.1Dugongs and manatees (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/SireniaDugongs and manatees, said to be the basis for the mermaid myths, are enormous aquatic mammals that can weigh over a tonne. Over time, their bodies have evolved to become streamlined and they have lost their hind limbs as part of this process. They have unusually dense bones that probably to help them stay submerged.1Spiders (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/SpiderThe spiders (Araneae) are an order of arachnids. All spiders have eight legs and can produce spider silk, though not all species can make webs.1Lizards, snakes and allies (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/SquamataLizards, snakes and amphisbaenids make up an order of reptiles known as the Squamata. They all have scaly skins, and all male squamates have two penises.1Squid (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/SquidSquids are fast-swimming, predatory molluscs. They locate their prey by sight, and ensnare the victim by shooting out two of their tentacles armed with suckers or hooks. The prey is then killed by a bite from the squid's beak. Squid are fussy eaters, though, and often 'fillet' the meat from a fish in tiny bites and discard the rest. This is partly because their brain surrounds the throat, which makes it risky to swallow sharp or hard objects such as fish bones.1Termites (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/TermiteTermites are a highly successful group of colonial insects, with thousands of species. They build nests in trees or underground, as well as building large mounds above ground. Just like cows, many types of termite have special micro-organisms in their guts to help them digest plants.1Turtles, terrapins and tortoises (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/order/TurtleTurtles, terrapins and tortoises are all in one order, called the Testudines. They all have a shell, though only certain species can withdraw their lead and limbs into it. All the many types of turtle, terrapin and tortoise lay eggs. In some, the temperature at which the egg incubates will decide whether the embryo becomes male or female.1Wildlife Finder - Phylumhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/phylumA phylum - also known as a division when referring to plants - is a scientfic way of grouping together related organisms. All the members of a phylum have a common ancestor and anatomical similarities. For instance, all the arthropods have external skeletons. Phlya are large groups and are further subdivided into classes, orders, families and so on.1Arthropods (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/phylum/ArthropodArthropods are invertebrate animals that have an external, jointed skeleton usually known as a carapace. The phylum includes insects, crustaceans, centipedes, millipedes, spiders, scorpions and horseshoe crabs. The carapace has to be shed and regrown periodically as the animal grows larger.1Chordates (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/phylum/ChordateChordates include all the vertebrates and some invertebrate allies that possess, for part or all of their lives, a structure called a notochord. The notochord is a stiff rod that helps support the body and runs parallel to the main nerve cord. In the vertebrates, these have evolved into the spinal column, which is reinforced and protected by cartilage or bone. The allied invertebrates in the chordates phylum include members that only have the notochord for part of their life: the sea squirts, lancelets and hagfish.1Cnidaria (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/phylum/CnidariaCnidaria are a phylum of aquatic animals that includes jellyfish and corals. They have two body shapes: the medusa (a jellyfish-like swimming form) and the polyp (a sea anemone-like sessile or static form). During their life cycle they may transform themselves from one shape to the other. All cnidarians possess stinging cells, which they use to kill or paralyse prey.1Echinoderms (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/phylum/EchinodermEchinoderms are a plylum of animals that includes starfish, sea urchins and sea cucumbers. They are radially symmetric marine creatures composed of identical segments rather than left/right mirroring. The most familiar is a typical starfish, which has five identical legs radiating out from its body.1Flowering plants (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/phylum/Flowering_plantFlowering plants evolved during the time of the dinosaurs, and enlisted the help of animals to transfer their pollen from one plant to another. The fact that many flowers are brightly coloured or have strong scents is not to please human senses, but to attract the insects, birds or other animals that will help pollinate them. There are over a quarter of a million types of flowering plant.1Mollusca (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/phylum/MolluscaNo description available1Wildlife Finder - Plantshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/plantsWelcome to the world of plants. Find out about some of the most unusual plant species and the ingenious survival strategies that have allowed them to live, thrive and survive in all but the most extreme parts of the planet. From the carnivorous Venus flytrap and sundews to the giant titan arum and the intriguingly named dragon's blood tree, explore the fascinating life of plants.1redirecthttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmesNo description available1redirecthttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/radioNo description available1Bird soundshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/radio/dawn_chorusAn audio journey through some of the world's most distinctive natural dawn sounds1Bird soundshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/radio/dawn_chorus/bird_squawk.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Animals - Dawn Chorus1Bird soundshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/radio/dawn_chorus/dawn_tales.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Animals - Dawn Chorus1Bird soundshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/radio/dawn_chorus/further_information.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Animals - Dawn Chorus1Bird soundshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/radio/dawn_chorus/schedule.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Animals - Dawn Chorus1Bird soundshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/radio/dawn_chorus/sound_advice.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Animals - Dawn Chorus1Bird soundshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/radio/dawn_chorus/up_bark.shtmlBBC Online - Nature - Animals - Dawn Chorus1Animal Hospital http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/a_hospitalRolf Harris brings pet and vet stories from RSPCA Harmsworth and around the world1Animal Hospital - Abroadhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/a_hospital/abroad.shtmlBehind the scenes on animal Hospital, with profiles of the people involved and video of a day in the life of filming RSPCA Harmswoth.1Behind the Sceneshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/a_hospital/bts.shtmlBehind the scenes on animal Hospital, with profiles of the people involved and video of a day in the life of filming RSPCA Harmswoth.1Live Chathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/a_hospital/chat.shtmlJoin the live chat with Rolf Harris on Wednesday 3 December1Ask Rolf Harrishttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/a_hospital/chat_transcript.shtmlTranscript of the online live chat with Rolf Harris1Get Involvedhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/a_hospital/contact.shtmlSend us a story you think we should follow up or a question for Rolf Harris to ask the Animal Hospital vets.1Animal Hospital - Crewhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/a_hospital/crew.shtmlProfiles of the TV production crew that film Animal Hospital at RSPCA Harmsworth, including job descriptions and qualifications.1Ireland Visithttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/a_hospital/index_hebrides.shtmlAnimal Hospital visits the SSPCA in the Hebrides and finds out what challenges the terrain poses.1Hong Kong Visithttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/a_hospital/index_hongkong.shtmlAnimal Hospital visits the Hong Kong SPCA.1Ireland Visithttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/a_hospital/index_ireland.shtmlAnimal Hospital visits the USPCA in Northern Ireland and finds out about the law on exotic pet ownership.1Sarajevo Revisitedhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/a_hospital/index_sarajevo.shtmlAnimal Hospital visits the animal shelter in Sarajevo to find out how donations from viewers have helped.1Competition winnerhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/a_hospital/index_winner.shtmlThe competition winner spends a day behind the scenes with Rolf Harris and the staff of the Harmsworth.1Animal Hospital - Staffhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/a_hospital/staff.shtmlProfiles of the staff at RSPCA Harmsworth Animal Hospital job descriptions and qualifications.1Animal Hospitalhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/a_hospital/week.shtmlAnimal Hospital on TV and updates from previous stories.1Bill Oddie Goes Wild http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/bill_oddieBill Oddie explores the British countryside in a third series of Bill Oddie Goes Wild. View video programme previews and get some tips on finding wildlife in the UK, where to go and what to see.1Loch Lomond & The Trossachs http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/bill_oddie/locationsBill uncovers the delights of Loch Lomond in Scotland.1County Kerryhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/bill_oddie/locations/countykerry.shtmlBill Oddie seeks out the wildlife of County Kerry1Bill Oddie Goes Wild - Kenthttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/bill_oddie/locations/kent.shtmlBill uncovers the delights of the partly man-made landscape that has become the wildlife-rich wetlands we see today1Norfolk Broadshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/bill_oddie/locations/norfolk.shtmlBill uncovers the delights of the partly man-made landscape that has become the wildlife-rich wetlands we see today.1Somerset Levels and Moors http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/bill_oddie/locations/somerset.shtmlBill explores the legendary land of Avalon.1St Kildahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/bill_oddie/locations/stkilda.shtmlBill uncovers the wilds of St Kilda1Tyneside http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/bill_oddie/locations/tyneside.shtmlBill Oddie searches for the wildlife of Tyneside1Finding Wildlife Tipshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/bill_oddie/tipsBill shares his top tips for finding wildlife in eight different habitats found in the British Isles.1Bill Oddie's Coastal Wildlife Finding Tipshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/bill_oddie/tips/coastal.shtmlBill shares his top tips for finding wildlife in coastal areas1Bill Oddie's Farmland Wildlife Finding Tipshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/bill_oddie/tips/farmland.shtmlBill shares his top tips for finding wildlife in farmland1Bill Oddie's Freshwater Wildlife Finding Tipshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/bill_oddie/tips/freshwater.shtmlBill shares his top tips for finding wildlife in freshwater1Bill Oddie's Grassland Wildlife Finding Tipshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/bill_oddie/tips/grassland.shtmlBill shares his top tips for finding wildlife in grassland1Bill Oddie's Heathland Wildlife Finding Tipshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/bill_oddie/tips/heathland.shtmlBill shares his top tips for finding wildlife in urban heathland1Bill Oddie's Mountain Wildlife Finding Tipshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/bill_oddie/tips/mountain.shtmlBill shares his top tips for finding wildlife in the mountains.1Bill Oddie's Urban Wildlife Finding Tipshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/bill_oddie/tips/urban.shtmlBill shares his top tips for finding wildlife in urban areas1Bill Oddie's Woodland Wildlife Finding Tipshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/bill_oddie/tips/woodland.shtmlBill shares his top tips for finding wildlife in woodland1Blue Planet TV serieshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/blueplanetThe complete guide to the Blue Planet TV Series, including a synopsis and video clips from each episode1Blue Planet TV serieshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/blueplanet/biogs.shtmlThe Blue Planet TV series - biographies of the programme producers1Blue Planet TV serieshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/blueplanet/bts.shtmlThe Blue Planet TV series - behind the scenes information1Blue Planet TV serieshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/blueplanet/bts4.shtmlThe Blue Planet TV series - behind the scenes information for programme four.1Blue Planet TV serieshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/blueplanet/bts5.shtmlThe Blue Planet TV series - behind the scenes information for programme five.1Blue Planet TV serieshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/blueplanet/bts6.shtmlThe Blue Planet TV series - behind the scenes information for programme six.1Blue Planet TV serieshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/blueplanet/bts7.shtmlThe Blue Planet TV series - behind the scenes information for programme seven.1Blue Planet TV serieshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/blueplanet/bts8.shtmlThe Blue Planet TV series - behind the scenes information for programme eight.1Blue Planet TV serieshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/blueplanet/experts.shtmlThe Blue Planet TV series - expert opinion on the state of the world's oceans and marine environment1Blue Planet TV serieshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/blueplanet/features1.shtmlExclusive interview with Blue Planet composer George Fenton1Blue Planet TV serieshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/blueplanet/features2.shtmlExclusive interview with Blue Planet blue whale expert Dr Bruce Mate1Blue Planet TV serieshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/blueplanet/features3.shtmlExclusive interviews with Blue Planet contributors Jessie Lane and Kit Rogers1Blue Planet TV serieshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/blueplanet/features4.shtmlExclusive interview with Blue Planet series producer Alastair Fothergill1Blue Planet TV serieshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/blueplanet/features_biog1.shtmlThe Blue Planet TV series - behind the scenes - biography of composer George Fenton1Blue Planet TV serieshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/blueplanet/features_biog2.shtmlThe Blue Planet TV series - behind the scenes - biography of Bruce Mate1Blue Planet TV serieshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/blueplanet/features_biog3.shtmlThe Blue Planet TV series - behind the scenes - biographies of Jessie Lane and Kit Rogers1Blue Planet TV serieshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/blueplanet/features_main.shtmlExclusive interviews with Blue Planet deep-sea animal experts and programme makers1Blue Planet TV serieshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/blueplanet/programme1.shtmlInformation about the Blue Planet TV series introductory programme1Blue Planet TV serieshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/blueplanet/programme2.shtmlInformation about the Blue Planet TV programme on the deep ocean habitat1Blue Planet TV serieshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/blueplanet/programme3.shtmlInformation about the Blue Planet TV programme on the open oceans1Blue Planet TV serieshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/blueplanet/programme4.shtmlInformation about the Blue Planet TV programme on the polar seas1Blue Planet TV serieshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/blueplanet/programme5.shtmlInformation about the Blue Planet TV programme on seasonal marine habitats1Blue Planet TV serieshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/blueplanet/programme6.shtmlInformation about the Blue Planet TV programme on coral habitats1Blue Planet TV serieshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/blueplanet/programme7.shtmlInformation about the Blue Planet TV programme on tidal seas1Blue Planet TV serieshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/blueplanet/programme8.shtmlInformation about the Blue Planet TV programme on coastal habitats1Blue Planet Marine Conservation Linkshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/blueplanet/tips.shtmlBlue Planet producer Jo Sarsby recommends five websites on marine conservation1Science & Nature - Cousinshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/cousinsBBC - Nature - Animals - BBC in the Wild - Nature on television1Science & Nature - Cousinshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/cousins/cousins_charlotte_faq.shtmlBBC - Nature - Animals - BBC in the Wild - Nature on television1Science & Nature - Cousinshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/cousins/cousins_chat.shtmlBBC - Nature - Animals - BBC in the Wild - Nature on television1Science & Nature - Cousinshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/cousins/cousins_map.shtmlBBC - Nature - Animals - BBC in the Wild - Nature on television1Science & Nature - Cousinshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/cousins/cousins_prog1.shtmlBBC - Nature - Animals - BBC in the Wild - Nature on television1Science & Nature - Cousinshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/cousins/cousins_prog2.shtmlBBC - Nature - Animals - BBC in the Wild - Nature on television1Science & Nature - Cousinshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/cousins/cousins_prog3.shtmlBBC - Nature - Animals - BBC in the Wild - Nature on television1Science & Nature - Junglehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/jungle1Virtual Jungle Life Cycleshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/jungle/vjcycles.shtmlThe vital processes that keep the jungle functioning - the water, nutrient, light gap and river erosion cycles1Virtual Junglehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/jungle/vjstructure.shtmlExplore the structure of a jungle from forest floor to canopy and discover the rainforest species and features that make jungles so vital1Virtual Jungle Survivalhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/jungle/vjsurvival.shtmlFrom malarial mosquitoes to carnivorous cats, the jungle is a dangerous place. To cope, animals and people have developed survival strategies for communication, food, movement, defence and shelter.1Virtual Junglehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/jungle/vjungle.shtmlTake a tour round the Flash virtual jungle habitat, an immersive and interactive web application1Life on Air http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/lifeonairDavid Attenborough celebrates 50 years of broadcasting. From the early days when he produced programmes on everything including knitting, through his years in management to his more recent series that he has written and presented. The site includes over an hour of archive video and an exclusive interview for BBC Nature.1Anecdotes http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/lifeonair/anecdotes.shtmlWatch David Attenborough talking about some memorable moments in his 50 years in broadcasting. It includes filming gorillas in Rwanda, presenting standing in a sea of cockroaches and his early life as a boy in Leicster.1Archive http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/lifeonair/archive.shtmlWatch clips from some of David Attenbrough's most well known programmes taken from the programme Life on Air broadcast on BBC1 in December 20031Frequently asked questions http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/lifeonair/faq.shtmlIn an exclusive interview for BBCi Nature David Attenbrough answers the questions users have been asking us to find out. How did his career in broadcasting begin, is there any programme he would still like to produce or has he an ambition left to achieve. Find out here.1Life on Air - Screensaverhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/lifeonair/ssaver.shtmlA selection of photographs from David Attenbrough's private collection have been put together to make a screensaver to celebrate his 50 years in broadcasting1Monsters we Methttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/monsterswemetAn exploration of man's impact on the megafauna of the ancient world1Extinctions and Evidencehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/monsterswemet/balance.shtmlAn exploration of man's impact on the megafauna of the ancient world1Extinctions and Evidencehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/monsterswemet/balance_americas.shtmlAn exploration of man's impact on the megafauna of the ancient world1Extinctions and Evidencehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/monsterswemet/balance_aus.shtmlAn exploration of man's impact on the megafauna of the ancient world1Extinctions and Evidencehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/monsterswemet/balance_europe.shtmlAn exploration of man's impact on the megafauna of the ancient world1Extinctions and Evidencehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/monsterswemet/balance_nz.shtmlAn exploration of man's impact on the megafauna of the ancient world1Monsters we Met - Expertshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/monsterswemet/experts_americas.shtmlWorld experts discuss their views on extinction events1Monsters we Met - Expertshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/monsterswemet/experts_aus.shtmlWorld experts discuss their views on extinction events1Monsters we Met - Expertshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/monsterswemet/experts_europe.shtmlWorld experts discuss their views on extinction events1Monsters we Met - Expertshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/monsterswemet/experts_nz.shtmlWorld experts discuss their views on extinction events1Extinctions and Evidencehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/monsterswemet/extinction.shtmlAn exploration of man's impact on the megafauna of the ancient world1Extinctions and Evidencehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/monsterswemet/extinction_americas.shtmlAn exploration of man's impact on the megafauna of the ancient world1Extinctions and Evidencehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/monsterswemet/extinction_aus.shtmlAn exploration of man's impact on the megafauna of the ancient world1Extinctions and Evidencehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/monsterswemet/extinction_europe.shtmlAn exploration of man's impact on the megafauna of the ancient world1Extinctions and Evidencehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/monsterswemet/extinction_nz.shtmlAn exploration of man's impact on the megafauna of the ancient world1Monsters we Methttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/monsterswemet/faq.shtmlFrequently asked questions about the Monsters we Met series on BBC21Extinctions and Evidencehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/monsterswemet/other_causes.shtmlAn exploration of man's impact on the megafauna of the ancient world1Extinctions and Evidencehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/monsterswemet/other_causes_americas.shtmlAn exploration of man's impact on the megafauna of the ancient world1Extinctions and Evidencehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/monsterswemet/other_causes_aus.shtmlAn exploration of man's impact on the megafauna of the ancient world1Extinctions and Evidencehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/monsterswemet/other_causes_europe.shtmlAn exploration of man's impact on the megafauna of the ancient world1Extinctions and Evidencehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/monsterswemet/other_causes_nz.shtmlAn exploration of man's impact on the megafauna of the ancient world1About the Serieshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/monsterswemet/programmes.shtmlAn exploration of man's impact on the megafauna of the ancient world1State of the Planethttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/state_planetBBC - Nature - Earth - State of the planet1State of the Planet - Interviewhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/state_planet/attenborough.shtmlBBC - Nature - Earth - State of the Planet1State of the Planet expertshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/state_planet/experts.shtmlBBC - Nature - Earth - Home Page1State of the Planet - Fragmentationhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/state_planet/frag.shtmlBBC - Nature - Earth - State of the planet1Habitat losshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/state_planet/habitat.shtmlBBC - Nature - Earth - State of the planet1Introduced specieshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/state_planet/intro.shtmlBBC - Nature - Earth - State of the planet1State of the Planet - Over-harvestinghttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/state_planet/over.shtmlBBC - Nature - Earth - State of the planet1State of the Planet - Pollutionhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/state_planet/pollution.shtmlBBC - Nature - Earth - Home Page1State of the Planet programmeshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/state_planet/programmes.shtmlBBC - Nature - Earth - State of the planet1State of the Planet screensaverhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/state_planet/screensaver.shtmlBBC - Nature - Earth - State of the planet1Talking with Animals http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/talkingCharlotte Uhlenbroek presents Talking with Animals, a fascinating series on BBC1 exploring the complex world of animal communication. Watch video clips of animals in action communicating in some bizarre ways1Talking with Animals http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/talking/fasc_facts.shtmlCharlotte Uhlenbroek presents Talking with Animals, a fascinating series on BBC1 exploring the complex world of animal communication. Watch video clips of animals in action communicating in some bizarre ways1Talking with Animals http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/talking/fasc_facts2.shtmlCharlotte Uhlenbroek presents Talking with Animals, a fascinating series on BBC1 exploring the complex world of animal communication. Watch video clips of animals in action communicating in some bizarre ways1Talking with Animals http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/talking/fasc_facts3.shtmlCharlotte Uhlenbroek presents Talking with Animals, a fascinating series on BBC1 exploring the complex world of animal communication. Watch video clips of animals in action communicating in some bizarre ways1Talking with Animals http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/talking/fasc_facts4.shtmlCharlotte Uhlenbroek presents Talking with Animals, a fascinating series on BBC1 exploring the complex world of animal communication. Watch video clips of animals in action communicating in some bizarre ways1Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafricaafrica, continent, explore, african, wildlife, biogeography, habitat, geography, filming, diary1Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/biogeography.shtmlDiscover the variety of habitats found on the continent of Africa from jungle to desert.1Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/casamance.shtmlA profile of the Casamance River and its wildlife.1Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/congo.shtmlA profile of the Congo River System and its wildlife1Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/contprofile.shtmlafrican geology, continent, physical features, aerial photographs, habitats1Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/diary.shtmlRead the diaries of the Wild Africa team from the 18 months it took to film the series.1Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/diary_apr.shtmlRead the April diary from the Wild Africa programme team.1Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/diary_aug.shtmlRead the August diary from the Wild Africa programme team and find out about the people working from the BBC's Natural History Unit in Bristol.1Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/diary_dec.shtmlRead the December diary from the Wild Africa programme team from Lake Malawi, the Namib desert and the Serengeti.1Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/diary_feb.shtmlRead the February diary from the Wild Africa programme team from the Simien Mountains to Mali. Find out what special equipment and extra care is needed to film animals at night.1Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/diary_jan.shtmlRead the January diary from the Wild Africa programme team from South Africa to the Atlas mountains of Morocco.1Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/diary_jul.shtmlRead the July diary from the Wild Africa programme team, from magroves to the thundering Zambesi.1Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/diary_jun.shtmlRead the June diary from the Wild Africa programme team from volcanoes to mountains.1Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/diary_mar.shtmlRead the March diary from the Wild Africa programme team in west and central Africa and Ethiopia.1Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/diary_may.shtmlRead the May diary from the Wild Africa programme team, filming the wildebeest rut.1Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/diary_nov.shtmlRead the November diary from the Wild Africa programme team.1Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/diary_oct.shtmlRead the October diary from the Wild Africa programme team.1Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/diary_sep.shtmlRead the September diary from the Wild Africa programme team including filming manta rays feeding off the coast of Sudan.1Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/factfiles/factfiles.shtmlNo description available1Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/granderg.shtmlA profile of the Grand Erg Occidental and its wildlife.1Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/kilimanjaro.shtmlA profile of Kilimanjaro and its wildlife.1Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/lakeasal.shtmlA profile of Lake Asal and its wildlife.1Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/lakenatron.shtmlA profile of Lake Natron and its wildlife.1Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/laketanganyika.shtmlA profile of Lake Tanganyika one of Africa's extraordinary landmarks and wildlife areas.1Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/namibdesert.shtmlA profile of the Namib Desert and its wildlife.1Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/ngorongoro.shtmlA profile of Nogorongoro one of Africa's extraordinary landmarks and wildlife areas.1Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/nigerriver.shtmlA profile of the River Niger and its wildlife.1Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/nile.shtmlA profile of the Nile Delta and Valley and its wildlife.1Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/nile_blue.shtmlA profile of the Blue Nile and its wildlife.1Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/nile_white.shtmlA profile of the White Nile and its wildlife1Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/okavango.shtmlA profile of the Okavango Delta and its wildlife.1<url>http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/picpops</url><description>No description available</description><color>1</color><sources/><children><node><title>Science & Nature -Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/picpops/diary_sep_pop4.shtmlNo description available1Science & Nature -Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/picpops/diary_apr_pop1.shtmlNo description available1Science & Nature -Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/picpops/diary_dec_pop1.shtmlNo description available1Science & Nature -Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/picpops/diary_dec_pop2.shtmlNo description available1Science & Nature -Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/picpops/diary_jan_pop1.shtmlNo description available1Science & Nature -Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/picpops/diary_jan_pop2.shtmlNo description available1Science & Nature -Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/picpops/diary_jan_pop3.shtmlNo description available1Science & Nature -Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/picpops/diary_jan_pop4.shtmlNo description available1Science & Nature -Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/picpops/diary_jan_pop5.shtmlNo description available1Science & Nature -Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/picpops/diary_jul_pop1.shtmlNo description available1Science & Nature -Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/picpops/diary_jun_pop1.shtmlNo description available1Science & Nature -Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/picpops/diary_mar_pop1.shtmlNo description available1Science & Nature -Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/picpops/diary_nov_pop1.shtmlNo description available1Science & Nature -Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/picpops/diary_nov_pop2.shtmlNo description available1Science & Nature -Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/picpops/diary_nov_pop3.shtmlNo description available1Science & Nature -Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/picpops/diary_sep_pop1.shtmlNo description available1Science & Nature -Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/picpops/diary_sep_pop2.shtmlNo description available1Science & Nature -Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/picpops/diary_sep_pop5.shtmlNo description available1Science & Nature -Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/picpops/diary_sep_pop6.shtmlNo description available1Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/quiz/wildafrica_quizstart.shtmlnature, film making, radio, animals, wildlife programmes, presenter, nature online, programmes, wildlife, natural, bbc, radio, radio 4, programmes, vets, television, preview, environment, broadcast, natural history, wildlife video, nick baker, michaela strachan, steve leonard, trude mostue, rolf harris, kate humble, sir david attenborough, david attenborough, vets in practice, wildlife on one, wild, natural world, animal hospital1Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/quiz_fun.shtmlDownload Wild Africa screensavers, play the video quiz or take the simple quiz1Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/richatbullseye.shtmlrichat bullseye, mauretania1Wild Africahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildafrica/video_quiz.shtmlnature, film making, radio, animals, wildlife programmes, presenter, nature online, programmes, wildlife, natural, bbc, radio, radio 4, programmes, vets, television, preview, environment, broadcast, natural history, wildlife video, nick baker, michaela strachan, steve leonard, trude mostue, rolf harris, kate humble, sir david attenborough, david attenborough, vets in practice, wildlife on one, wild, natural world, animal hospital1Wild Down Underhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wilddownunderVirtual multimedia exploration of the natural wonders and unique wildlife of the continent of Australasia1Wild Down Underhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wilddownunder/soundquizExplore the natural wonders of the continent of Australasia and discover its unique wildlife through a multimedia virtual tour1Wild Down Underhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wilddownunder/virtual.shtmlA virtual wildlife tour of Australia, New Zealand and Papua New Guinea also showing the origins of the Australasian continent from Gondwana1Tropical rainforesthttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wilddownunder/virtual01.shtmlExploring Australasia through aerial video and wildlife clips revealing the sights and sounds of Australia's tropical rainforest1Wild Down Under - Rivershttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wilddownunder/virtual02.shtmlExploring Australasia through aerial video and wildlife clips revealing the sights and sounds of the rivers of south-east Australia1New Zealandhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wilddownunder/virtual03.shtmlExploring Australasia through aerial video and wildlife clips revealing the sights and sounds of New Zealand1New Guineahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wilddownunder/virtual04.shtmlExploring Australasia through aerial video and wildlife clips revealing the sights and sounds of New Guinea and the surrounding Pacific islands1Wild Down Under - Kakaduhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wilddownunder/virtual05.shtmlExploring Australia through aerial video and wildlife clips revealing the sights and sounds of Kakadu in the Northern Territory1The Alpshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wilddownunder/virtual06.shtmlExploring Australia through aerial video and wildlife clips revealing the sights and sounds of the south east Australian Alps1Uluru and the Red Centrehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wilddownunder/virtual07.shtmlExploring Australasia through aerial video and wildlife clips revealing the sights and sounds of the central Australian desert1Lake Eyrehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wilddownunder/virtual08.shtmlExploring Australasia through aerial video and wildlife clips revealing the sights and sounds of the salt lake, Lake Eyre1Shark Bayhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wilddownunder/virtual09.shtmlExploring Australasia through aerial video and wildlife clips revealing the sights and sounds of Shark Bay of Western Australia1Great Barrier Reefhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wilddownunder/virtual10.shtmlExploring Australasia through aerial video and wildlife clips revealing the sights and sounds of the Great Barrier Reef1Wild Down Under - Gondwanahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wilddownunder/virtual12.shtmlThe formation of the Australasian continent from the super-continent, Gondwana1Wild New Worldhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildnewworldA journey into North America's ancient natural history1Wild New World - Ancestorshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildnewworld/ancestors.shtmlWhere did the first people to settle in North America come from and how did they get there?1Wild New World - Animalshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildnewworld/animals_past_present.shtmlThe animals of modern and prehistoric North America1Lost Heritagehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildnewworld/animals_past_present2.shtmlThe extinction debate over the prehistoric animals of ice age North America1Wild New World - Evidencehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildnewworld/evidence.shtmlClues used to recreate the wildlife and landscapes of ice age North America1Wild New Worldhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/tv/wildnewworld/then_now.shtmlWildlife televison from the BBC's Natural History Unit1Alan Titchmarshhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/who/alan_titchmarsh.shtmlA biography of Alan Titchmarsh, gardener, writer and presenter of Bristish Isles: A Natural History.1Bill Oddiehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/who/bill_oddie.shtmlA biography of Bill Oddie, from his early career in the Cambridge footlights to how he got involved in wildlife programme making.1Charlotte Uhlenbroekhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/who/charlotte_uhlenbroek.shtmlBiography of Dr Charlotte Uhlenbroek. Find out how she spent her early years in Kathmandu before going on to study primates and finally to presenting natural history tv programmes.1Chris Baineshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/who/chris_baines.shtmlBiography of Chris Baines; wildlife tv presenter, conservationist and gardener.1David Attenboroughhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/who/david_attenborough.shtmlA biography of David Attenborough. From David Attenborough's early pioneering programmes to the introduction of colour tv and landmark series such as The Blue Planet.1Jamie Darlinghttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/who/jamie_darling.shtmlThe who's who of the natural world featuring presenters of the BBC's natural history programmes.1John Cravenhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/who/john_craven.shtmlA biography of John Craven, from Newsround to Countryfile.1Jonathan Scotthttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/who/jonathan_scott.shtmlA biography of Jonathan Scott, presenter of big cat diary. Discover how Jonathan's love of African wildlife developed.1Kate Humblehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/who/kate_humble.shtmlA biography of Kate Humble, presenter of Springwatch, Autumnwatch, Rough Science and Holiday.1Michaela Strachanhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/who/michaela_strachan.shtmlA biography of Michaela Strachan from Wacaday to the Really Wild Show.1Sir Patrick Moorehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/who/patrick_moore.shtmlA biography of Sir Patrick Moore, presenter of The Sky at Night and author of numerous books about astronomy. Patrick is also a self-taught musician and composer.1Rolf Harrishttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/who/rolf_harris.shtmlA biography of Rolf Harris. Rolf presented Animal Hospital for nine years. He is a talented artist and musician.1Saba Douglas-Hamilton http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/who/saba_douglashamilton.shtmlA biography of Saba Douglas-Hamilton. Saba grew up in Kenya and went on to work on a number of natural history tv productions including Big Cat diary.1Simon Kinghttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/who/simon_king.shtmlA biography of Simon King. From Simon's early films to presenting and filming programmes such as Big Cat Diary.1Steve Leonardhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/programmes/who/steve_leonard.shtmlA biography of Steve Leonard. Steve was first filmed while he was still at college as part of Vets School, he went on to present prpgrammes such as Animal Camera and Extreme Animals.1Wildlife Finder - Specieshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/speciesA species is a group of organisms that can interbreed and produce healthy offspring which can themselves breed. Wolves and dogs can produce fertile puppies, so they are both the same species (Canis lupus), but mules are usually sterile so horses and donkeys are different species. Asexual species, such as hydras, are defined by their body shape, as are many fossil species, which - being dead - obviously can't breed with anything any more.1Aardvark (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/AardvarkAardvarks are the only living member of the order Tubulidentata. Due to their elusive lifestyle, they are also one of the least known of all mammals.1Adelie penguin (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Adelie_PenguinAdelie penguins are found in the Southern Ocean round Antarctica. They breed further south than any other penguin, venturing about 100 km (60 miles) from the sea to their nest sites on the Antarctic mainland. The males and females take turns to incubate the egg and feed the chick while their partner is out at sea.1Desert rose (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/AdeniumDesert roses are colourful flowering plants native to the dry climates of sub-Saharan Africa and the Arabian penisula. The stem and root swells up to store water from the summer rains for the long dry winter ahead. Desert rose species, and a handful of subspecies, vary widely from short, fat trees to small shrubs, depending on their location. All have a highly toxic sap which is used by local people to coat arrow tips for hunting. Unrelated to the rose family, these are also popular house plants.1African buffalo (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/African_BuffaloAfrican buffalos are stocky members of the cow family. The females form protective herds whilst the males are mostly solitary. Members of the herd are thought to 'vote' on which direction the herd should move.1African bush elephant (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/African_Bush_ElephantAfrican bush elephants are the largest living land mammals. The biggest ever recorded was a bull that weighed 10 tonnes and stood 4m at the shoulder. As well as being physically striking, African elephants have remarkably complex and interesting social lives. Since forest elephants were recognised as a separate species, African elephants have been referred to as savannah or bush elephants.1African fish eagle (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/African_Fish_EagleAfrican fish eagles are familar birds of prey on the waterways of sub-Saharan Africa, noted for their distinctive and haunting call. These eagles perch on branches overlooking the water, swooping down to catch fish which are then carried back to the perch or dragged to shore if too big to carry. African fish eagles also eat birds, monkeys and even crocodile hatchlings. These efficient predators can get away with spending as little as 10 minutes a day actively hunting.1Forest elephant (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/African_Forest_ElephantForest elephants were thought to be a subspecies of the African elephant, but recent research has discovered that they are a separate species. Forest elephants have straighter tusks and more rounded ears than African savannah elephants. They have five toes on the forefeet and four toes on the hindfeet, as Asian elephants do.1African wild dog (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/African_Wild_DogAfrican wild dogs have markings that are unique to each individual, like fingerprints, and help the pack identify each other. The markings may also help the dogs to blend in with the pack, so that prey species cannot determine how many dogs are present.1Agile gibbon (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Agile_GibbonAgile gibbons rarely come down from the treetops in the southeast Asian rainforests they inhabit. It's often easy to spot these gibbons as both sexes have striking white eyebrows that stand out against their dark fur, but it is only the males that have the characteristic white cheek pouches. Once mated, agile gibbons stay together for life and form a family group with their offspring. They sing in the early morning as a way of establishing and defending their territory.1Black lace-weaver (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Amaurobius_feroxBlack lace-weaver spiders can be found under stones and logs in the woodlands and gardens of Europe and North America. Look out in cellars and outbuildings, or other dark areas of your home, as these spiders have been known to deliver a painful bite. The dutiful mother guards her eggs and once her spiderlings have hatched she makes the ultimate sacrifice... to become their first meal.1Amazonian manatee (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Amazonian_ManateeAmazonian manatees live in freshwater and are found, as their name suggests, in the Amazon River and its tributaries. They eat prodigious amounts of aquatic plants, consuming up to 8% of their own body weight every day. In the dry season, when manatees are forced to leave smaller watercourses as they shrink, they may fast for several weeks, surviving on fat reserves.1American bison (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/American_BisonAmerican bison are the largest land mammals in North America. Massive herds once roamed far and wide across the grasslands and savannas of north America, from Alaska all the way down to Mexico. Nowadays, herds are largely restricted to reserves and parks. Despite the bison's poor eyesight, danger is still detected well in advance, because they have excellent senses of hearing and smell. However, the formidable size and defences of the adults also keep them very safe. Bison calves are capable of walking and even running hours after being born.1Black bear (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/American_Black_BearBlack bears are one of the three species of bear found in North America. If running away from an American black bear, the last thing you want to do is climb a tree - they are expert climbers! Fortunately, they are less aggressive than some other bear species.1American black vulture (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/American_Black_VultureAmerican black vultures are more aggressive than turkey vultures and often drive the latter away from carcasses. If frightened while on the ground, black vultures vomit anything they've just eaten to reduce their weight for a quicker take-off.1Andean condor (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Andean_CondorAndean condors are one of the largest flying birds in the world. Their wingspan can reach 3.2m and they can weigh as much as 15kg. Young condors do not learn to fly until they are six months old.1Andean hillstar (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Andean_HillstarAndean Hillstars survive the sub zero temperatures of the high Andes by going into torpor at night, like a mini hibernation. They roost where the rising sun's rays will catch them and warm them into waking again in the morning.1Slow worm (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Anguis_fragilisSlow worms look superficially like snakes, but are actually legless lizards. One way to identify them is to see if they have eyelids. Lizards (and therefore slow worms) do while snakes are lidless.1Antarctic fur seal (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Antarctic_Fur_SealAntarctic fur seals are one of the eared seals from the same family as sea lions, rather than one of the true seals like the common seal seen in the UK. Antarctic fur seals feast primarily on tiny krill, but they also hunt fish and squid.1Spotted python (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Antaresia_maculosaSpotted pythons are small Australian pythons that prefer to live in caves and crevices. They are adept at catching flying bats in the dark recesses of their caves.1Pirarucu (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/ArapaimaPirarucus have teeth on their tongues and on the roof of their mouths. The prey of adults pirarucu is other fish, but the juveniles have a more diverse diet.1Arctic fox (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Arctic_FoxArctic foxes live in some of the planet's most extreme conditions. An arsenal of cold-conquering adaptations helps them survive temperatures that plummet below -50 degrees Celsius. These include the animal kingdom's best insulating fur and increased blood circulation to the feet which stops the fox's paws freezing to the ice. They range far and wide in the arctic and alpine tundra, but home dens are important and may be used for centuries by subsequent generations. Lemmings are such an important part of their diet that arctic fox populations can be greatly affected by their availablity.1Arctic ground squirrel (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Arctic_Ground_SquirrelArctic ground squirrels shelter in shallow burrows on the tundra, usually inhabiting areas where the permafrost does not prevent digging. To survive the harsh arctic winters, they hibernate for seven months of the year, during which time their body temperature can sink below freezing.1Arctic skua (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Arctic_SkuaArctic skuas pair up and defend feeding territories from their neighbours in the Arctic, but elsewhere they form colonies with small territories within them. As well as squabbling with the neighbours, they steal fish from other birds such as terns and puffins.1Argali sheep (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/ArgaliArgalis are the world's largest sheep and their dramatic spiralling corkscrew horns mean they are also a big hunter’s prize. During winter, the usually segregated sexes descend from the heights of their summer grazing grounds up on the Tibetan Plateau, for example, and convene to begin the rut.1Giant river turtle (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/ArrauGiant river turtles lay their eggs on sandbanks and riverbanks when the water level in the river is low. Any unhatched eggs are drowned when the river level rises again.1Asian elephant (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Asian_ElephantAsian elephants are smaller than their African counterparts, most easily noted in their ear size. They are more readily tamed than African elephants and have been used as beasts of burden for centuries. Despite their size, their charge speed can reach nearly 50kmph. Wild bulls are solitary, while cows and calves live in small herds. Though the adult Asian elephant has no natural predators, there are only around 50,000 left in the wild.1Atlantic sailfish (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Atlantic_sailfishAtlantic sailfish are found in tropical and temperate parts of the Atlantic Ocean, though juveniles have been found in the Mediterranean Sea. Adults can weigh up to 60kg. Females grow larger than the males.1Giant cuttlefish (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Australian_Giant_CuttlefishThe Australian giant cuttlefish is the largest of the world’s hundred or so species of cuttlefish. It can grow to lengths of about a metre and weigh over 10kg (22 pounds). Like all cephalopods, it is carnivorous.1Aye-aye (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Aye-ayeAye-ayes are the largest nocturnal primate in the world. They are also the only primate thought to use echolocation, which they use to find insect grubs hidden 2cm deep inside a tree. During mating, aye-ayes hang upside-down on a branch, and the procedure lasts for about an hour.1Bactrian camel (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Bactrian_CamelBactrian camels can store large amounts of fat in their two humps, allowing them to survive periods when food is scarce.1Baikal seal (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Baikal_SealBaikal seals are the world's only completely freshwater seal. They live around Lake Baikal, the deepest lake in the world.1Bald uakari (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Bald_UakariBald uakaris have red faces that are a symbol of good health, and those with malaria have paler faces than those who are immune. This enables the monkeys to choose the healthiest mate to breed with.1Banded demoiselle (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Banded_DemoiselleBanded demoiselles are a type of damselfly. Although their larvae are aquatic, flight is the key to success for adult banded demoiselles. Males compete on the wing for breeding territories. And a territory owner will then court any visiting female by doing a special display flight for her.1Banded mongoose (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Banded_MongooseBanded mongooses are native to Africa and distributed far and wide south of the Sahara. They live in most places except the dry desert areas. Pack life is important to these small carnivores, who communally look after and protect the young, elderly and injured. The pack wanders between dens, moving to another every three to four days. The characteristic sniffing and scratching while foraging for food is typically done individually, but sometimes there is co-operation to bring down larger prey such as snakes.1Bar-headed goose (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Bar-headed_GooseBar-headed geese have to reach extreme heights when they migrate over the Himalayas. To be able to do this, the species is physiologically and biochemically adapted to flying at altitudes where oxygen levels and temperatures are both extremely low.1Barnacle goose (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Barnacle_GooseBarnacle geese migrate to Britain and Ireland in the winter, to escape the harsher climates of Greenland and Svalbard Island. The sudden appearance of the adult geese, with no prior sign of nesting or goslings, gave rise in folklore to the story that barnacle geese either grew on trees or developed from the goose barnacles found on driftwood.1Barn owl (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Barn_OwlBarn owls have over 30 subspecies and, with a few exceptions, they are distributed world-wide. The barn owls which live further north in Europe are a darker shade than the race found in the UK. Barn owls do not hoot, instead they emit a long, eerie screech (its alternative name is the screech owl). They also hiss, snore and yap. As well as rodents, they eat other small mammals, such as young rabbits and moles, and they also catch frogs and small birds.1Swallow (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Barn_SwallowSwallows are adapted for a life on the wing where they catch insects through agile flight. They are migratory and flock in large numbers in September ready to fly to Africa, south of the Sahara. They return to the UK in early April, often roosting communally in reedbeds outside of the breeding season.1<url>http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Bear</url><description>No description available</description><color>1</color><sources/></node><node><title>Lammergeier (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Bearded_VultureLammergeiers are long-winged vultures known for their unusual habit of dropping bones on to rocks to smash them open and get at the marrow. They have a widespread distribution in the mountains of Europe, Asia and Africa, and are common in the mountainous highlands of Ethiopia.1Beluga whale (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Beluga_%28whale%29Belugas come together in pods of hundreds and even thousands of individuals in the shallow waters of the arctic and sub-arctic seas. For insulation in these cold waters these whales have 10cm thick blubber and half their weight is fat. Beluga whales are very vocal: their chirps, squeaks and clicks are so distinctive they're nicknamed 'sea canaries'.1Beluga whale (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Beluga_(whale)Belugas come together in pods of hundreds and even thousands of individuals in the shallow waters of the arctic and sub-arctic seas. For insulation in these cold waters these whales have 10cm thick blubber and half their weight is fat. Beluga whales are very vocal: their chirps, squeaks and clicks are so distinctive they're nicknamed 'sea canaries'.1Bighorn sheep (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Bighorn_SheepBighorn sheep are all about those famous massive spiralled horns. In the males, they are particularly heavy and can reach over a metre in length. They are the primary weapon during some spectacular clashes over the females and horn size dictates position in the herd. Bighorn sheep are found on the grassy alpine meadows and foothills of some of America's greatest mountain ranges. They're never far from the safety of some rocky cliffs and buffs where agile leaping and bounding between impossibly narrow ledges lets them escape potential predators with ease.1Black-banded sea krait (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Black-banded_sea_kraitBlack-banded sea kraits are highly venomous snakes that live and hunt in reefs using their bite to paralyse prey. Newly-hatched kraits eat sand smelts and sand perches, but as they grow they switch to other prey, such as surgeonfish and damselfish. They are slower swimmers than their prey, so tend to ambush fish amongst the coral rather than hunt them in a chase.1Black-footed rock-wallaby (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Black-flanked_Rock-wallabyBlack-footed wallabies are agile creatures that are the kangaroo family's equivalent of a mountain goat. Their very long tails help them to keep their balance when jumping on cliffs and rock faces. They also have 'non-slip' soles on their feet to help them keep their grip.1Kittiwake (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Black-legged_KittiwakeThe black-legged kittiwake is very widespread, being found in coastal regions throughout the northern hemisphere. Unlike other gulls, it rarely comes far inland, and it does not feed at landfill sites. Kittiwakes nest on cliffs, even when the rock appears to be perilously smooth. Males lay claim to a nest site and return there year after year.1Black-tailed prairie dog (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Black-tailed_Prairie_DogBlack-tailed prairie dogs are burrowing rodents that live on the North American grassy plains and prairies in a range that stretches from Canada to Mexico. Despite habitat loss and vilification by ranchers, these are still the most common and widespread of the prairie dogs. A very important prey species, their enormous colonies are attractive to predators looking for an easy meal. However, with constant look-outs posted on mounds these little creatures aren't easy to catch unawares. Black-tailed prairie dogs don't hibernate during the cold winter weather, unlike most other prairie dog species.1Black-throated diver (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Black-throated_LoonBlack-throated divers are the only member of the diver bird family to have a white patch on the flank. They breed on the lakes and lochs of Europe and Asia but winter at sea off sheltered coasts. Sitting low in the water with their legs a long way back on the body they are streamlined swimmers and skillful divers, at a cost of not being able to walk well on land. Artificial floating islands have helped these birds breed where water levels are changeable.1Blackberry (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/BlackberryBlackberries - also known as brambles - are related to raspberries and the two plants have been crossed to produce hybrids such as the loganberry. Wild blackberries are a common feature of British hedgerows, woodlands and waste ground. In autumn their fruits are a source of food for thrushes, blackbirds and other animals.1Black-crested gibbon (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Black_Crested_GibbonBlack-crested gibbons are one of the most endangered primates on Earth, because 75% of their habitat has been destroyed. They survive in isolated pockets in China, Laos and Vietnam, oten in places that are almost entirely inaccessible for humans, and are famous for their melodic yodelling songs.1Black grouse (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Black_GrouseBlack grouse are distinctive looking gamebirds of northern Europe's woodland and moorland. Like their close relatives, capercaillies, male black grouse put on an impressive display in the breeding season. At dawn, the males gather to inflate their necks, raise their tails and make a bubbling 'rookooing' sound. At stake is the chance to mate with more of the watching females than any of the other males. Black grouse are also known as blackcocks and greyhens, because of the colour of the male and female birds respectively.1Black mamba (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Black_mambaBlack mambas actually come in a variety of colours, from pale grey to beige. Their name is derived from the colour of their mouths rather than their skin. Highly venomous and feared throughout their range, black mambas are famed for being the fastest and most dangerous snakes in Africa. The mamba's venom contains a powerful neurotoxin which works by preventing impulses from travelling along the nerves. The victim becomes paralysed and death occurs through respiratory failure.1Black Rhinoceros (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Black_RhinocerosBlack rhinoceroses are about the same height at the shoulder as African buffalos, but are twice as heavy. Despite their weight, they are nimble on their feet, and can run at 50kph and make sharp turns at the gallop.1Yunnan snub-nosed monkey (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Black_Snub-nosed_MonkeyYunnan snub-nosed monkeys live at the highest altitude of any primate, except for humans. The forests they live in are 3,000-4,500m above sea level, and they wander far and wide in search of food.1Blue bird of paradise (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Blue_Bird_of_ParadiseBlue birds of paradise are one of the most beautiful of the bird of paradise species. Their bright blue feathers are a welcome addition to the green foliage of the tropical forests of Papua New Guinea. The males are adorned with two long and delicate streaming tail feathers. To impress the females, they show off by hanging upside down from a branch and fanning out their wings - it is a spectacular display.1Blue whale (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Blue_WhaleBlue whales are the largest animals ever to have lived - bigger, even, than the largest of the dinosaurs. Yet they are elusive creatures, and surprisingly little is known about their lives.1Blue wildebeest (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Blue_WildebeestBlue wildebeest are the commonly seen grazing antelopes that live in huge herds on the plains of Africa and undertake spectacular migrations. Newborn wildebeest can stand as soon as three minutes after birth, and soon after can follow their mothers.1Buff-tailed bumblebee (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Bombus_terrestrisBuff-tailed bumblebees are the UK's largest bumblebee species. The queen is the only one that has the buff-coloured tail, the workers all have white tails. The queen emerges in the spring after hibernating through the winter, and goes looking for a nest site. At the height of its success, a buff-tailed bumblebee colony may contain 150 workers.1Bongo (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Bongo_%28antelope%29Bongos are the largest and most spectacular of the African forest antelopes. The main population is in west Africa, however, a much smaller and critically endangered subspecies is found in the mountain forests of Kenya. Bongos are well equipped for a life in the forest - impressive, long, spiralling horns can be used to break branches and a long flexible tongue can grasp leaves with ease. Despite their bold appearance, bongos are shy and reclusive animals that stay out of sight in the cover of the forest during the day.1Bongo (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Bongo_(antelope)Bongos are the largest and most spectacular of the African forest antelopes. The main population is in west Africa, however, a much smaller and critically endangered subspecies is found in the mountain forests of Kenya. Bongos are well equipped for a life in the forest - impressive, long, spiralling horns can be used to break branches and a long flexible tongue can grasp leaves with ease. Despite their bold appearance, bongos are shy and reclusive animals that stay out of sight in the cover of the forest during the day.1Bonobo (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/BonoboBonobos are found only within the Democratic Republic of Congo in Central Africa. Together with common chimpanzees, they are man's closest living relatives. Sex is an everyday affair in bonobo society, and is liberally used to create bonds between individuals, as well as for reproduction. That said, during periods of rest grooming is the activity of choice, and is thought to provide group cohesion and ease tension. Bonobos are born helpless, and females provide the majority of the parental care, since paternity is usually unclear.1Bornean orangutan (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Bornean_OrangutanBornean orangutans live in the canopy of Borneo's tropical rain forests. Fruit is the most important component of their diet, but they also feed on insects, small vertebrates, leaves and bark. The estimated population of Bornean orangutans is only 12,000-15,000.1Northern bottlenose whale (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Bottlenose_whaleNorthern bottlenose whales are one of the most inquisitive of the beaked whales. They often approach boats, which makes them easy to study - and in the past, easy to hunt. Hundreds of thousands were killed, and their habit of staying with wounded companions meant that whole pods were slaughtered. They had their population significantly reduced by whaling, but are now a protected species and their numbers will hopefully recover.1Brants's whistling rat (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Brants%27s_Whistling_RatBrants's whistling rats are one of two whistling rat species that live in southern Africa. Their whistle is an alarm call to warn of an approaching predator.1Brants's whistling rat (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Brants's_Whistling_RatBrants's whistling rats are one of two whistling rat species that live in southern Africa. Their whistle is an alarm call to warn of an approaching predator.1Broadley's flat lizard (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Broadley%27s_Flat_LizardBroadley's flat lizards are one of the species of flat lizard that's confined to small, distinct areas in South Africa. They are very colourful and able to make impressive leaps, a technique they put to good use in catching black flies as they swarm overhead.1Broadley's flat lizard (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Broadley's_Flat_LizardBroadley's flat lizards are one of the species of flat lizard that's confined to small, distinct areas in South Africa. They are very colourful and able to make impressive leaps, a technique they put to good use in catching black flies as they swarm overhead.1Brown-throated sloth (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Brown-throated_SlothBrown-throated sloths are the most common of the three-toed sloths. Physiologically, three-toed sloths are more like reptiles than mammals, as they do not keep their body temperature constant, but let it fluctuate as the external temperature goes up and down. This means they can only live in the tropics.1Brown basilisk (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Brown_basiliskBrown basilisks are one of the lizards nicknamed the 'Jesus lizard' for their ability to rise up on their hind legs and walk - or rather run - on water. They can only manage this feat on still water, and only for short distances.1Brown bear (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Brown_bearBrown bears are second only in size to polar bears. They are among the largest living land carnivores - although their diet is really omnivorous. A subspecies called the Kodiak bear is particularly impressive, and can reach similar sizes to its polar cousin.1Brown fur seal (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Brown_Fur_SealBrown fur seals are one of the larger fur seals and rather similar to many sealions. There are two sub-species the South African or Cape fur seal, and the Australian fur seal of south eastern Australia and Tasmania. These seals spend most of the year at sea and show obvious sexual dimorphism - the males are considerably larger than the females.1Brown trout (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Brown_troutBrown trout start life on a diet of invertebrates, but later on some of them switch to eating fish. These larger, predatory individuals are sometimes known as ferox trout, and were once thought to be a different species.1Common woolly monkey (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Brown_Woolly_MonkeyCommon woolly monkeys have a sturdy prehensile tail, which they use to hang from branches and occasionally to pick things up. When they descend from the trees to the ground - not a common occurrence - they sometimes walk bi-pedally on their hind legs.1Brush-tailed rock wallaby (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Brush-tailed_Rock-wallabyBrush-tailed rock wallabies are agile marsupials native to Australia and introduced into New Zealand and Hawaii. They live in small colonies around rocky areas and outcrops, leaping and clambering around the rugged landscapes with ease. Their agility is aided by tough and flexible hind feet for grip and a long, bushy tail for balance. These rock wallabies are mostly active at dawn and dusk (crepuscular) and they spend the day resting and sunning themselves on the rocks.1Buff-faced Pygmy Parrot (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Buff-faced_Pygmy_ParrotNo description available1Buff-necked ibis (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Buff-necked_IbisBuff-necked ibises are a fairly common South American species. As with many ibis species, their call is loud and piercing, and used in raucous duet during courtship.1Burrowing owl (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Burrowing_OwlBurrowing owls are closely related to the British little owl, and live in North and South America. They differ from other owls since they are active mainly in the daytime, and the female is smaller than the male.1Burrowing parrot (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Burrowing_ParakeetBurrowing parrots need cliffs of soft sandstone or limestone to dig their nest holes. Their numbers have declined in many areas owing to their habit of raiding crops.1California mouse (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/California_MouseCalifornia mice live in Mexico and, of course, California where they hole up in ready-made burrows. These are no ordinary mice, and once mated a pair will stay together for life, with the males spending a great deal of time in caring and protecting for the young. This large-eared rodent is also an excellent climber and can often be found in the trees of its forest and woodland homes.1Cape dwarf chameleon (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Cape_Dwarf_ChameleonCape dwarf chameleons are only to be found in the grasses and shrubs of South Africa's Western Province. There is a great variety in body markings and colours amongst individuals, from vibrant greens and yellows to dull browns and a light coloured stripe on the flank. The young of these active chameleons are born live and are identical miniatures of their parents. It's now thought that the once many sub-species are in fact entirely separate species.1Cape gannet (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Cape_GannetCape gannets breed on islands off the coast of Nambia and South Africa. They build their nests out of droppings, with a few bones and feathers mixed in.1Capybara (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/CapybaraCapybaras are huge grazing rodents that live in herds and are semi-aquatic. They can purr and bark and, like rabbits, they eat their own dung to extract maximum nutrition from their food.1Cheetah (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/CheetahCheetahs are the fastest animals on land. Reaching speeds of over 100kph (almost 65 mph), they can easily outrun any animal over short distances. Amazingly, the cheetah's speed was not accurately measured until 1997.1Chinese alligator (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Chinese_AlligatorChinese alligators spend the winter hibernating in burrows.1Chinese giant salamander (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Chinese_giant_salamanderChinese giant salamanders are the largest of the world's salamanders and can reach 1.8m in length. Despite this, their tadpoles are only 3cm long.1Chinstrap penguin (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Chinstrap_PenguinChinstrap penguins are well adapted for the extreme cold of the Antarctic waters. Their short, densely packed feathers act as insulation to keep the heat in, as well as a water proofing layer to keep the water out. There is a very large and healthy population that lives and breeds in large colonies numbering into the millions. The chinstrap penguin's main predators are leopard seals and birds such as skuas that prey on the chicks and eggs.1Chocolate tree (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/ChocolateReady-to-eat chocolate trees have recently been rediscovered having long been hidden away in the greenhouses of Kew Gardens. This unusual member of the cocoa family produces a bean that can be eaten straight from its seed pod and has the potential to revolutionise the world's chocolate market. This particular species has been genetically blended with the sugar plant to create beans with a much sweeter taste. Further work is underway investigating the potential to produce subspecies with different flavours and even in different shapes...1Clark's grebe (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Clark%27s_GrebeClark's grebes were once thought to a lighter coloured variation or morph of the western grebe rather than a separate species. Both species are found in north America, often together, and they perform similar spectacular and elaborate courtship displays involving mate feeding and rushing though there is little interbreeding. They build floating nests of vegetation in freshwater wetlands and marshy areas and use a dagger-like bill for catching fish while diving underwater.1Clark's grebe (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Clark's_GrebeClark's grebes were once thought to a lighter coloured variation or morph of the western grebe rather than a separate species. Both species are found in north America, often together, and they perform similar spectacular and elaborate courtship displays involving mate feeding and rushing though there is little interbreeding. They build floating nests of vegetation in freshwater wetlands and marshy areas and use a dagger-like bill for catching fish while diving underwater.1Blackbird (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Common_BlackbirdBlackbirds are are one of the commonest birds in Britain, with a recent estimate of 4,400,000 pairs, though there may have been about a 33% decline over the last 25 years. Albino blackbirds are not uncommon and most simply have white patches. Completely white individuals seldom survive, as they are more conspicuous to predators.1Common blossom bat (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Common_Blossom_BatCommon blossom bats are a type of fruit bat, but they prefer to eat nectar and pollen over fruit. As they feed, they pollinate the flowers of the rainforest trees. When food is scarce, the bats can go into torpor to save energy. They're most likely to do this in the summer, when there may be a shortage of nectar and because the short summer nights don't allow much feeding time.1Common bluebell (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Common_BluebellCommon bluebells are anything but ordinary, with a spring woodland carpeted in masses of bluebells a sight to behold. This spectacular botannical display is only found in northern Europe, with Britain containing more than half of the worlds population. Common bluebells are a protected species in the UK. The main threats to their survival is people picking the flowers and illegally digging up the bulbs. Hybrid bluebell species, because of crossing with the Spanish bluebell, are also a major problem.1Common bottlenose dolphin (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Common_Bottlenose_DolphinCommon bottlenose dolphins are widespread, active and very acrobatic. They are extremely sociable and sometimes hunt their prey (fish, squid and shrimp) in teams.1Chimpanzee (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Common_ChimpanzeeChimpanzees are probably the most intelligent non-human animal. They're very similar to humans both in appearance and in their social behaviour.1Common crossbill (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Common_CrossbillCommon crossbills have a distinctively shaped beak that gives them their name. Folklore tells that the crossbill got its beak when it attempted to remove the nails from Jesus' hands and feet as he was crucified on the cross. The crossed bill enables crossbills to pull pine seeds out of pine cones.1Common cuckoo (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Common_CuckooCommon cuckoos are solitary birds more often heard than seen. The familiar and unforgettable 'cuck-oo cuck-oo' call heralds the beginning of spring when they return to Europe from wintering in sub-Saharan Africa and south east Asia. As one of the most infamous brood parasites, cuckoos lay their eggs in the nests of other birds with precision timing. Once hatched, the chick ejects the legitimate occupants and then gets fed by its new and unsuspecting foster parents - true masters of deception.1Kestrel (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Common_KestrelKestrels are the most common bird of prey in Europe though their numbers have declined in Britain in the last few years. Their habit of hovering, particularly near motorways, means that they are also one of the easiest to spot.1Kingfisher (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Common_KingfisherKingfishers are one of Britain’s most interesting birds. Their vivid colour is iridescence, not pigment – the pigment is actually dark brown! Interference between different wavelengths of light reflected from different layers of the feathers produces blues, greens and oranges. The feathers on the bird’s back can seem blue or green depending on the angle at which they are viewed.1Pheasant (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Common_PheasantPheasants are not native to Britain, but they've now been here for centuries and have become the most common of our game birds.1Raven (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Common_RavenRavens are the largest perching bird in Europe, that now only occupy the rural parts of their former range here. They prefer the upland moorlands and coastal cliffs of Europe, northern Africa, Asia and North America. Although they have a wide and varied diet, it's carrion on which they most rely. These giants of the crow family are know to be super intelligent, but they are also playful, performing mid-air acrobatics and playing games that involve passing stones to one another. Pairs mate for life.1Common toad (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Common_ToadCommon toads secrete an irritant from their skin that prevents most predators from wanting to eat them. Unfortunately for the toads however, a few predators, such as grass snakes and hedgehogs, don't seem to be deterred. If they avoid getting gobbled by a snake or hedgehog, toads can live for up to 40 years.1Common wasp (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Common_waspCommon wasps are instantly recognisable because of their yellow and black stripes. They are social insects and live in underground nests of up to 10,000 workers. The wasps do not construct their own burrow but will choose one which already exists, such as an abandoned animal burrow, a corner of a garden shed, or the loft of a house.1Puma (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/CougarPumas are the most widespread of the American cats and have the largest distribution of any mammal in the western hemisphere. They also hold the record as the mammal with the most common names, with over 40 in English alone.1Crabeater seal (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Crabeater_SealCrabeater seals gather around the coast and pack ice of Antarctica. Their population is estimated at an enormous 15 to 40 million. They spend most of the night diving for food, travelling or just exploring. These seals are very mobile and fast on land, and can range over hundreds of kilometres at a top speed of around 25kmph. Curiously, given their name, the crabeater seal's primary food source isn't crabs, but the shrimp-like krill which they sieve out of the water.1Crest-tailed mulgara (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Crest-tailed_MulgaraMulgaras are small, carnivorous marsupials that eat insects, spiders and scorpions, small lizards and even other small mammals. Amazingly, mulgaras don't need to drink. They get all the water they need from their food. They can store fat in their tail as a buffer against food shortage, a good strategy in the unpredictable desert.1Crowned eagle (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Crowned_EagleCrowned eagles have wingspans of 180cm making them one of the largest eagles in Africa. As with most birds of prey, females are larger than males. Their favourite prey is primates, and mated pairs will sometimes hunt co-operatively.1Dall sheep (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Dall_SheepDall Sheep are found in the northwest of North America. For the most part they are alpine animals that relying on the steep cliffs and rugged outcrops of mountainous areas to escape predators. Males have large curling horns and the female's horns are more slender.1Damaraland mole rat (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Damaraland_Mole_RatDamaraland mole-rats and naked mole-rats are the only known eusocial mammals. This means they behave like bees or ants by living in a colony with a single breeding female (the queen) and related, reproductively suppressed, workers and soldiers.1Dartford warbler (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Dartford_WarblerDartford Warblers are tiny, secretive birds, often glimpsed darting between bushes on lowland heath. If surprised they emit a harsh rattling call before vanishing into cover. They are unusual amongst the British warblers as they don't migrate away for the winter. As a result, they run the risk of starving if there's a period of severe frost when insects and spiders can't be found. During the harsh winter of 1962 numbers in the UK fell from 450 pairs to just 10.1Darwin's frog (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Darwin%27s_FrogDarwin's frogs are also known as Darwin's toads. The males play an important part in rearing the young, and have an unusual (and slightly alarming when first witnessed) brooding technique. They swallow their own tadpoles and then carry them around in their vocal sacs until they turn into froglets.1Darwin's frog (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Darwin's_FrogDarwin's frogs are also known as Darwin's toads. The males play an important part in rearing the young, and have an unusual (and slightly alarming when first witnessed) brooding technique. They swallow their own tadpoles and then carry them around in their vocal sacs until they turn into froglets.1Daubenton's bat (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Daubenton's_BatDaubenton's bats are super sleepers, hibernating for six months of the year. Favouring dark underground places such as caves and abandoned mines during hibernation, Daubenton's bats roost close to water in hollow trees, tunnels and even lofts for the rest of the year. They leave their roosts at twilight to hunt for small insects which they scoop up with their membranous tails and large feet, skimming just centimetres above the water's surface. Like all British bats, Daubenton's use echolocation to locate prey and orientate themselves. They are found throughout Britain and Europe, and as far east as Japan and Korea.1Demoiselle crane (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Demoiselle_CraneDemoiselle cranes gather into large flocks while on migration, but once they reach their breeding grounds they gradually become territorial, with each pair nesting on their own.1Desert locust (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Desert_LocustThe desert locust is one of about a dozen species of grasshoppers known as locusts which - unlike other grasshoppers - are able to change their behaviour in response to population density. This enables them to form swarms that can migrate over large distances. Locust swarms vary from less than one square kilometre to several hundred square kilometres. There can be from 40 million to as many as 80 million locust adults in each square kilometre of a swarm.1Doria's Tree-Kangaroo (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Doria%27s_Tree-kangarooDoria's tree kangaroos are the heaviest tree-dwelling marsupials in the world. They can perform some impressive leaps of around 10 metres between trees and 18 metres to the ground. Although Doria's tree kangaroos spend most of the day up in the trees, once on the ground they can leap and jump just like their Australian relatives.1Doria's Tree-Kangaroo (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Doria's_Tree-kangarooDoria's tree kangaroos are the heaviest tree-dwelling marsupials in the world. They can perform some impressive leaps of around 10 metres between trees and 18 metres to the ground. Although Doria's tree kangaroos spend most of the day up in the trees, once on the ground they can leap and jump just like their Australian relatives.1Dragon's blood tree (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Dracaena_cinnabariDragon's blood trees are a distinctive and slow-growing species of dragon tree native to the Socotra archipelago off the horn of Africa. The famous red resin that gives it it's name is exuded from the bark after wounding. The medicinal and colouring properties of this resin, and that from other dragon trees, was recorded by the ancient civilisations of Greece and Rome. It continues to be used in medicine, dyes, varnish and incense to this day.1Dugong (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/DugongDugongs are believed to have been the basis of mermaid legends when glimpsed swimming in the water from a distance. They could hardly be described as beautiful but they do have a certain grace underwater. The world's largest population of dugongs - over 10,000 animals - feed year-round in Shark Bay, the southern limit of their range.1Eastern Gorilla (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Eastern_GorillaGorillas are the world's largest primate and for years they've been portrayed as fearsome and aggressive beasts. But gorillas are actually gentle giants that have strong family ties and live on a vegetarian diet. The eastern gorilla has three subspecies: the mountain gorilla, the Bwindi gorilla and the eastern lowland gorilla.1Grey squirrel (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Eastern_gray_squirrelGrey squirrels are notorious for displacing red squirrels in European woodlands. They out-compete the native reds for food, feeding more at ground level and being able to digest acorns, which the reds can't. They also carry a deadly pox virus which does not affect them. Grey squirrels were introduced to the UK from the USA in the late 19th or early 20th century. They're now widespread throughout England south of Cumbria and Wales, and common in local pockets in Scotland. They are absent from the rest of mainland Europe, except for small localised populations in Italy.1Eastern grey kangaroo (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Eastern_Grey_KangarooEastern grey kangaroos can leap up to 9m in a single bound, but this great ability often gets them into trouble with Australian sheep farmers. Many are shot by farmers as they leap over fences and feed on grazing land, but luckily the kangaroo population is large enough to withstand this depletion in numbers.1Army ant (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Eciton_burchelliiArmy ants live in Central and South America. They have a completely carnivorous diet. This is because they need a high fat content in their food so their larvae can complete their growth and development.1Eleonora's falcon (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Eleonora%27s_FalconEleonora's falcons are unusual because they change their diet when the breeding season arrives. Normally, they eat flying insects, such as dragonflies and locusts. When small migrating birds pass through the area, however, the falcons switch to hunting these and use this sudden abundance of food to feed their chicks.1Eleonora's falcon (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Eleonora's_FalconEleonora's falcons are unusual because they change their diet when the breeding season arrives. Normally, they eat flying insects, such as dragonflies and locusts. When small migrating birds pass through the area, however, the falcons switch to hunting these and use this sudden abundance of food to feed their chicks.1Elk (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/ElkElk are one of the world's largest species of deer once thought to be the same species as the red deer. They are now known to be a species in their own right and are in fact more closely related to sika deer than to red deer. Primarily grazers and browsers of open woodland and forests, elk are native to North America and east Asia. They have also become well established in all other countries where they've been introduced. The males grow large, impressive antlers every year that are used in the spectacular clashes that take place during the seasonal rut. Calves can be particularly vulnerable to wolves, coyotes, bears and big cats.1Emperor penguin (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Emperor_PenguinEmperor penguins are the largest of the penguin family, and endure the worst breeding conditions of any bird. Emperor penguins never attempt to settle on land, they choose ice naturally formed in the sea.1Ethiopian wolf (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Ethiopian_WolfEthiopian wolves number fewer than 500 in the wild, and there are no records of them ever having bred in captivity.1Yellow anaconda (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Eunectes_notaeusYellow anacondas give birth to live young after a six-month pregnancy. The young have to fend for themselves from the moment that they are born.1Himalayan jumping spider (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Euophrys_omnisuperstesThe Himalayan jumping spider is a tiny spider that lives high up in the Himalayas, and has been found at altitudes as high as 6700 metres above sea level. Its only source of food at these extreme heights is stray insects that are blown up the mountainside by the wind.1Eurasian eagle owl (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Eurasian_Eagle-owlEurasian eagle owls are one of the biggest species of owl in the world. They are easily identified by their large stature, prominent ear tufts and bright orange eyes.1Oystercatcher (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Eurasian_OystercatcherOystercatchers are striking, black and white wading birds with long bright red bills. Their bill is used to break into shellfish, and each individual inherits a particular technique from its parents. Despite the name, oystercatchers are not known to eat oysters and in fact favour mussels. They supplement this specialised diet of hard-shelled molluscs with softer-bodied invertebrates, such as crustaceans, worms and insects. Oystercatcherd are primarily shorebirds, although they do sometimes breed inland by rivers and lochs. They are more usually found at the coast during the winter.1Sparrowhawk (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Eurasian_SparrowhawkSparrowhawks are so-named because 98% of their diet consists of other birds. Although sparrowhawk numbers declined very badly as a result of pesticide use, the British population has now recovered almost everywhere and there may be as many sparrowhawks breeding as kestrels.1Stone curlew (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Eurasian_Stone-curlewStone curlews have a strangely haunting look. Their wide open yellow eyes and crouched stance add to the effect of their wailing cry. Keeping a low profile is what the stone curlew does best. When confronted with danger these birds either scurry away to cover, or freeze on the spot hoping to blend into the background. Their courtship display is also a rather understated affair. Though rarely seen in Britain, stone curlews do migrate to parts of Wiltshire and Norfolk for the summer, spending the winter in the warmer climes of southern France, Spain or Africa.1Badger (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/European_BadgerBadgers are nocturnal and elusive, but remain one of the UK's favourite mammals. Like humans, they are omnivorous, although unlike us, they eat several hundred earthworms every night.1Common beech (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/European_BeechCommon beeches are beautiful woodland and landscape trees at any time of year. Pairs of nuts (masts) are produced in autumn from the female flowers, making a welcome source of food for deer, squirrels and mice. Livestock were once released into beech woodlands to feast on the beech's oil-rich bounty. This large, graceful giant can reach 40 metres or more, has alternate silky green oval leaves and a smooth grey bark. Beech trees are common throughout the chalky soils of Europe and were once thought to have been introduced into Britain by the Romans. However, pollen dating suggests they have been here since the last ice age.1Brook lamprey (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/European_brook_lampreyBrook lampreys look superficially like eels, but are in fact jawless fish. They belong to a primitive group of fish that have sucker-like mouths instead of teeth and jaws. The larvae have no eyes or sucker-mouth when they hatch out, and spend the first part of their lives hiding away in the mud of the river bed. They live in rivers and streams. eating algae, diatoms and organic debris by filter feeding. As they mature they stop feeding and develop the sucker typical of a lamprey. Once the adults have spawned, they die.1Hare (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/European_HareHares are much longer-limbed and swifter than rabbits. The brown hare can run at 50kmph (30mph) and may possibly even reach a top speed of 72kmph (45mph).1Hedgehog (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/European_HedgehogHedgehogs are named after their pig-like habit of rooting through the undergrowth for food. They are quite noisy and can often be heard snuffling and grunting during their activities. The hedgehog courting ritual can be a very noisy affair, with the animals circling each other for hours.1European honey bee (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/European_honey_beeEuropean honey bees have been introduced to nearly all parts of the world by humans, but they are thought to have originated in India. Their colonies are long-lasting and may last for many years. The bees live on stored reserves of food and huddle together in a large mass during cold winter weather. The drones are turned outside in autumn to die once their reproductive role is over.1Nightjar (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/European_NightjarNightjars are most active at dawn and dusk when they hunt for moths, beetles and crane flies. They demonstrate astonishing aerial agility as they execute rapid twists and turns in pursuit of their prey. Nightjars are summer visitors to the UK, which is right at the western tip of their breeding range that extends from Africa to Mongolia. During courtship, the male attracts a mate by calling with a loud ‘churring’ call that contains 1,900 notes per minute. Nightjars have an unusual serrated middle claw which they use like an inbuilt comb to preen their feathers.1Otter (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/European_OtterOtters are inquisitive, playful and intelligent, often appearing to take childlike enjoyment in sliding around on muddy banks or in snow. They are semi-aquatic mammals and live in holts around water edges. They are fast, agile swimmers. Bubbles of air trapped in their fur give them a silvery appearance underwater.1Pine marten (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/European_Pine_MartenPine martens are elusive members of the weasel family, and sport a creamy yellow throat bib. Found throughout most of central and northern Europe, this once heavily persecuted marten is now extinct from most of England and Wales. Their last remaining UK stronghold is in Scotland. They favour well wooded areas where they can nest in hollow trees and old animal homes. Pine martens eat small mammals and seasonally available produce such as autumn fruits and berries. They are also treetop hunters that can race skillfully along branches, leaping from tree to tree in pursuit of squirrels.1Polecat (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/European_PolecatPolecats are solitary and predominantly nocturnal weasel-like animals, where the males are quite obviously larger and heavier than the females. They produce a strong musky scent from anal glands when threatened, and this is also used to mark their territories. These streamlined predators can lock their jaws together so tightly it can be near impossible to prise them apart. Ferrets are the domesticated descendants of the polecat.1Rabbit (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/European_RabbitRabbits came originally from south west Europe and north west Africa. Deliberate introduction to many countries has been so successful that rabbits are often considered as pests, owing to the vast ecological and agricultural damage they can cause. Yet they remain a economically important mammal species for food, fur and so on. The grass and plants they graze at dawn and dusk are of such poor nutritional value that rabbits eat their faeces to squeeze every last bit of remaining nourishment. Thumping their back legs sends a warning to others that one of their numerous predators is about.1Robin (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/European_RobinRobins are the UK's national bird, made so after being voted most popular bird by public ballot in the 1960s. They are notoriously aggressive towards each other. Both males and females are territorial and will even attack a bundle of red feathers or their own reflection, mistaking it for another individual.1Starling (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/European_StarlingStarlings have always been thought of as a common bird in the UK, but their numbers in the UK have declined - possibly due to the use of pesticides and consequent lack of invertebrate prey.1Storm petrel (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/European_Storm-petrelStorm petrels avoid being attacked by skuas and gulls, by only returning to their nests in the dead of night.1European water vole (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/European_Water_VoleWater voles are widespread around Europe, living in the banks of slow moving rivers, streams and other waterways. The waterside burrows of these strong swimmers have many floor levels that hinder flooding, as well as nesting chambers and a food store for the long winter months. Although water voles are a quick meal for many predators, the UK population suffered a catastrophic level of predation by the American mink. Water voles are often mistaken for rats. Ratty, in Kenneth Grahame's 'The Wind in the Willows', was actually a water vole.1Fallow deer (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Fallow_DeerFallow deer are a widespread species of deer in Britain. Originally from the Mediterranean and middle east, these deer were spread across Europe by the Romans and introduced to British parks and forests by the Normans in the 11th century. They spend most of the year in single sex herds, only coming together in autumn for the annual rut, where the males groan, parallel walk and lock antlers. Luckily, injuries are rare although the males sport impressive multi-point antlers. Fallow deer are smaller than red deer and have a spotted coat, but in some individuals the spots are not very prominent and may disappear in winter.1Field vole (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Field_voleField voles range across Europe and east into Asia. They are present on the UK mainland, but absent in Ireland and some islands. As they travel, field voles leave a trail of scent to warn off other voles. Hunting birds of prey, such as kestrels, look out for the UV light that radiates from the trails.1Scottish wood ant (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Formica_aquiloniaIn Britain, the Scottish wood ant is found in the Highlands, Skye and Arran, but also in Armagh in Northern Ireland. It is also found in Europe. They are carnivorous, and prey on many insects that eat pine needles, thus the ants help to keep their pine wood habitat healthy.1François' langur (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Francois%27_LangurFrançois' langurs are one of the world's rarest monkeys. Handsome and athletic, they're found in northeast Vietnam and in two Chinese provinces: Guangxi and Guizhou. The Guangxi Province population has decreased by 85% in recent years, as a result of hunting and habitat loss. Troop females share parenting duties with each other, but the sole male plays no part in raising his offspring.1François' langur (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Francois'_LangurFrançois' langurs are one of the world's rarest monkeys. Handsome and athletic, they're found in northeast Vietnam and in two Chinese provinces: Guangxi and Guizhou. The Guangxi Province population has decreased by 85% in recent years, as a result of hunting and habitat loss. Troop females share parenting duties with each other, but the sole male plays no part in raising his offspring.1Frilled lizard (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Frill-necked_LizardFrilled lizards are one of Australia's oddest-looking lizard species. Their huge frill, which can be 30cm across, seems to be mostly for display. Both sexes have frills, but males use them when threatened or when they encounter other males in their territory, especially during the breeding season. In spite of their ferocious appearance, frilled lizards feed largely on insects.1Snake's head fritillary (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Fritillaria_meleagrisSnake's head fritillaries are most unusual looking wildflowers and the UK's only native fritillary species. Various shades of purple flower begin to appear in spring, and close inspection reveals a checked pattern like silvery scales. This can even be seen on the luminous white form. They are found in the damp, lowland meadows and pastures of Europe, including south-east England. They thrive on land that has never been subjected to intensive agriculture, and are now quite rare. They were once known as leper lilies and lazarus bells as the bell-shaped flowers resembled the bells worn by lepers in the Middle Ages to announce their presence.1Galápagos fur seal (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Gal%C3%A1pagos_Fur_SealThese are the smallest of all fur seals, but have the longest nursing period of all, as pups remain with their mother from 2 to 3 years.1Galápagos land iguana (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Gal%C3%A1pagos_Land_IguanaGalápagos land iguanas get relief from ticks by allowing Galápagos finches pick them off their skin.1Galápagos petrel (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Gal%C3%A1pagos_PetrelGalápagos petrels are only found in the Galápagos Islands and surrounding seas. They are endangered as a result of predation from introduced species such as rats, dogs and cats which eat both the petrels and their eggs.1Galápagos giant tortoise (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Gal%C3%A1pagos_tortoiseGalápagos giant tortoises were studied by Charles Darwin when he made his famous visit to the Galápagos in 1835. He discovered that the shape of the shells varied from island to island and population to population, as each subspecies of Galápagos giant tortoise adapted to a particular environment and habitat.1Snowdrop (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Galanthus_nivalisSnowdrops are perennial flowering plants native to large parts of Europe. Found in many woodlands, churchyards, parks and gardens, snowdrops are some of the first bulbs of the year to bloom. This early flowering, which carpets the ground between January and April, is aided by hardened leaf tips that can push through frozen soil. The downside to flowering in winter is that pollinating insects are scarce, so these little drops of snow spread mainly through bulb division.1Galápagos fur seal (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Galápagos_Fur_SealThese are the smallest of all fur seals, but have the longest nursing period of all, as pups remain with their mother from 2 to 3 years.1Galápagos land iguana (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Galapagos_Land_IguanaGalápagos land iguanas get relief from ticks by allowing Galápagos finches pick them off their skin.1Galápagos petrel (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Galápagos_PetrelGalápagos petrels are only found in the Galápagos Islands and surrounding seas. They are endangered as a result of predation from introduced species such as rats, dogs and cats which eat both the petrels and their eggs.1Galápagos giant tortoise (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Galápagos_tortoiseGalápagos giant tortoises were studied by Charles Darwin when he made his famous visit to the Galápagos in 1835. He discovered that the shape of the shells varied from island to island and population to population, as each subspecies of Galápagos giant tortoise adapted to a particular environment and habitat.1<url>http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Gecko</url><description>No description available</description><color>1</color><sources/></node><node><title>Gelada baboon (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/GeladaGeladas are not actually true baboons, although they look very similar. They live in big groups, which sometimes have as many as 600 members.1Giant anteater (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Giant_AnteaterGiant anteaters have tongues measuring up to 50cm, no teeth, and feed on termites as well as ants. Their long hair and thick skin protects them from the bites of angry ants and termites defending their nest.1Giant river otter (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Giant_OtterGiant river otters are known in South America as 'los lobos del rio' - the wolves of the river. They hunt in packs just like their namesakes, flushing out fish in the backwaters of the Amazon.1Giant panda (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Giant_PandaGiant pandas are rare and elusive, yet are one of the most popular of all animals. Famous for their love of bamboo, little else is known about their behaviour in the wild, and their breeding success in captivity is poor.1Giant tube worm (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Giant_tube_wormGiant tube worms grow to over 2 metres long and inhabit the hot waters around hydrothermal vents on the Pacific Ocean bed. Like their cool water relatives, giant tube worms do not have a digestive tract. Their food is manufactured by bacteria that live symbiotically inside each worm's body. In return for their energy producing services, the bacteria are provided with a safe place to live and supplied with oxygen, carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulphide gathered by the worm's 'tentacles'.1Giraffe (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/GiraffeGiraffes first experience life as a two metre drop to the ground, because female giraffes give birth standing up. For the first few weeks, the calf remains hidden in the shade and the mother returns to it from her foraging trips. Later on, the calf is taken to join a creche. Calves grow fast and are weaned at 18 months, although they start eating solids well before then.1Golden eagle (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Golden_EagleGolden eagles are one of the most magnificent birds of prey in the UK. Like many birds of prey, the females are much larger than the males. There are about 440 pairs in Scotland and generally just one pair in the Lake District.1Golden snub-nosed monkey (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Golden_Snub-nosed_MonkeyGolden snub-nosed monkeys live in family groups of one male and numerous females. The family groups band together with others, forming troops of 20 to 30 individuals in the winter and up to 200 individuals in the summer.1Gopher tortoise (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Gopherus_polyphemusGopher tortoises rely on forest fires to clear their habitat of scrub and make room for edible plants to grow. Long and deep burrows shelter these tortoises not only from the fires but from predators. Other species rely on these burrows for their survival too.1Grass snake (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Grass_SnakeGrass snakes are the UK's largest reptile, and can reach up to 1.9m in length. They are one of the few animals that play dead as a defence against predators.1Grey seal (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Gray_SealGrey seals are the largest breeding seal found in the UK. Half of the world's population of grey seals are found on and around British coasts, and numbers here have doubled since 1960.1Grey whale (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Gray_WhaleGrey whales are split into two separate populations, the eastern North Pacific (American) and the critically endangered western North Pacific (Asian) population. Belonging to the baleen whale group, they have plates for filtering marine worms and crustaceans from the ocean floor. Grey whales undertake the longest annual migration of any known mammal, along the coastlines between their summer feeding and winter breeding grounds. They are the only species in their genus, which in turn, is the only genus in the family.1Grey wolf (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Gray_WolfGrey wolves once had the largest natural distribution of any mammal except human beings. Sadly, they can no longer claim this record as they have been lost from much of their former range. The dingo and the dog are both subspecies of the grey wolf.1Greater bulldog bat (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Greater_Bulldog_BatGreater bulldog bats are one of only a handfull of bat species that primarily eat fish (piscivores). Found near water in parts of south and central America these fishing bats use echolocation to detect ripples in the water, caused by the fins of small fishes, from two metres away. They then rake their large, taloned feet through the water impaling the unsuspecting prey. This method can result in a catch of over 30 fish during a single fishing trip.1Greater flamingo (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Greater_FlamingoGreater flamingos spend much of their day wading about with their heads upside down, filtering food from the waters of lakes and lagoons. They can be distinguished from lesser flamingos by their larger size, paler plumage and pink bills.1Great crested grebe (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Great_Crested_GrebeGreat crested grebes are the largest grebes in Europe, with a range spanning from Britain to Russia. Once persecuted for their feathers, their population was devastated during the Victorian period. Following excellent conservation measures, numbers have since greatly increased. These grebes are well known for their elaborate courtship displays where pairs raise and shake their heads and approach each other with weed in their bills. After hatching, the stripy chicks are carried around on the backs of their parents.1Great crested newt (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Great_Crested_NewtGreat crested newts are Britain’s largest newt species. Although now afforded some legal protection in the UK, populations have declined over recent years as a result of the destruction and fragmentation of their habitat1Great diving beetle (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Great_diving_beetleGreat diving beetles are one of the UK's largest beetles and they are fierce predators. As their name suggests they spend most of their lives underwater. However they can also fly and do so when travelling to colonise new freshwater habitats.1Great northern diver (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Great_Northern_LoonGreat northern divers, or common loons as they are known in north America, are one of the largest species of diver. Like the other divers they are specialised and powerful underwater swimmers, catching fish with thick, dagger-like bills by sight. The chicks are able to dive only two days after hatching and will often sit on a parent's back for a ride around their territory. An adult can be host to 40 different body parasites.1Great spotted woodpecker (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Great_Spotted_WoodpeckerGreat spotted woodpeckers are the most widespread and numerous woodpecker in the UK. They have a large range covering almost the entire Palearctic from Britain in the west to Japan in the east and reaching North Africa and the Canary Islands in the south-west. They are not found in Ireland or the far north of Scotland.1Great white shark (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Great_white_sharkGreat white sharks are widely feared as the most dangerous of man-eaters, but they are at far greater risk from us than we from them. They are responsible for about 5-10 attacks a year.1Grey heron (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Grey_HeronGrey herons are large, striking birds often spotted standing motionless at the water's edge. Having found a suitable location, herons stand and wait patiently for the right moment to stab passing prey with their dagger-like beaks. They also wade through shallow water searching for small fish and amphibians. Herons fly with their head drawn back and feet trailing behind. The wing beats are slow and their curved wings form an m-shape.1Guanaco (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/GuanacoGuanaco's can hold much more oxygen in their blood than many other mammals. This makes them capable of living in the thin air of the high Andes, where they can be found at altitudes of up to 4,500m.1Gunnison's prairie dog (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Gunnison%27s_Prairie_DogGunnison's prairie dogs are burrowing ground squirrels found in the valleys and plateaus of the Rocky Mountains. Their sophisticated calls and dog-like barks can distinguish between their many predators. They are also specific to a species, with different populations having local dialects. Compared to other prairie dogs Gunnison's have shorter tails and, although you can't see it, they only have 40 chromosomes - all the others have 50. Their colonies are small for prairie dogs and the least socially structured.1Gunnison's prairie dog (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Gunnison's_Prairie_DogGunnison's prairie dogs are burrowing ground squirrels found in the valleys and plateaus of the Rocky Mountains. Their sophisticated calls and dog-like barks can distinguish between their many predators. They are also specific to a species, with different populations having local dialects. Compared to other prairie dogs Gunnison's have shorter tails and, although you can't see it, they only have 40 chromosomes - all the others have 50. Their colonies are small for prairie dogs and the least socially structured.1Hamadryas baboon (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Hamadryas_BaboonHamadryas baboons roam the semi-deserts of northeast Africa and the Arabian peninsula, but never stray far from watering holes or the cliffs where they sleep. Hamadryas baboon society is intriguing: it is highly organised into groups with a male leader who herds and controls up to 10 females and their young. These one male units come together to form clans, multiple clans form a band, and an aggregation of bands forms a troop - there really is safety in numbers. The ancient Egyptians considered hamadryas baboons to be sacred, however, they are now extinct in Egypt.1Common seal (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Harbor_SealCommon seals, as the name suggests, are very common, especially in the waters of the north Atlantic and north Pacific Oceans. They are the most widespread of the pinniped family, with the UK boasting five percent of the worlds population. Mostly solitary animals, small groups do form when they haul-out onto rocky shores and beaches to bask, mate and moult. At sea common seals have much to fear from killer whales and great white sharks. Common seals don't chew their food, it is just torn into chunks or even swallowed whole.1Harlequin ladybird (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Harmonia_axyridisHarlequin ladybirds were introduced to north America and mainland Europe as a biological control for aphids. However, with their populations spreading rapidly the tables have turned on these ladybirds. Their voracious apetites and the subsequent decline of native ladybird species has focused attention on them as a subject for control. Large numbers hibernate indoors and in wall cavities during cool winter weather, which doesn't help their cause.1Dormouse (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Hazel_DormouseCommon dormice may spend up to three quarters of their life asleep. They hibernate when food is scarce to conserve energy. In Britain, they are mainly found in the southern counties, although they are present in a few scattered locations in the Lake District and mid-Wales.1Herring gull (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Herring_GullHerring gulls are champion opportunists, and will forage on landfill sites, scavenge the remains of takeaways in city centres and follow the plough to snap up worms - not bad for a supposedly seaside bird!1High brown fritillary (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/High_Brown_FritillaryThe high brown fritillary butterfly used to be common across Wales and England, but is now found in only a few places. Its caterpillars feed on violets.1Hippopotamus (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/HippopotamusHippopotamuses are large African mammals that spend most of their life in water - including when giving birth, suckling young and mating. Their thin skin makes them very prone to dehydration when on land.1Honey buzzard (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Honey_BuzzardHoney buzzards, unlike most UK birds of prey, have adapted to a diet of insects and their larvae. They rob bee and wasp nests for the insects and their grubs inside, although a small proportion of their diet includes little mammals and reptiles.1Human (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/HumanHumans are in the same great ape family as the chimpanzees, gorillas and orangutans - with which they share a common ancestor. Since leaving their African homeland some 70,000 years ago, modern humans have come to dominate every continent on Earth except Antarctica. As a behaviourally, socially and culturally diverse species, humans have developed art and complex languages. As a species humans cannot survive without tools. They are the only known species to build fires, cook food and clothe themselves.1Humboldt penguin (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Humboldt_PenguinHumboldt penguins are thought to be declining in number. One of the reasons is due to El Nino increasing water temperatures and reducing food supply. They breed on the Pacific coast of South America and offshore islands of Chile and Peru.1Humboldt squid (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Humboldt_SquidHumboldt squid are found in the warm waters of the Eastern Pacific Ocean, and cover a range that expands as the waters are warmed by El Niño. These large squid migrate vertically (diel migration) to follow their prey, from depths of over 1,000m during the day to the surface waters at night. They capture their prey with their tentacles and suckers and rip it apart with their powerful beak. Like other cephalopods, Humboldt squid can change colour, flashing bright red when angered or excited - giving rise to their name 'the red devil'.1Humpback whale (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Humpback_WhaleHumpback whales are renowned for their extraordinary and complex songs, performed by males during courtship. These songs can last for hours and are specific to different populations.1Indri (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/IndriIndris are endangered, tree-dwelling lemurs native to Madagascar. They're known locally as babakotos, which means 'man of the forest' or 'little father' and unlike other lemurs, only have a short stumpy tail. The largest of the living lemurs can climb trees with ease, using their powerful legs to jump through the canopy in leaps of over 10 metres. Indris produce loud territorial calls that can be heard from over 1km away.1Jaguar (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/JaguarJaguars are formidable beasts and the largest cats of the Americas. The Yanomami Indians call jaguars the 'Eaters of Souls', owing to their belief that it consumes the spirits of the dead.1Japanese giant salamander (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Japanese_giant_salamanderJapanese giant salamanders can grow up to 1.5m long, and are the second largest salamanders in the world. They can survive for weeks without eating, owing to their very slow metabolism.1Japanese macaque (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Japanese_MacaqueJapanese macaques are the most northerly-living non-human primates. In the forested and mountainous, region of Japan where they're found, some populations have been known to bathe in hot springs during the freezing winters and swim during the sweltering summer heat. Japanese macaques have become famous for washing their food in saltwater before they eat it, both cleaning it and enhancing the taste. This skill has spread through the population and down the generations. For fun these macaques make snowballs, just like us.1Kakapo (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/KakapoKakapos are very unusual parrots. They're flightless, very large - sometimes reaching 4kg in weight - and their courtship system is one known as 'lekking', where the males gather together to display to the females. Kakapos are native to New Zealand, but now only exists on specially protected islands, where their nests are safe from introduced vermin such as rats, stoats and feral cats.1Kea (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/KeaKeas are incredibly versatile parrots with considerable intelligence, often compared favourably with primates - which is how they received their nickname of 'mountain monkeys'.1Killer whale (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Killer_WhaleKiller whales, or orcas, are actually the largest members of the dolphin family and one of the fastest animals in the sea. The record holder is a male timed at 55.5km/h (34.5mph). One of the most widespread mammals on Earth, they can be found in all of the world's oceans.1King bird of paradise (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/King_Bird_of_ParadiseMale king birds of paradise hang upside down from branches as part of their courtship display. After courting and mating with one female a male moves on to the next. Unsuccessful males, those that don't impress the females with their displays, may never mate at all. Some females appear to be less fussy, as hybrids between the king bird of paradise and the magnificent bird of paradise have been known.1King penguin (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/King_PenguinKing penguins are extraordinary parents. While one parent guarding the chick, the other makes a trip of up to 400km (250 miles) in search of food. When the young are old enough, they are left with other juveniles so both parents can search for food. The adults return to the sea during the winter, leaving the chicks alone, and they are rarely fed during this time.1Kipunji (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/KipunjiKipunjis were first discovered in 2003 and reported to the world in 2005. They were the first monkey species to be assigned a new genus since the 1920s. The only two known populations are in the mountain forests of Tanzania and with fewer than 2,000 individuals counted, they are already critically endangered. Little is known about the kipunji yet. They live in groups, mainly up in the tree tops and are, unsurprisingly, shy of humans. Their distinctive and loud 'honk bark' is unlike that of any other monkey and was a factor that helped to distinguish them as a new species.1Koala (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/KoalaKoalas are Australia's national emblem. Compared to other mammals they have a very small brain, which might be due to their low-energy diet of leaves. As a result of this diet, koalas spend 20 hours a day sleeping to conserve energy.1Komodo dragon (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Komodo_dragonKomodo dragons are huge, heavily-built monitor lizards - the largest lizards in the world. The largest accurately recorded specimen was 3.1m long and weighed 166kg. Komodos use deadly saliva containing toxic bacteria as part of their armoury. The bacteria multiply rapidly in a bite wound and lead to blood poisoning and gangrene in the victim. This energy efficient predation keeps the Komodo dragons at the top of the predator tree in their island home.1Common glow-worm (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Lampyris_noctilucaCommon glow-worms are actually bioluminescent beetles. It is the females which glow most noticeably - the larvae and adult males produce only a faint glow. The larvae are predatory and hunt slugs and snails, but as adults they rarely feed. Females have only a few weeks in which to attract a mate and lay eggs. After this, they die. As well as attracting a mate, the glowing abdomen is a warning to predators to stay away - glow-worms taste bad and contain chemicals that cause vomiting.1Large blue butterfly (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Large_Blue_%28butterfly%29The large blue butterfly became extinct in the UK in 1979. A campaign to recreate suitable habitat for the large blue and then reintroduce it began in the 1980s, and there are now several populations in this country.1Large blue butterfly (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Large_Blue_(butterfly)The large blue butterfly became extinct in the UK in 1979. A campaign to recreate suitable habitat for the large blue and then reintroduce it began in the 1980s, and there are now several populations in this country.1Lar gibbon (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Lar_GibbonLar gibbons can be found in forests across China and southeast Asia. They usually live in family groups, with one reproducing male and female and their offspring. Fruit makes up 50% of their diet, but they also feed on leaves, insects, flowers, stems and buds. Like other gibbons, their loud territorial calls can be heard echoing through the forest in the early morning.1Banded sea krait (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Laticauda_colubrinaBanded sea kraits are venomous, but generally not thought to be aggressive and therefore dangerous to divers. Although they feed in the sea, they return to land to mate.1Six-wired bird of paradise (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Lawes%27s_ParotiaSix-wired birds of paradise live in the forests of Papua New Guinea. Like all birds of paradise, the males display to the females, but in addition the six-wired males collect items that the females may be interested in and place them around their dancing courts. These include shed snake skins, which the females use to line their nest, and chalk, which is a useful mineral supplement to the females' diet.1Six-wired bird of paradise (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Lawes's_ParotiaSix-wired birds of paradise live in the forests of Papua New Guinea. Like all birds of paradise, the males display to the females, but in addition the six-wired males collect items that the females may be interested in and place them around their dancing courts. These include shed snake skins, which the females use to line their nest, and chalk, which is a useful mineral supplement to the females' diet.1Leafy sea dragon (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Leafy_sea_dragonLeafy sea dragons are related to seahorses and, like their relations, the male seadragons carry their eggs in a pouch for a month before they hatch.1Leopard (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/LeopardLeopards are one of the prize sightings on a safari. Stealthy and elusive, they are also surprisingly well camouflaged. The twitch of a tail may be the only give-away to a leopard resting in the branches of a tree. There are recognised subspecies living in Africa, Asia and the Middle East, and may be others as yet unidentified.1Leopard seal (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Leopard_SealLeopard seals are named after their spotty coats and for being fearsome hunters. As one of the top predators in Anatarctic waters, they fill the niche that polar bears hold in the Arctic. Leopard seals attack and eat other seals, penguins and fish, however about half their diet is made up of small shrimp-like crustaceans called krill.1Lesser black-backed gull (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Lesser_Black-backed_GullLesser black-backed gulls are easily mistaken for their 'greater' counterparts. They often share nesting colonies with herring gulls, competing with them for food and nest sites.1Lesser flamingo (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Lesser_FlamingoLesser flamingos are the smallest and most common of the flamingos. They live for the most part in East Africa, but can be found as far afield as Spain and Afghanistan.1Lion (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/LionLions are unique in that they are the only cats to live in groups (prides). Male lions are also the only cats that have manes, giving them a regal appearance that has earned them the title 'king of the beasts'.1Little bent-wing bat (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Little_Bent-wing_BatLittle bent-winged bats have tails as long again as their head and body. They usually roost in large colonies in caves, tunnels and even hollow trees. During late winter, little bent-winged bats enter a state of torpor where their body temperature and metabolism is lowered during the cold nights.1Little corella (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Little_CorellaLittle corellas form flocks of thousands of birds and can be a serious pest to Australian farmers, if they decide to feed on their grain crops.1Little owl (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Little_OwlLittle owls were introduced into Britain and, more recently, New Zealand. They hunt mostly at dawn and dusk, swooping down from a perch on to small mammals and insects. Surprisingly - given their carnivorous tendencies - they occasionally eat plant material and berries. Pairs construct nests within hollow cavities, where they lay a clutch of up to six eggs. Often little owls return to the same nest location, and in Britain one owl was recorded using the same site for over 25 years.1Snowdon lily (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Lloydia_serotinaSnowdon lilies are delicate, arctic-alpine flowering plants. Also known as common alplilies, they grow in the mountain ranges of North America and Europe and are common enough on the rolling alpine tundra. In the United Kingdom, however, Snowdon lilies can only be found in one place - Snowdonia National Park - where they grow on a few inaccessible ledges and rock faces, out of reach from grazing animals. The lily's survival in Snowdon is thought to be at risk from climate change.1Long-eared hedgehog (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Long-eared_HedgehogLong-eared hedgehogs are much faster than their longer spined West European cousins. They are also much more feisty. Their long ears give them an acute sense of hearing which helps them to detect both predators and prey.1Long-eared owl (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Long-eared_OwlLong eared owls are long-eared only in name. Their upright appendages are merely decorative tufts. They have an expansive range throughout Europe, over much of North America and across Asia. Typically they inhabit dense vegetation and open forest, and are ferocious predators, swooping down on their prey and dispatching it by crushing the skull before swallowing the animal whole. They are mostly a solitary species, but in winter are known to roost communally in groups called ‘owl parliaments’ of up to 200.1Macaroni penguin (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Macaroni_PenguinMacaroni penguins form large, tightly packed colonies on flat or rough sloping ground. If an intruder gets too close to their patch they can be agressive and the two penguins will peck at each other. The victor of the fight will push its opponent away through the surrounding pairs of nesting penguins.1Hummingbird hawk-moth (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Macroglossum_stellatarumHummingbird hawk-moths beat their wings beat at such speed they emit an audible hum. Their name is further derived from their similar feeding patterns to hummingbirds. They're found in Britain all summer long, especially in southern parts and in Ireland. Active in both sunny and overcast conditions, hummingbird hawk-moths are strongly attracted to flowers with a plentiful supply of nectar such as honeysuckle and buddleia. Studies reveal a remarkable memory, since they return to the same flowerbeds at the same time everyday.1Magellanic penguin (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Magellanic_PenguinMagellanic penguins live in temperate climates, not in the Antarctic. In the breeding season the parents share the babysitting duties, one incubating the chick while the other goes out to sea to feed. The chick gets a meal every two to three days.1Magellanic woodpecker (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Magellanic_WoodpeckerMagellanic woodpeckers are ivory-billed woodpeckers that are found in Argentina and Chile. Whilst the chicks are being brought up, the females tend to catch small prey such as spiders and insects, whilst the males catch larger beetle larvae, lizards and even the chicks of other birds. This behaviour allows both parents to forage in the same area without competing.1Magnificent bird of paradise (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Magnificent_Bird_of_ParadiseMagnificent birds of paradise are surprisingly common in the forested mountains and villages of New Guinea and its surrounding islands. The male of this species is a colourful mix of yellow, green and blue with two long ornamental tail feathers. The female, however, is really rather dull. To show off their magnificent plumage the males perform elaborate courtship displays, beginning with a good cleanup of the area. After a brief mating, both sexes go their separate ways, hoping to find other opportunities elsewhere1Magnificent frigatebird (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Magnificent_FrigatebirdMagnificent frigatebirds are almost silent seabirds found off the American and tropical coasts. These large birds make gliding and soaring look effortless as they use thermals to gain heights of up to 2,500 metres. The males gather during the breeding season and inflate red throat pouches like balloons to attract a mate. Magnificent frigatebirds were known as man-o'-war birds for their habit of catching and shaking other birds, then stealing the food the captive birds were forced to disgorge.1Mallard (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/MallardMallards are the archetypal and most recognisable ducks. They are found wherever there is water, from rivers and lakes to remote ponds and coastal marshes. It is their adaptablility to all kinds of environment that has brought mallards to towns and parks. The males sport a glossy green head and white neck ring, and what the females lack in colour they make up for in noise. The familiar 'quack' is the call of the female summoning her ducklings. Mallards are the ancestors of many breeds of domestic duck and readily interbreed with them.1Malleefowl (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/MalleefowlMalleefowl are famed for their habit of making huge compost heaps on which the female lays her eggs. The males bury the eggs, to take advantage of the heat from the rotting vegetation for incubation. The males constantly have to check the heap's temperature, adding or removing a covering of sand to regulate it.1Mandarin duck (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Mandarin_DuckMandarin ducks in Britain are the descendants of captive-bred ducks which escaped or were deliberately released. Mandarins are one of the few duck species which are not hunted for food - apparently they taste really bad!1Maned wolf (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Maned_wolfManed wolves have unusually long legs, and have been described as looking like a red fox on stilts.1Manta ray (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Manta_rayManta rays are one of the most easily identified fish off tropical shores, owing to their large, triangular pectoral 'wings' that can span up to nearly 7m. Several fish species, including wrasse and remora, share symbiotic relationships with manta rays, ridding the ray of parasites, dead skin and fallen food and sometimes hitching a ride in the process. Fins at the front of the manta ray's head are said to resemble devils' horns, resulting in the alternative names devilfish or devil ray.1Marine iguana (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Marine_IguanaMarine iguanas are the only marine lizards on Earth. They are usually grey or black, but develop red or green patches in the mating season, probably from eating particular types of seaweed which are available then.1Markhor (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/MarkhorMarkhors belong to a group of animals called 'goat-antelopes', which includes the musk ox, the chamois and the domestic goat. Markhor have spiralling horns, which can grow to over a metre and a half long in males.1Marvellous spatuletail (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Marvellous_SpatuletailMarvellous spatuletails are hummingbirds found only in the forest edges of a remote valley in northern Peru. They only have four tail feathers and in the male the outer two are elongated and end in a violet-blue disc or spatule. These remarkable tail feathers are frantically waved by the male as he hovers in front of the female during a display of his fitness as a mate. Alas, they also make him a target for a slingshot, hence males are outnumbered by more than five to one.1Matschie's tree-kangaroo (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Matschie%27s_Tree-kangarooTree kangaroos are the marsupial equivalent of monkeys, but only evolved about 5 million years ago, so are not as agile in the trees. They have, however, evolved features to help them in their climbing lifestyle – stout, muscular forearms for a stronger grip, long tails for balance and broad feet with non-slip soles.1Matschie's tree-kangaroo (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Matschie's_Tree-kangarooTree kangaroos are the marsupial equivalent of monkeys, but only evolved about 5 million years ago, so are not as agile in the trees. They have, however, evolved features to help them in their climbing lifestyle – stout, muscular forearms for a stronger grip, long tails for balance and broad feet with non-slip soles.1Meerkat (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/MeerkatMeerkats are social mongooses that spend a lot of their time on guard, looking out for predators. They live in colonies of up to 30 members and can be quite comical as they pop up to swap guard duty and look like they're going to fall over like dominoes as they get tired.1<url>http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Megapode</url><description>No description available</description><color>1</color><sources/></node><node><title>Mexican free-tailed bat (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Mexican_Free-tailed_BatMexican free-tailed bats form some of the largest congregations of mammals on the planet. One cave in Texas is estimated to contain 20 million individuals. These large colonies consume an enormous number of insects every night, many of which are agricultural pests. Mexican free-tailed bats forage for food for longer and go further afield than other bats, travelling at around 80kph (50mph) when flying over open ground.1Monarch butterfly (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Monarch_%28butterfly%29Monarch butterflies perform one of the world's most spectacular, annual, long-distance migrations. As autumn approaches millions leave the breeding grounds in the north and head south to wintering grounds - although it is subsequent generations that complete the return journey in the spring. The monarch's orange colour is a warning for predators to stay away, as the chemicals they get from feeding on milkweed plants makes the butterflies poisonous.1Monarch butterfly (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Monarch_(butterfly)Monarch butterflies perform one of the world's most spectacular, annual, long-distance migrations. As autumn approaches millions leave the breeding grounds in the north and head south to wintering grounds - although it is subsequent generations that complete the return journey in the spring. The monarch's orange colour is a warning for predators to stay away, as the chemicals they get from feeding on milkweed plants makes the butterflies poisonous.1Mongolian gazelle (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Mongolian_gazelleMongolian gazelles, sometimes known as zeren, are nomadic and wander across remote corners of Mongolia in search of grazing. They sometimes form mega-herds, with the largest ever recorded having around 250,000 members.1Amethystine python (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Morelia_amethistinaAmethystine pythons are one of the largest snakes in the world. The young spend most of their time in trees, but the adults are more likely to be on the ground. Warm-blooded prey are detected at night by a series of heat-seeking pits along the jaw.1Mountain hare (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Mountain_HareMountain hares are Britain's only native hare and have been here since the Ice Age. Mountain hares change colour in winter, becoming white to camouflage them against the snow. They are also known as blue hares as one of their summer colour forms is a bluish grey.1Musk ox (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/MuskoxMuskoxen are truly arctic animals, well-adapted to their extreme environment with a superbly insulated, long, thick coat of dark brown hair and woolly undercoat. They became extinct across much of their range in Europe and Alaska, largely as a result of overhunting, but have been successfully reintroduced.1Natterjack toad (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Natterjack_ToadNatterjack toads are claimed to be Europe's noisiest amphibian, with the male call audible over several kilometres. Natterjacks are found in southwest and central Europe, but are rare in Britain. They can be found in southwest Ireland, pockets of Norfolk and Lincolnshire, along the coast between Lancashire and Dumfries and areas of Hampshire and Surrey where they've been introduced. Being poor swimmers, they drown in deep water if they can't get ashore. Short limbs mean they can't leap very far, and usually only do so as a startle response before going into their normal running gait.1Nightingale (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/NightingaleNightingales are best known for their beautiful vocal abilities. Male birds, especially, sing for hours on end each night during the breeding season. The females select mates based on the quality of this musical performance. Older males have improved mating success due to their larger song repertoire, which can consist of an astonishing 260 variations. Nightingales have declined in Britain in recent years, since grazing roe and muntjac deer have reduced the density of shrubs inhabited by nightingales.1Nile crocodile (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Nile_crocodileNile crocodiles were revered by the ancient Egyptians who worshipped them as the symbol of the god Sobek. Whilst alive they were pampered. When they died they were embalmed and buried in sacred tombs.1Northern goshawk (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Northern_GoshawkNorthern goshawks are strong, powerful birds of prey that live in mature woodlands. Hunting amongst the trees is easy for these skilled fliers, with their rapid turn of speed and excellent manoeuvrability. No small mammal or bird is safe from these fearless and determined predators as they tear through the vegetation after a meal of rabbit or grouse. Once the considerably larger female has attracted her mate with a dramatic aerial display, the pair stays together for life in a nest they've both built.1North American river otter (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/North_American_River_OtterNorth American river otters are excellent swimmers and divers. With ears and noses that can be closed underwater, insulating fur and webbed feet, their long, streamlined bodies are well suited to life in the water. On land they are no slouches either. Like other otters they enjoy mud and snow sliding and splashing around in the water. This may look like just having fun but it also encourages bonding and teaches hunting techniques to the young. River otters live in dens near water and catch fish, crayfish and crabs to eat.1North Island brown kiwi (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/North_Island_Brown_KiwiKiwis are the national bird of New Zealand and North Island brown kiwis are the most common. Like all kiwis the females lay very large eggs, which can be up to a quarter of their own body weight. The male takes over incubation after the females have laid the eggs.1North Pacific giant octopus (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/North_Pacific_Giant_OctopusThe North Pacific giant octopus is the largest octopus species in the world, with a 10m arm span. Living on average 3-5 years they are also one of the longest living octopus species. After a single mating, females lay up to 100,000 eggs in a den and die soon after the eggs have hatched. Males also die soon after mating. It has been estimated that a mature female will have about 280 suckers per arm.1Nubian ibex (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Nubian_IbexNubian ibex are extremely well-adapted to the steep, rocky and mountainous regions that they inhabit in northeast Africa and parts of Arabia. To cope with the hot, arid conditions they have a light-coloured shiny coat that reflects sunlight. They move up and down the precipitous cliffs with ease, and their agility in this hostile environment plays a big part in predator avoidance. Along with some impressive horns the males also have long dark beards used during scent marking and to excite the females.1Olive baboon (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Olive_BaboonOlive baboons live in a matriarchal society, with females leading the troop and males changing troops every few years.1Olive ridley turtles (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Olive_RidleyOlive ridley turtles would once arrive in huge flotillas to nest at sandy beaches, but human influence on their habitat has changed that. One of the smallest species of sea turtle, they are now critically endangered and efforts to protect their nesting sites are being made in many areas.1Asian wild ass (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/OnagerAsian wild asses are the most horse-like of the wild ass species. Living on the flat, arid terrain of Syria, Iran and northern India, these beautiful russet-coated creatures are mostly solitary, but always found within 30km of water. Males defend large territories, mating with the females who wander through them. Encounters between the sexes are infrequent, since the sparse habitat doesn't support dense populations. The Mongolian wild ass is the most abundant sub-species, accounting for 80% of the world population.1Venezuela pebble toad (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Oreophrynella_nigraVenezuela pebble toads have a very unusual defence mechanism, shared with only a few close relatives. They roll themselves up into a ball and bounce down the hill, away from danger. These tiny amphibians weigh so little that if they hold their muscles rigid, the bouncing doesn't damage them at all. Pebble toads also breed communally, so a single nest can contain over 100 toads. One nest found had 103 toads and 321 eggs in it.1Ostrich (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/OstrichOstriches don't need to drink - they can make their own water internally and top up with what they can extract from vegetation. During the 18th century, it became fashionable to wear feathers and ostriches were hunted almost to extinction to satisfy demand for their large plumes. Once it was discovered that they could be farmed successfully, in 1833, the pressure on wild ostrich populations was lifted.1Milu (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/P%C3%A8re_David%27s_DeerMilu or Père David's Deer now only exist in captivity. Curiously, some of the stags can grow and shed a second set of antlers each year.1Milu (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/P%C3%A8re_David's_DeerMilu or Père David's Deer now only exist in captivity. Curiously, some of the stags can grow and shed a second set of antlers each year.1Pantropical spotted dolphin (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Pantropical_Spotted_DolphinPantropical dolphins are the ones on dolphin friendly tuna. They follow shoals of yellowfin tuna in the eastern Pacific and are in turn followed by fishermen after the tuna. Some of the dolphins in tuna fishing areas have learned to avoid boats altogether.1Black-palp wolf spider (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Pardosa_nigricepsBlack-palp wolf spiders are a common species of European wolf spider. They dwell in low vegetation, such as gorse and heather. Only the males have the thick covering of black hair on the palps. When a male finds a female he performs a courtship dance, waving his front legs about and vibrating his abdomen. The female often responds by attacking him, but the male persists. If he's lucky he'll be allowed to climb on to the female and mate with her.1Patagonian mara (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Patagonian_MaraPatagonian maras may look more like giant rabbits or small deer, but they are rodents. They live on the plains and scrubland of Argentina. Males and females form long-term pair bonds, but the young form creches.1Peale's dolphin (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Peale%27s_DolphinPeale's dolphins are a little-known species that inhabit the waters around the southern tip of South America. They live in small family units of 3-8.1Peale's dolphin (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Peale's_DolphinPeale's dolphins are a little-known species that inhabit the waters around the southern tip of South America. They live in small family units of 3-8.1Peregrine falcon (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Peregrine_falconPeregrine falcons are one of, if not the, fastest animals in the world. They are believed to achieve speeds of over 200kph (124mph) when plunging from the sky after prey. This iconic bird of prey is also one of the world's most widely distributed birds, found on every continent except Antarctica. Peregrines prefer open landscapes, but are increasingly exploiting towns and cities where there are tall buildings for nesting and plenty of pigeons for prey. Unlucky victims are captured in vicious talons after a lightning dive from above, but the killing stroke is delivered by the deadly beak.1Perentie (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/PerentiePerenties are the largest of all the Australian monitor lizards, measuring an impressive 2.5 metres. They can run incredibly fast either on all fours, or just their hind legs. If threatened, they distend a large neck pouch and expel a rattling hiss. Should this dramatic display fail, the perentie lunges forward and strikes its opponent before quickly turning and fleeing to hide in the nearest rocky crevice or burrow. They can even bring down smaller species of kangaroo.1Milu (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Père_David's_DeerMilu or Père David's Deer now only exist in captivity. Curiously, some of the stags can grow and shed a second set of antlers each year.1Peruvian anchoveta (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Peruvian_anchovetaPeruvian anchovetas form large shoals close to the coasts of Peru and Chile. Feeding almost entirely on plankton in the Peruvian current, populations can be badly affected by the El Niño phenomenon. Large numbers of birds depend on the anchoveta shoals for their food supply.1Bridal veil stinkhorn (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Phallus_indusiatusBridal veil stinkhorns are fungi that grow in rainforest leaf litter. They get their name from the veil formation that hangs down from the cap. Despite their pretty appearance, they usually smell appalling, as their aim is to attract carrion eating flies which then distribute the spores. Uncommon in the wild, the stinkhorn is now cultivated for use in Chinese cuisine and medicine.1Phayre's leaf monkey (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Phayre%27s_Leaf_MonkeyPhayre's leaf monkeys, or langurs, are old world monkeys that inhabit south east Asian tropical forests. They prefer to eat lots of immature leaves, flowers and fruits, and have an enhanced salivary gland that helps them break down all the tough plant material. When a group is alarmed, the females grab their young and flee through the forest while the males stay behind to bark at the intruders.1Phayre's leaf monkey (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Phayre's_Leaf_MonkeyPhayre's leaf monkeys, or langurs, are old world monkeys that inhabit south east Asian tropical forests. They prefer to eat lots of immature leaves, flowers and fruits, and have an enhanced salivary gland that helps them break down all the tough plant material. When a group is alarmed, the females grab their young and flee through the forest while the males stay behind to bark at the intruders.1Weedy sea dragon (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/PhyllopteryxWeedy seadragons are found among coral reefs, seagrass beds and seaweeds off the south coast of Australia. Like their close relatives the seahorses, male seadragons incubate the eggs in brood pouches, supplying oxygen to the eggs through their own blood vessels.1Pied kingfisher (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Pied_KingfisherPied kingfishers hover far more than any other kingfisher species. They hold their trunk nearly vertical and beat their wings rapidly with their head and bill angled sharply down. The pied plumage is easy to distinguish - it is the only entirely black and white kingfisher.1Hat thrower fungus (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Pilobolus_crystallinusHat-thrower fungi earn their name from their habit of firing spore capsules away from the parent fungus. The spores stick to grass and can safely pass through a grazing animal's digestive tract, so that they emerge from the other end in a dollop of dung. These fungi then grow in the dung completing the life cycle. This fungus rarely reaches 5cm in height, but can propel the spore capsule a mighty 2m away.1Great Basin bristlecone pine (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Pinus_longaevaGreat Basin bristlecone pines are restricted to the mountain ranges of California, Nevada and Utah and have a remarkable ability to survive in this extremely harsh and challenging environment. They grow extremely slowly, and are some of the oldest living organisms in the world. With some aged at almost 5,000 years these amazing trees can reveal information about Earth's climate variations. Amazingly, the leaves, or needles, can remain green for over 45 years.1<url>http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Pitheciidae</url><description>No description available</description><color>1</color><sources/></node><node><title>Plateau pika (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Plateau_PikaPlateau pikas are underground-dwelling relatives of the rabbit that live at high altitudes in Tibet. They are prodigious breeders, producing a litter every three weeks during the summer. Unlike other pika species, male plateau pikas help to look after the offspring.1Platypus (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/PlatypusPlatypuses are both bizarre looking and unusually adapted. They belong to a sub-group of mammals that lay eggs rather than giving birth to live young (monotremes). When the first platypus was shipped to Britain from Australia, people thought it was a joke and that someone had sewn a duck's bill to a mammal's body. Even when accepted as real, it was thought to be a bird or a reptile as it laid eggs.1Polar bear (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Polar_bearPolar bears are the largest living land carnivores and have a reputation as the only animal that actively hunts humans, assuming anything they encounter to be potential prey. Polar bears can eat a diet pretty much entirely composed of seal blubber without getting heart disease, as seal fat is naturally polyunsaturated.1Pompeii worm (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Pompeii_wormPompeii worms live in the hot water around hydrothermal vents in the Pacific Ocean and can tolerate a water temperature up to 80 degrees centigrade. They have a thick coating of symbiotic bacteria which may help to insulate them against this heat.1Purple emperor butterfly (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Purple_EmperorThe purple emperor is a large brown butterfly with iridescent wings that shine blue or purple in the light. Purple emperors do not feed from flowers. Instead they feed from honeydew secreted by aphids, and even from dung and rotting animal carcasses. Their caterpillars feed on pussy willow (sallow) plants.1English oak (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Quercus_roburEnglish oaks are a symbol of great strength and endurance. These magnificent trees grow to well over 30 metres and can live for 1,000 years or more. Flowering begins in late spring, with the fruits (acorns) ripening in time for autumn. Acorns grow in clusters and are an important source of food for many birds and small mammals, particularly jays and squirrels who cache away the acorns for later consumption. Being deciduous, oaks lose their distinctive lobed and wavy leaves in winter. They have been a prized source of timber since prehistoric times and it's said that an oak tree hid king Charles II from the Roundheads at Boscobel.1Ruppell's vulture (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/R%C3%BCppell%27s_VultureRuppell's vultures, named after a German explorer, are large African vultures. Much of their day is spent soaring in the air on thermal currents, at some surprisingly high altitudes, and using their keen eyesight to spot long forgotten carcasses. They home in on the carcass in flocks and with all the tasty flesh gone, these scavengers will eat what's left over, using their powerful hooked beaks to tear skin and break bones with ease. A decline in the range of these very social birds is partly a result of their being used in black magic.1Ruppell's vulture (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/R%C3%BCppell's_VultureRuppell's vultures, named after a German explorer, are large African vultures. Much of their day is spent soaring in the air on thermal currents, at some surprisingly high altitudes, and using their keen eyesight to spot long forgotten carcasses. They home in on the carcass in flocks and with all the tasty flesh gone, these scavengers will eat what's left over, using their powerful hooked beaks to tear skin and break bones with ease. A decline in the range of these very social birds is partly a result of their being used in black magic.1Raccoon (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/RaccoonRaccoons are adaptable nocturnal animals that often live in urban environments in North America. They have extremely dextrous hands, with a very well developed sense of touch.1Raggiana bird of paradise (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Raggiana_Bird_of_ParadiseRaggianas have one of the most spectacular courtship displays of all the birds of paradise. The males perform feather shaking, wing clapping and head shakes on perches at a lekking site. The male's highly-coloured feathers are collected by local people for wearing during ceremonies and festivals.1Red-billed quelea (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Red-billed_QueleaRed-billed queleas are a kind of weaver bird and form flocks which can contain thousands of birds. Because seeds are a major part of their diet, these huge flocks can do considerable damage to fields of cereal crops.1Red-billed tropicbird (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Red-billed_TropicbirdRed-billed tropicbirds are the largest of the the three tropicbird species, and are named after their curved, crimson bills. These tropical seabirds spend most of their time over the open water (pelagic), only coming on to remote oceanic islands to breed and lay a single egg. Red-billed tropicbirds fly high over the water before diving down to catch fish and squid.1Red-crowned crane (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Red-crowned_CraneRed-crowned cranes almost became fashion victims at the beginning of the 20th century. They were hunted to the brink of extinction in Japan so that their stunning plumage could be used to adorn hats and other fashion accessories. Hunting these cranes is now illegal.1Red deer (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Red_DeerRed deer are the largest of the UK's resident deer species and have lived in the UK since the Ice Age. Their impressive rut is a familiar autumn spectacle.1Red fox (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Red_FoxRed foxes have overtaken grey wolves as the most widespread canines in the wild. Distributed throughout the northern hemisphere, red foxes are highly adaptable and occupy territories in deserts and tundra as well as urban areas. They live in family groups in dens and eat most things including small mammals, fruit, carrion and the contents of dustbins. As well as having excellent vision, smell and touch these bushy-tailed true foxes can produce 28 different calls.1Red kangaroo (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Red_KangarooRed kangaroos are the largest marsupials and probably one of the best known of Australia's native animals. They live in small groups in the dry, central areas of Australia.1Red kite (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Red_KiteRed kites have suffered rapid population declines due to habitat loss, pesticide usage and persecution. They usually pair for life building large nests out of sticks in the forks of tree branches. Females signal fledlings to play dead at the first signs of a predator. This mighty bird of prey is primarily a scavenger, and eats mostly carrion.1Knot (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Red_KnotKnots, known as red knots in America as a result of their lovely red summer plumage, are stocky wading and shore birds. They undertake one of the longest migrations of any animal from their Arctic breeding grounds to the coasts and estuaries of Europe, Africa and Australia where they spend the winter feasting on invertebrates. They often form large, wheeling flocks that contain in excess of 100,000 birds.1Red panda (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Red_PandaRed pandas were once thought to be closely related to the giant panda, but genetics has shown they are more closely allied with the raccoon and weasel families. They are secretive and gentle creatures, spending most of the day sleeping curled up with their tail wrapped around their head.1Red squirrel (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Red_SquirrelRed squirrels were once the only species of squirrel in Europe. This changed with the introduction of the grey squirrel to the UK from America in the late 1800s. Spending most of their time in the tree tops, red squirrels make use of several dreys inside their range. They don't hibernate, but remain in the drey for several days at a time during bad weather.1Reindeer (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/ReindeerReindeer, as they are known in Europe and Asia, and caribou in the Americas, are large deers adapted for arctic conditions. They live in huge herds and, unusually for deer, both males and females have antlers.1Ring-tailed lemur (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Ring-tailed_LemurRing-tailed lemurs are the most easily recognisable of all the lemur species, they're the only ones to have a long, bushy and black-and-white striped tail. Spending more time in open spaces than the other lemurs of Madagascar, ring-tailed lemurs are also very sociable and groups will soak up the early morning sun together, sitting cross-legged in a yoga position. Females share the parental duties in crèches.1Pigeon (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Rock_PigeonPigeons are domesticated rock doves that have returned to wild or semi-wild conditions. Some were domesticated for food, others as homing pigeons and some as ‘fancy’ pigeons bred for their plumage. Wild rock doves feed on seeds but the diet of the pigeon has grown to include food discarded by well-intentioned people. With all this food available, numbers are on the up, but these colourful, head-bobbing city dwellers don't have everything their own way. Peregrine falcons are increasingly exploiting them as a food source.1Roe deer (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Roe_DeerRoe deer are one of Britain's native deer species and have become the most widespread. They became largely extinct in the 1700s and were only later reintroduced. Before 1960 they were treated as vermin owing to the damage they cause to the forestry industry. Unlike other deer, they do not live in herds, but are most often seen as solitary individuals or as a family group of a mother and her offspring. Does gives birth to one to three fawns in May or June. Bambi the deer, from the children's books by Felix Salten, was a roe deer.1Rook (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Rook_%28bird%29Rooks often earned the ire of farmers for their omnivorous diet which includes seeds and root crops. In spite of their reputation for intelligence, they can't tell the difference between discarded turnips, those that a farmer has put out for his sheep and those which he wishes to sell.1Rook (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Rook_(bird)Rooks often earned the ire of farmers for their omnivorous diet which includes seeds and root crops. In spite of their reputation for intelligence, they can't tell the difference between discarded turnips, those that a farmer has put out for his sheep and those which he wishes to sell.1Ringnecked parakeet (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Rose-ringed_ParakeetRing-necked parakeets are the only species of parrot that live wild in the UK. These birds are descended from pets and aviary birds which have escaped or were deliberately released, and now breed in south-east England, although they have been spotted as far afield as Wales and Scotland.1Rufous elephant shrew (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Rufous_Elephant_ShrewRufous elephant shrews are small mouse-like animals found on the plains, savannas and forest floors of east Africa. Their long mobile snouts can be moved around much like an elephant's trunk in their endless search for ants, termites and worms. These shrews are escape specialists: they make a series of pathways away from their nests which they shoot down rapidly at the first signs of a predator.1Ruppell's vulture (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Rüppell's_VultureRuppell's vultures, named after a German explorer, are large African vultures. Much of their day is spent soaring in the air on thermal currents, at some surprisingly high altitudes, and using their keen eyesight to spot long forgotten carcasses. They home in on the carcass in flocks and with all the tasty flesh gone, these scavengers will eat what's left over, using their powerful hooked beaks to tear skin and break bones with ease. A decline in the range of these very social birds is partly a result of their being used in black magic.1Saguaros (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/SaguaroSaguaros are the giant, classicly shaped cacti that characterise the deserts of Arizona and Mexico. They absorb and store huge amounts of water after the summer rains, which can increase the weight of a large speciment by 750-900kg. The stored water enables the saguaro to flower every year, even if the rainfall has been lower than average. They are pollinated by bats, birds and bees, with the seeds dispersed by birds that eat the juicy, red fruits.1Saiga (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Saiga_AntelopeSaigas are weird looking antelopes, equipped with a large, proboscis-like nose that is key to their survival in the seasonal extremes of their range. Large air sacs in the nose extract valuable moisture from exhaled air and also warm up the cold air as it is breathed in.1Sand goanna (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Sand_goannaSand goannas are active predators. Their constant tongue flicking during hunting allows them to detect the scent of hidden or buried prey. The females lay their eggs in the centre of an active termite mound and the resident termites keep the temperature and humidity just right for egg development.1Sand martin (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Sand_MartinSand martins are so named, because they nest in sandy river banks or sandy coastal cliffs. The males dig burrows in the cliff and the females then do any final excavations needed to turn the burrows into nest chambers.1<url>http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Scarabaeidae</url><description>No description available</description><color>1</color><sources/></node><node><title/><url>http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Sciuridae</url><description>No description available</description><color>1</color><sources/></node><node><title>Sea otter (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Sea_otterSea otters are one of the largest otter species. Rarely coming ashore, sea otters spend most of their time in the kelp forests off the west coast of America, Alaska and Russia. To keep warm they have the densest fur of all mammals but no insulating body fat. When resting or sleeping sea otters float on their backs wrapped in kelp and often holding paws with another individual so they don't drift apart. Stones are used as tools for dislodging and cracking open molluscs.1Serval (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/ServalServals are long-legged cats that are capable of making very impressive leaps into the air when hunting birds: up to 3m straight up!1Short-beaked common dolphin (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Short-beaked_Common_DolphinCommon short-beaked dolphins are the most numerous dolphins in the world, and can be seen in British waters. They are very social creatures and are seldom alone. The whole school (usually 10 to 500 individuals) can all be leaping in the air at one time.1Short-eared owl (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Short-eared_OwlShort-eared owls can be diurnal (active during the day) as well as nocturnal (active at night). The males perform an aerial display that includes wing clapping to alert their presence to females. They may offer food as a bribe to win females over.1Siamang (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/SiamangSiamangs are both the largest of the gibbons and the loudest: their territorial calls are amplified by a throat sac that can be inflated to the size their head. They are supremely well adapted to life in the treetops of the Malaysian and Indonesian rainforests, from their acrobatic, hand-over-hand swinging through the branches to using the branches as a bed. They are the only gibbons to have webbing between their second and third toes.1Siberian crane (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Siberian_craneSiberian cranes are the only crane species with serrated edges on their beaks. The serrations make gripping slippery prey, such as fish and frogs, much easier. Siberian cranes also eat roots, berries and seeds.1Siberian salamander (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Siberian_salamanderThe siberian salamander is the only salamander to be found within the Arctic Circle. This remarkable amphibian can survive being frozen for long periods of time at temperatures of less than 35 degrees centigrade. It manages this by replacing its water with 'anti-freeze' chemicals.1Snares crested penguin (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Snares_PenguinSnare's crested penguins generally form lifelong bonds with their mates. During the breeding season there is lots of fighting and noise to establish territories and resources, as the penguins prefer to use the same nest site every year.1Snow goose (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Snow_GooseSnow geese are migrants, nesting on the Arctic tundra and flying as far south as Texas and Mexico when winter returns. Mating occurs during the long migration back to the tundra.1Snow leopard (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Snow_leopardSnow leopards are one of the most beautiful of the cats, and are also exceptional athletes capable of making huge leaps over ravines. These powerful cats can bring down prey almost three times their own size.1Snow petrel (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Snow_PetrelSnow petrels frequent Antarctica and the surrounding seas. They feeds out at sea, but breed on the coast and spend the winter on the pack ice. They've even been spotted at the South Pole.1Sockeye salmon (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Sockeye_salmonSockeye salmon live in the northern Pacific Ocean, but breed in freshwater. They return to the freshwater systems of their birth in June and July, guided home by the characteristic odour of their parent stream. During spawning, each female deposits 2,000 eggs then both the males and females die soon after. Young salmon mature in the freshwater nurseries, and at two years of age finally depart for the open ocean. There are also landlocked populations of the sockeye that never return to the sea.1Socotra cormorant (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Socotra_CormorantSocotra cormorants can have breeding colonies and foraging flock populations numbering in the tens of thousands. They breed only on islands in the Middle East, and are threatened by coastal development in the area.1Southern carmine bee-eater (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Southern_Carmine_Bee-eaterSouthern carmine bee eaters form large flocks and nest in burrows dug into riverbanks. As their name suggests, they eat mainly bees though they also consume other flying insects1Southern Elephant Seal (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Southern_Elephant_SealSouthern elephant seal males weigh 8 to 10 times more than females, which is the biggest weight difference of any mammal. Both sexes can dive very deep, and regularly reach depths between 400 to 1,500 metres. They can even sleep underwater.1Southern three-banded armadillo (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Southern_Three-banded_ArmadilloSouthern three-banded armadillos are the only armadillo species that can roll up into a ball, enclosing its vulnerable parts inside its shell. Baby southern three-banded armadillos are born blind and can't roll up like this at first.1South American coati (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/South_American_CoatiSouth American coatis are omnivorous members of the raccoon family and have long mobile snouts, reddish fur and ringed tails. Male coatis were once thought to be a separate species from the females because of their solitary habits, and were called 'coatimundis'. The females live in highly social groups.1South American grey fox (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/South_American_Gray_FoxSouth American grey foxes are also known as grey Zorros. These small foxes are native to South America, although they have been introduced to the Falkland Islands.1Southern sea lion (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/South_American_Sea_LionSouthern sea lions are also known as maned seals. Males are approximately three times the size of females. Although no commercial hunting of South American sea lions occurs nowadays, numbers were heavily depleted during the 19th and early 20th centuries.1South polar skua (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/South_Polar_SkuaSouth polar skuas breed in Antarctica and the South Shetland islands, but can be found found as far afield as Australia, Brazil and Japan.1Spaghetti tree (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/SpaghettiSpaghetti trees are an important commercial crop plant and well-known example of where money almost literally grows on trees. Although they can be grown worldwide, the best quality and flavour comes from the mountainous Alpine regions of Switzerland and Italy. In the 1950s, after many years of dedicated breeding, the Alpine farmers enjoyed a spaghetti heyday, producing pasta of perfectly uniform size and taste. They had also all but eradicated the spaghetti weevil that had such a devastating effect on the crop in other areas.1Spectacled bear (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Spectacled_BearSpectacled bears are the last remaining representatives of the short-faced bears, and are the only bear species found in South America.1Springbok (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Springbok_%28antelope%29Springboks adapt their diet to the time of year, grazing on grass in the wet season and browsing on shrubs in the dry season.1Springbok (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Springbok_(antelope)Springboks adapt their diet to the time of year, grazing on grass in the wet season and browsing on shrubs in the dry season.1Star-nosed mole (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Star-nosed_MoleStar-nosed moles are distinctive mammals with a bizarre set of tentacles surrounding the nose. The 22 tentacles are extremely sensitive to touch and to electrical impulses and allow the moles to find and identify their invertebrate prey without using sight. This multifunctional 'star' is also used to keep soil and food from entering the nose. Native to eastern north America, star-nosed moles dig a network of tunnels, some as long as 270m, through poorly drained moist soil. They're also surprisingly good swimmers.1Stoat (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/StoatStoats turn completely white in winter, except for the black tips of their tails. During this time, they are called 'ermine'. Stoats in northern Britain are more likely to turn completely white than their southern counterparts.1Straw-coloured fruit bat (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Straw-coloured_Fruit_BatStraw-coloured fruit bats are the most widely distributed of the African fruit bats and live and travel in vast colonies numbering into the millions. They roost in tall trees, and go off in smaller foraging groups at night searching for ripe fruits. After noisily sucking out the juice from a fruit, they discard the pulp, which makes them important pollinators and seed dispersers. They also chew wood and bark to obtain moisture.1Striped Skunk (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Striped_SkunkStriped skunks are one of the most distinctive animals of North America. Faced with grave danger the skunk will turn around, raise its tail and squirt a fluid from two scent glands. Travelling as far as two to three metres, this foul smelling fluid can cause nausea and burning of the eyes and nose - no wonder they have few natural predators.1Purple sea urchin (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Strongylocentrotus_purpuratusThe purple sea urchin lives in kelp forests. It will eat any sort of algae, but kelp is its favourite food. These urchins are considered to be a delicacy in Japan.1Sumatran orangutan (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Sumatran_OrangutanSumatran orangutans are even more endangered than their Bornean counterparts, with numbers in the wild estimated at under 8,000. They are only found in the forests of the Indonesian island of Sumatra, and are the largest of the tree-dwelling primates. They rarely venture out of the canopy where they build nests to sleep or nap in. A large appetite for fruit makes these primates very important to forest ecology as dispersers of seeds.1Malayan colugo (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Sunda_Flying_LemurColugos are little known forest-dwelling animals that have huge gliding membranes, similar to flying squirrels. This enables them to make spectacular leaps from tree to tree in the Asian rainforests.1Sunflower star (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Sunflower_starfishSunflower stars have more arms than other starfish, sometimes having as many as twenty four! They can grow very large, becoming as much as 80cm (31in) across.1Superb bird of paradise (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Superb_Bird_of_ParadiseMale superb birds of paradise carry a two-pronged, iridescent blue shield on their breasts. They have small territories which they defend from other males. Within this territory they might have one or two preferred spots, such as a particular tree branch, from where they call and display to visiting females.1Superb lyrebird (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Superb_LyrebirdSuperb lyrebirds are famed for their extraordinary ability to mimic. They imitate other bird calls, as well as human sounds such as car alarms and camera shutters.1Surinam toad (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Suriname_ToadSurinam toads have a unique spawning ritual and reproduction method. Following an extraordinary mating dance, where the female lays her eggs on the male's belly, the male then fertilises the eggs and rolls them into pouches on her back. After bypassing the larval stage completely, fully developed froglet miniatures pop out of the holes in the mother's skin. Large flippered feet and greatly flattened bodies make these amphibians well suited to life in South America's murky ponds and swamps.1Tambaqui (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/TambaquiTambaqui are large, solitary freshwater fish found in South America. After the forests have flooded these fish feast on fruits, grains and nuts using their very strong teeth. These largely herbivorous fish are in the same sub-family as the carnivorous piranhas.1Tasmanian devil (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Tasmanian_DevilTasmanian devils are carnivorous marsupials, though they will also happily eat carrion or steal scraps of food that humans have left lying about.1Tawny owl (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Tawny_OwlTawny owls are the most common and widespread owl in Europe. They are also the owl that emits the characteristic 'twit-twoo' call, although it is actually a duet between the male and the female.1Temminck's tragopan (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Temminck%27s_TragopanTemminck's tragopans are a type of pheasant. The males have striking colours and use these to best effect in a dancing display designed to impress the females.1Temminck's tragopan (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Temminck's_TragopanTemminck's tragopans are a type of pheasant. The males have striking colours and use these to best effect in a dancing display designed to impress the females.1Eastern box turtle (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Terrapene_carolinaEastern box turtles are only found along the eastern side of North America. They live near streams and ponds in the woodlands and marshy meadows. To hide from danger, box turtles have a hinged shell into which they retreat before clamping it shut. This regenerating body armour is incredibly effective at keeping out even the most determined of predators. Nest temperature plays a crucial role in determining whether the young are male (below 27 centigrade) or female (above 27 degrees).1Texas blind salamander (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Texas_blind_salamanderTexas blind salamanders live in caves where little of not light penetrates. They have vestigial eyes which are covered over by skin as they aren't needed in this environment.1Tibetan spring snake (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Thermophis_baileyiBailey's snakes are only found within half a mile of Chutsen Chugang hot springs in the mountains of Tibet. They are one of the few snake species that live at such high altitudes.1Thomson's gazelle (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Thomson%27s_GazelleThomson's gazelles are found mainly in Tanzania and Kenya, and there's a small population in southern Sudan. They form herds of up to 200 individuals, but form much looser groups while migrating. Like other gazelles they perform 'stotting' or 'pronking' when alarmed by a predator. This involves jumping repeatedly with legs stiff and back curved and landing on all fours. Stotting is thought to demonstrate to the predator the amount of energy the gazelle has and thus to forestall a long chase by telling it 'I'm too athletic for you to catch'.1Thomson's gazelle (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Thomson's_GazelleThomson's gazelles are found mainly in Tanzania and Kenya, and there's a small population in southern Sudan. They form herds of up to 200 individuals, but form much looser groups while migrating. Like other gazelles they perform 'stotting' or 'pronking' when alarmed by a predator. This involves jumping repeatedly with legs stiff and back curved and landing on all fours. Stotting is thought to demonstrate to the predator the amount of energy the gazelle has and thus to forestall a long chase by telling it 'I'm too athletic for you to catch'.1Thorny devil (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Thorny_DevilThorny devils have extremely sharp spines that effectively deter any predators that might want to bite or swallow it.1Tibetan fox (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Tibetan_Sand_FoxTibetan foxes are a small species of true fox that live high up on the remote Tibetan plain. Their unusual square faces make them instantly recognisable.1Tiger (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/TigerTigers are the largest of all the cats. Sadly, this magnificent animal has been pushed to the edge through hunting and habitat loss. Three of the eight subspecies have already become extinct, and other species are at high risk.1Tiger quoll (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Tiger_QuollTiger quolls are the largest carnivorous marsupials on the Australian mainland, but on Tasmania they are dwarfed by the Tasmanian devil.1Tiger shark (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Tiger_sharkTiger sharks have been nicknamed the dustbins of the sea, due to their voracious appetite and reputation for eating anything in their path. They are second to great whites as the record holders of attacks on humans. This is partly due to their occurrence in shallow waters and their indiscriminate feeding habits.1Shingleback skink (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Tiliqua_rugosaShingleback skinks are very common reptiles of the drier woodlands and plains of southern Australia. Large, rough scales give this blue-tongued skink the appeareance of a pine cone. If the heavy body armour isn't enough to put off potential predators, the shingleback skink has a further trick: its short and stumpy tail resembles its head and can be detached in times of dire need. This is a last resort, as the tail is used as a vital fat store during the winter.1Tisza mayfly (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Tisza_MayflyThe giant or Tisza mayfly is Europe's largest species of mayfly. Unlike other mayfly species, the adults never lose contact with the water surface, trailing their tails along it as they swarm. Sometimes they become confused, however, and mistake wet road surfaces for the river.1Titan arum (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Titan_arumTitan arums are true giants amongst flowering plants: the circumference of their huge flowers can be over three metres and they stand three metres high and the single leaf grows to the size of a small tree. Their smell, likened to rotting meat, is so bad it led to the common name 'corpse flower'. Both the 'fragance' and the flower's meat-colouration attract pollinators - carrion flies and beetles. The common name was given by Sir David Attenborough during the filming of the Private Life of Plants series.1Tufted capuchin (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Tufted_CapuchinTufted capuchins are relatively common in the forests and rainforests of south America. These monkeys use a most unusual method of attracting their mates, they rub urine into their own fur. The results of a successful mating, young capuchins are carried around by their mother for months, by clinging to her fur. Hawks and eagles are so feared as predators that alarm calls are sounded at the sight of any bird shadows. These monkeys are well known for using stones to crack open nuts.1Venus flytrap (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Venus_FlytrapVenus flytraps are carnivorous plants native to a small region of wetlands in the eastern United States. They have however been introduced to other areas of the world and are popular as houseplants. The flytrap snaps shut and imprisons its prey when triggered by a time- and touch-sensitive mechanism. Once the prey has been digested, the trap re-opens ready for another victim. Each individual trap on the Venus flytrap can only operate three or four times, after which it photosynthesizes like a normal leaf or dies back.1Verreaux's sifaka (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Verreaux%27s_SifakaVerreaux's sifakas are tree-dwelling lemurs of the Madagascan forests. They live and forage for food in small troops, eating almost any plant parts that are above ground. Though adapted for a life spent in spiny trees, these lemurs still have to cross open ground occasionally. They do this up on their hind legs with their forearms held up high for balance. The name sifaka comes from the noisy barking call they make during territorial confrontations.1Verreaux's sifaka (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Verreaux's_SifakaVerreaux's sifakas are tree-dwelling lemurs of the Madagascan forests. They live and forage for food in small troops, eating almost any plant parts that are above ground. Though adapted for a life spent in spiny trees, these lemurs still have to cross open ground occasionally. They do this up on their hind legs with their forearms held up high for balance. The name sifaka comes from the noisy barking call they make during territorial confrontations.1Common wasp (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Vespula_vulgarisCommon wasps are instantly recognisable because of their yellow and black stripes. They are social insects and live in underground nests of up to 10,000 workers. The wasps do not construct their own burrow but will choose one which already exists, such as an abandoned animal burrow, a corner of a garden shed, or the loft of a house.1Vogelkop bowerbird (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Vogelkop_BowerbirdVogelkop bowerbirds are found in New Guinea and are named after the beautiful shelters they build to attract mates. Each bowerbird population makes slightly different bowers. Some use colourful flowers or leaves, some may choose stones or other objects and they lay these out in their own patterns, perhaps in response to the divergent tastes of females in the area.1Walia ibex (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Walia_IbexWalia ibex are a type of goat that live 2,500-4,500m up the steep cliffs of the Ethiopian highlands. They remained immune to human interference until modern firearms made hunting a feasible activity in their almost impassible rocky homes. Since then, their numbers have declined sharply.1Walrus (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/WalrusWalruses are famous for their tusks and are the only pinnipeds (true seals, sea lions and fur seals) that have them. The tusks can grow up to 1m in length, and males tend to have larger tusks than females. The tusks are used for keeping breathing holes in the ice open, for fighting and for helping the walruses haul themselves out of the water on to an ice floe.1Wandering albatross (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Wandering_AlbatrossWandering albatrosses hold the record for the bird with the largest wingspan, with some individuals measuring 3.5 metres. They spend most of their life on the wing, returning to land only to court a mate and to breed.1Warthog (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/WarthogWarthogs are common wild pigs found in the open woodlands and savannas of Africa. Family groups are called soundings. Warthogs never stray far from wallowing places used for cooling down during the day, and the burrrows in which they huddle together for warmth at night. When it comes to their main predator, the lion, warthogs wisely flee rather than fight. They back into their burrows so they face any intruders, tusks facing out. However, their large curved upper tusks and sharper lower tusks are more often used to dig up roots and bulbs.1Waved albatross (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Waved_AlbatrossWaved albatrosses breed in the Galápagos Islands. After they leave the nest, young waved albatrosses will spend six years at sea before they return to land once more.1Weddell seal (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Weddell_SealWeddell seals were named after a British sea commander in the 1800s, Sir James Weddell who also has a sea in the Antarctic named after him. These seals live and swim in groups around cracks and breathing holes in the pack ice of the Antarctic, even chewing holes through particularly thin areas of ice with their canine teeth. Weddell seals can drink sea water and they also eat snow. They can remain underwater for up to an hour while hunting.1Capercaillie (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Western_CapercaillieCapercaillies found in Scottish woodlands are the biggest species of grouse in the world. They also live in Spain, central Europe, Scandinavia and across Russia to northern Asia. The Scottish population was introduced from Sweden in the 19th century after the local birds became extinct.1Western gorilla (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Western_GorillaWestern gorillas are recognisable from their eastern cousins by an overhanging tip on the end of the nose. There are two subspecies of western gorilla: the western lowland gorilla and the cross river gorilla.1Western red colobus (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Western_Red_ColobusWestern red colobuses live in large groups, with sometimes as many as 50 members. They are leaf-eaters, and use their colour vision to select the youngest leaves since these are protein-rich and more easily digested.1Whale shark (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Whale_sharkWhale sharks are the largest fish in the world, the longest ever recorded being some 13.5m in length. Fortunately they are filter feeders and are harmless to humans.1White-fronted bee-eater (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/White-fronted_Bee-eaterWhite-fronted bee-eaters are found in the river banks and gullies of wooded grassland and pastures of sub-equatorial Africa. Their diet of insects, which is almost always honey bees, is caught either through rapid flight down from a low tree perch or during a slower hovering flight. These bee-eaters live in a very complex society, nesting in colonies made up of family clans where non-breeding birds become helpers for their breeding relatives.1White-tailed sea eagle (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/White-tailed_EagleWhite-tailed sea eagles are found near large bodies of water and coastlines across Europe and parts of Asia. Standing at an impressive 1m high with a 2.5m wingspan, they are the largest eagles in Europe and the fourth largest in the world. Sea eagles hover over water, plucking fish from the surface with their strong talons and often eating them in flight. They became extinct in Britain during the early 1900s and were re-introduced to Scotland in 1975 where they've since started to breed.1Whitebark pine (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Whitebark_PineWhitebark pines are one of the world's five stone pine species. They are slow-growing and long-lived high altitude pines from the mountainous forests of northwest America. Where conditions are harsh and soils poor, the trees are dwarfed and grow close to the ground, but given favourable conditions, they can reach 25 metres in height. Seeds develop in the cone and are an important food source for many birds and mammals. Clark's nutcrackers harvest the seeds from within the cone and disperse them by caching them in locations ripe for germination.1White rhinoceros (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/White_RhinocerosWhite rhinos are named after a corruption of their Afrikaans name 'weit' (meaning wide), describing their jaw rather than their colour. They have two horns on their head, the front one being the larger. Their wide, flat mouths are adapted for grazing: they don't have incisor teeth, but use their lips instead to tear off mouthfuls of grass.1Whooper swan (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Whooper_SwanWhooper swans are large migratory bird that often fly in large 'V' formations. They can be distinguished from Bewick swans by their larger size, and from mute swans by their yellow bill colour.1Wild boar (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Wild_boarWild boars roam the oak forests and shrublands of Europe, Asia and north Africa. These large, bristly haired pigs are the ancestors of our farmyard pigs which have been domesticated for thousands of years. Their four, continually growing tusks are kept nice and sharp for fighting off other males during the breeding season, or when backed into a corner by a large predator. Injuries inflicted can be severe, especially after a powerful charge. Wallowing in mud and water helps to protect the wild boar against sunburn and biting insects.1Wire-tailed manakin (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Wire-tailed_ManakinWire-tailed manakins live in the rainforests of Central and South America. The males gather on display grounds to strut their stuff for the females. Each male has his own private dancing perch upon which he performs.1Wood stork (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Wood_StorkWood storks are large wading birds which can have a wing-span of up to 180cm. They rely on exceptionally quick reflexes to catch small fish in shallow waters.1Yacare caiman (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Yacare_CaimanYacare caiman are also known as the piranha caiman, owing to its habit of eating piranhas, they also eat aquatic snails, snakes and other fish. Yacare caiman construct mound nests into which the females lay their eggs during the rainy season.1Yellow-bellied glider (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Yellow-bellied_GliderYellow-bellied gliders are marsupials found only in eastern Austalia. They glide from tree to tree over distances of more than 100 metres. They depend on eucalyptus trees for food, biting into the trunks to extract the sap. Being nocturnal yellow-bellied gliders sleep in leaf-lined dens in hollow trees during the day.1Yellow meadow ant (video, facts and news)http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/species/Yellow_meadow_antYellow meadow ants live in grasslands and are good for the grass in many ways. Their underground colonies open up the soil and keep it porous, their droppings fertilize the roots of the grass, and the ants eat insects, some of which may damage the grass. The ants are also known for allowing the caterpillars of the chalk hill blue butterfly into their nest.1Science & Nature - Wildfactshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfactsanimals, search for animals, database, animals database, mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, fish, fishes, habitat, distribution, records, diet, conservation, find, fact files, factfiles, species, information, nature, wildlife, bbc1Nature - Wildfactshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/animals_a_z.shtml1Science & Nature - Wildfactshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/birds.shtmlanimals, search for animals, database, animals database, mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, fish, fishes, habitat, distribution, records, diet, conservation, find, fact files, factfiles, species, information, nature, wildlife, bbc1Asiatic black bear, Tibetan black bear, Himalayan black bear, moon bearhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/10.shtmlTheir ability to balance proficiently on their hind feet mean that they are sometimes trained as cubs to dance for human amusement.1Great sperm whalehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/103.shtmlThe star of Moby Dick, great sperm whales hold many records, including deepest diving mammal, largest toothed whale and biggest brain.1Lesser sperm whale, pygmy sperm whalehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/104.shtmlSmaller than its giant relative, lesser sperm whales are thought to have developed an unusual method of escaping predators. They are believed to produce a thick red/brown fluid when startled, which allows them to escape as the predator tries to see its way through the dense liquid. Squid use ink in the same way.1Dwarf sperm whalehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/105.shtmlThese are the smallest of all the whales. They are very similar in appearance to lesser sperm whales, except for the difference in size.1Shepherd's beaked whale, Tasman whalehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/106.shtmlUnlike most beaked whales, Shepherd's beaked whales feed on fish, and not squid.1Arnoux's beaked whale, Southern four-toothed whalehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/107.shtmlIt is possible that Arnoux's beaked whale is the same species as Baird's beaked whale, although the difference in their distribution and size is a strong counter-argument.1Baird's beaked, Northern four-toothed whale, giant bottle-nosed whalehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/108.shtmlBaird's beaked whales are thought to be the largest of the beaked whales.1Indo-Pacific beaked whale, Longman's beaked whalehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/109.shtmlMost of the information on these whales has been determined from only two skulls.1Sowerby's beaked whalehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/110.shtmlThis was the first of the beaked whales to be discovered, after an individual was found stranded in Scotland, 1800. English artist John Sowerby described it four years later, hence its name.1Andrew's beaked whale, splaytooth beaked whalehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/111.shtmlVery little information is known about Andrew's beaked whales, and most has been gleaned from about 20 strandings.1Hubb's beaked whale, arch-beaked whalehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/112.shtmlAs with most beaked whales, little is known about this species and it is rarely seen.1Blainville's beaked whalehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/113.shtmlBlainville's beaked whales are thought to have the widest distribution of all the beaked whales. They are also one of the commonest of the beaked whales, although they are still rarely sighted due to their preference for deep water.1Gervais' beaked whalehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/114.shtmlThe first recorded Gervais' beaked whale was found floating in the English Channel in the 1840s.1Gray's beaked whale, southern beaked whalehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/116.shtmlAs with most beaked whales, little is know about this species and it is rarely seen.1Hector's beaked whale, skew-beaked whalehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/117.shtmlHector's beaked whales are one of the smallest of the beaked whale family.1Strap-toothed whale, Layard's beaked whalehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/118.shtmlMale strap-toothed whales have two huge teeth growing out of their bottom jaw. These curl upwards and backwards, sometimes so much so that the whale can't open its beak properly.1True's beaked whalehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/119.shtmlThese whales are also known as 'wonderful beaked whales'. They have never positively been identified at sea.1Sun bear, Malay bear, honey bear, dog bearhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/12.shtmlDespite being the smallest of all the bears, the sun bear is probably the most aggressive, and will attack without provocation. Relatively, they also have the largest canines of all the bears, although their diet is less carnivorous than some of their cousins.1Stejneger's beaked whalehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/120.shtmlAs with most beaked whales, little is know about this species and they are rarely seen.1Cuvier's beaked whale, goose-beaked whalehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/121.shtmlTheir beak is shaped like that of a goose, hence their alternative name - goose-beaked whale. They are possibly the most abundant beaked whale.1Northern bottlenose whale, bottleheadhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/122.shtmlOne of the most curious of beaked whales, this species will often approach boats, making them easy to study, and in the past, easy to hunt.1Southern bottlenose whalehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/123.shtmlSouthern bottlenose whales have a wider distribution than their northern relatives.1Spectacled porpoisehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/124.shtmlThese are one of the largest of the porpoises. They are fast, active swimmers, and they normally avoid boats.1Harbour porpoise, common porpoisehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/125.shtmlDue to the noise they make when they spout, harbour porpoises are also known as 'puffing pigs'.1Gulf porpoise, vaquita, cochitohttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/126.shtmlAs well as having one of the smallest distributions of all marine cetaceans, they are also one of the smallest in size.1Burmeister's porpoise, black porpoisehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/127.shtmlThese are one of the commonest cetaceans around the coast of South America.1Dall's porpoise, white-flanked porpoisehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/128.shtmlDall's porpoises are the fastest porpoises, reaching speeds of 55km/h. They will regularly bow-ride, and send up a 'rooster-tail' of spray when they surface.1Finless porpoise, finless black porpoisehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/129.shtmlThese are the only porpoises to have a bulbous melon on their heads. As their name suggests, they are also unusual because they lack fins.1Sloth bearhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/13.shtmlThese shaggy-haired bears were originally classed as sloths. When feeding, they can be heard sucking up termites from many miles away.1Black-backed jackal, silver-backed jackalhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/131.shtmlThese nocturnal dogs tend to spend the day hidden in bush, emerging at dusk to hunt.1Side-striped jackalhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/132.shtmlJackals will often follow lions and other big cats to scavenge their kills.1Red wolfhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/134.shtmlThe red wolf has a much smaller distribution that its grey counterpart. There may be only 100 left in the wild and they are critically endangered.1Corsac foxhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/136.shtmlTogether with the Arctic fox, the corsac fox occupies a niche that is between the true dogs (Canis) and the foxes (Vulpes).1Kit foxhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/138.shtmlThese are the smallest of the American foxes, and are not much larger than a domestic cat.1Sand fox, Rueppell's fox, http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/140.shtmlThese small foxes emit a loud1Pale foxhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/141.shtmlThese small African foxes are poorly known.1Hoary fox, hoary zorrohttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/143.shtmlLittle is known about these South American foxes.1Fennec foxhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/146.shtmlFennec foxes are the smallest members of the dog family.1Wildfacts - Dingohttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/149.shtmlThey are thought to originate from Asian wolves, which arrived in Australia with Asian sailors 4,000 years ago. Today, because of interbreeding with domestic dogs, there are few pure dingoes left.1New Guinea singing doghttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/150.shtmlThey are named after their unique howls which have been described as sounding like bird calls or whale songs. They emit a number of other vocalisations including yelps, barks, screams and whines.1Coyote, prairie wolf, brush wolfhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/151.shtmlThe coyote is the star of many North American Indian stories, who believe it is the chief of the pre-human animal age.1Dhole, red dog, Asiatic wild dog, Indian wild doghttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/152.shtmlAlthough dholes are not fast runners, they have good stamina, and will pursue prey for hours until they finally succumb to exhaustion.1Bush dog, savannah doghttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/153.shtmlThis is a small and stocky dog that looks like a terrier. They are one of the most social canids.1Grey fox, tree foxhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/154.shtmlThese foxes are unusual in that they live in pairs rather than in a pack.1Raccoon doghttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/156.shtmlDespite being hunted in their thousands, a small island in Japan has been designated a protected area for raccoon dogs.1Small-eared dog, small-eared zorrohttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/158.shtmlThe male small-eared fox, though smaller than the female, is dominant. Both the male and the female move with a catlike agility.1Bat-eared foxhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/159.shtmlThe bat-eared fox is the only canid to have largely abandoned mammalian prey in favour of insects.1Gentoo penguinhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/161.shtmlGentoos are the fastest underwater swimming bird, reaching speeds of 36 km/h (22.3 mph).1Northern elephant sealhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/165.shtmlMale northern elephant seals are the second largest of all the pinnipeds (after the southern elephant seal). They were once at risk of becoming extinct, but happily their numbers are now much healthier.1Harp sealhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/166.shtmlThese seals are named after the harp-shaped markings on their back.1Australian sea lionhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/169.shtmlThis non-migratory species spends a lot of time on the beach. It moves relatively easily on the land, and may travel for a few kilometres on its flippers.1Steller's sea lion, Northern sea lionhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/171.shtmlThese are the largest of the sea lions and will sometimes kill other pinnipeds.1Northern fur sealhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/174.shtmlSeals, sea lions, fur seals and walruses are all classed as pinnipeds. The name is derived from the Latin for flap-footed and these marine mammals are thought to have derived from bear-like ancestors which entered the sea millions of years ago.1South American fur seal, Southern fur sealhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/175.shtmlThis species is extremely territorial during the breeding season. Males take up territories in November, which they defend rigorously, and are joined two weeks later by females.1Mediterranean monk sealhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/176.shtmlThere are three species of monk seal. The Hawaiian species is endangered, the Mediterranean species is critically endangered, but sadly it is too late for the Caribbean species, which has become extinct.1Bull shark, Ganges, Nicaragua, river, shovelnose, slipway, grey, square-nose, Van Rooyens, Zambezi sharkhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/181.shtmlIt is possible that this species is actually responsible for many of the attacks attributed to great whites. They are unusual in that they spend a lot of time in fresh water.1Oceanic whitetip sharkhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/182.shtmlOceanic whitetips are easily distinguished by their large, rounded fins, which are mottled on the edges with white.1Sand tiger, grey nurse shark, ragged-tooth sharkhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/183.shtmlTheir fearsome-looking teeth are an adaptation to gripping fish and other slippery prey.1Basking sharkhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/185.shtmlThe second largest fish in the world, like their larger counterpart - the whale shark - they feed on plankton.1Great hammerhead sharkhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/186.shtmlThe bizarre shape of the head is thought to make the shark more sensitive to electrical signals, which they use to detect hidden prey.1Blue sharkhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/187.shtmlBlue sharks are considered to be dangerous and are thought to be responsible for attacks on ship and air disaster victims.1Grey squirrelhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/190.shtmlGrey squirrels are an alien species and were introduced to the UK from the USA in the late nineteenth/early twentieth century. Their success has been to the detriment of our native red squirrels.1European molehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/194.shtmlMost of the 29 species of mole are adapted to an underground life, and the European mole is no exception.1Pine marten, baum marten, sweet martenhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/197.shtmlPine martens were once considered to be vermin and were persecuted throughout the 17th century. They were trapped for their fur and because of attacks on game birds and chickens. By the early 1900s, the pine marten was extinct throughout much of Britain.1Clouded leopardhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/20.shtmlRelative to body size, clouded leopards have the biggest canines of all the cats - they measure 3.8-4.5cm. It uses them to kill its prey, often only needing to use a single bite.1Roe deerhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/200.shtmlRoe deer became extinct in most of England during the 18th century, but they were reintroduced in the 19th century. Before 1960 they were treated as vermin due to the damage they cause to the forestry industry.1Weasel, least weaselhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/202.shtmlAlthough they look similar - one way to tell the difference between a stoat and a weasel is that unlike stoats, weasels do not have a black tip to the tail.1Little owlhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/204.shtmlLittle owls are the smallest British owl and are closely related to the American burrowing owl. They are an introduced species to the UK, but have been established for more than 100 years.1Long-eared owlhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/205.shtmlThe large ear tufts are not actually ears, they are simply feathers and have no connection with hearing.1White-tailed sea eagle, grey sea eaglehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/208.shtmlWhite-tailed sea eagles are the fourth largest eagles in the world.1Osprey, fish hawkhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/209.shtmlUnlike most UK birds of prey, ospreys have adapted to a diet of fish.1Wildfacts - Wildcathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/21.shtmlThe wildcat is the UK's only native feline species, and is also one of the ancestors of our pet cats.1Long-tailed macaque, crab-eating monkey, Java monkey, cynomolgus monkeyhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/210.shtmlLong-tailed macaques are among the most commonly used laboratory animal, second only to the rhesus monkey. They were used extensively in studies leading to the development of the polio vaccine.1Rhesus monkeyhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/211.shtmlThey have given their name to the rhesus antigens found in their blood in 1940, which has enabled doctors to determine different blood groups in humans. Rhesus monkeys were also the first primates to be rocketed into space.1Formosan rock macaque, Taiwan macaquehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/213.shtmlFormosan rock macaques are hunted for their meat and for the damage they do to crops.1Toque macaquehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/215.shtmlLike bonnet macaques, this species have a cap-like whorl of hair on their heads.1Assamese macaque, Assam macaque, Himalayan macaque, hill monkeyhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/216.shtmlLike most macaques, this species is highly social.1Tibetan stump-tailed macaque, Tibetan macaque, Pire David's macaque, short-tailed Tibetan macaquehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/217.shtmlDominant male Tibetan stump-tailed macaques are reported to have a favourite infant, which they groom. Subordinate males recognise this and carry the favourite infant to the dominant males in order to appease them.1Barbary ape, Barbary macaquehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/218.shtmlBarbary apes are the only non-human primate to live in Europe (Gibraltar). Despite their name, they are a monkey and not an ape.1Pig-tailed macaque http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/219.shtmlSemi-tamed pig-tailed macaques have been trained by locals to climb trees and throw down coconuts. This species is currently in demand for HIV research.1Chinese mountain cat, Chinese desert cathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/22.shtmlMountain cats were traditionally called desert cats. In 1992 experts recommended that their name be changed after it was found that they are rarely found in desert habitats.1Lion-tailed macaque, wanderoohttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/220.shtmlAs well as having a tail like a lion's, this species also has a mane. They are also known as wanderoos.1Crested black macaque, Celebes macaque, Gorontalo macaque, Sulawesi macaque, http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/221.shtmlLike most macaques, this species is highly social.1Celebes moor macaquehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/222.shtmlDue to their dog-like muzzles, macaques are sometimes known as dog-apes. This is a misnomer, as macaques are monkeys, and not apes.1Stump-tailed macaquehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/225.shtmlThis species is also known as the bear macaque.1Yellow baboonhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/227.shtmlThe resistance of baboons to HIV has led to several experiments in the search for a cure.1Guinea baboonhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/229.shtmlThis is the smallest of all the baboons.1Jungle cat, swamp cat, reed cathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/23.shtmlPossibly the only cat that barks, male jungle cats will also defend their kittens.1Chacma baboonhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/230.shtmlIn 1986, a troop of chacma baboons was found living in the heart of the Namib desert - the most arid environment known to be inhabited by a non-human primate (the annual rainfall is only 27mm). In 1992, the troop went without water for 116 days, eating figs for moisture.1Wildfacts - Drillhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/231.shtmlSadly, In Nigeria, hunters use dogs to pursue drills. They are considered good game as they stand their ground and several can be killed with shotguns before they will flee.1Wildfacts - Mandrillhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/232.shtmlMandrills are the most colourful mammals in the world. The skin colours brighten as the animal gets more excited.1Hen harrier, northern harrierhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/236.shtmlA harrier's face feathers are arranged into a disk. This helps the raptor to listen out for prey as the feathers form a groove, which direct sound waves to the ear opening.1Marsh harrierhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/237.shtmlHarriers are slow fliers and have the ability to remain airborne at speeds of less than 32 km/h (20 mph). Flying at such slow speeds makes it easier for them to detect prey.1Montagu's harrierhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/238.shtmlMontagu's harriers are scarce summer visitors to southern Britain.1Sand cat, sand dune cathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/24.shtmlLike some other desert animals, sand cats are capable of surviving without drinking - they obtain all the water they need through their food.1Common buzzard, Eurasian buzzardhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/241.shtmlIn recent years, the population of British buzzards has exploded with thriving populations now in peripheral areas where there were few, such as Cheshire, Northamptonshire and the Lothians.1Merlin, pigeon hawkhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/244.shtmlMerlins are the smallest European raptors.1Wildfacts - Hobbyhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/246.shtmlThese birds of prey are intermediate in size and strength between peregrine falcons and merlins.1Blue tithttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/248.shtmlA common species at bird-tables, these attractive little birds are found throughout Europe, Asia and north west Africa.1Great tithttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/249.shtmlGreat tits are distinguished from blue tits by their larger size and black cap.1Black-footed cat, small-spotted cathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/25.shtmlThese small, African cats are highly unsociable. Like desert cats, they do not need to drink water, and obtain sufficient moisture from their diet.1Wildfacts - Chaffinchhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/250.shtmlAs with many birds, recent studies have shown that their songs vary according to the region, a bit like a human accent.1Collared dovehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/251.shtmlChances are, if you are reading this in the British Isles, you are within a mile or less of a collared dove. Yet, just 40 years ago, the closest individual would have been no nearer than France, Holland or Denmark. Until 1953, the species had never even been seen in Britain.1House sparrowhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/252.shtmlHouse sparrows are decreasing alarmingly in Britain, with 64 per cent lost in the last 25 years.1Wood pigeon, ring dovehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/255.shtmlWood pigeon chicks are fed on crop milk, specially produced by the parents.1Wildfacts - Goldfinchhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/257.shtmlThe collective noun for this species is 'a charm of goldfinches'.1Song thrushhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/258.shtmlSong thrushes are famous for smashing open the shells of snails on a stone anvil to get to the flesh inside.1Pallas cat, manulhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/26.shtmlThese Asian cats have adapted to a life at high altitudes, with thick fur and low-set ears to protect against the cold.1Common shrewhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/260.shtmlWhen disturbed from the nest, young common shrews will sometimes follow their mother in a caravan fashion, using their mouths to hold on to the tail of the sibling in front. They are the second most common British mammal.1Pygmy shrew, lesser shrewhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/261.shtmlBritish shrews are protected by the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981, and it is an offence to kill them without a special licence.1Water shrewhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/262.shtmlStudies on water shrew have suggested that they may have venomous saliva, which serves to immobilise the prey. Bites to humans produces a burning pain that may last for a few days.1Wood mouse, long-tailed field mousehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/264.shtmlWood mice are one of the most common European small mammals.1Yellow-necked mousehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/265.shtmlAlthough not endangered worldwide, the status of yellow-necked mice in the UK is unclear.1Harvest mousehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/266.shtmlHarvest mice are the smallest British rodent. They are the only Old World mammals to have truly prehensile tails.1Fat dormouse, edible dormousehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/269.shtmlFat dormice were eaten by the Romans - hence their alternative name, edible dormice - who kept them in special jars to fatten them up for the table. They are the largest of the dormice.1Eurasian lynxhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/27.shtmlAs Europe's biggest cat and the largest of the lynx family, the Eurasian lynx holds many records. It also has one of the widest distribution of all the cats.1House mousehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/270.shtmlHouse mice originated in Asia but have since spread throughout the world. Along with brown rats, they are considered to be the most widespread terrestrial mammal other than humans.1Bank volehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/271.shtmlBank voles are widespread across mainland Britain, but are absent from some offshore islands.1Black rat, ship rat, roof rat, house rathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/272.shtmlAs their alternative name suggests, they were commonly found on ships, resulting in their distribution throughout the world.1Brown rat, Norway rat, common rathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/273.shtmlBrown rats have been bred for research and the pet trade. They spread across Britain via the shipping traffic from foreign countries in the 18th Century, largely replacing the black rat. Along with house mice, they are considered to be the most widespread terrestrial mammal.1Reeves' Muntjac deer, Chinese muntjac, barking deerhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/275.shtmlMuntjac deer were introduced to Woburn Park, Bedfordshire in the early 20th Century. Since then many escapees have reproduced and expanded their populations outwards. Muntjacs were also introduced to parks in Hertfordshire and Northamptonshire.1Fallow deerhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/276.shtmlFallow deer were introduced to British parks and forests by the Normans in the eleventh century and have since become the most widespread species of deer in Britain.1Adder, common viperhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/279.shtmlAdders are the most northerly distributed snake - they are the only species found inside the Arctic circle. They are also Britain's only venomous reptile.1Canada lynx, American lynxhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/28.shtmlDue to its snowy habitat, the Canada lynx has adapted by growing a thick coat and snowshoes.1Smooth snakehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/280.shtmlSmooth snakes are constrictors - they wrap their coils tightly around their prey and then swallow them live and whole. They are non-venomous and harmless to humans.1Common lizard, viviparous lizardhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/282.shtmlCommon lizards have the ability to shed their tails in order to fool predators when threatened.1Sand lizardhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/283.shtmlMale sand lizards fight vigorously for females. They grab the neck of their opponent with their jaws and then roll over and over each other, until one, usually the smaller lizard, retreats.1Greater horseshoe bathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/284.shtmlHorseshoe bats have a horseshoe-shaped fleshy structure called a nose-leaf surrounding the nose, which amplifies the ultrasonic calls that the bat emits when searching for food.1Lesser horseshoe bathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/285.shtmlHorseshoe bats have a horseshoe-shaped fleshy structure called a nose-leaf surrounding the nose, which amplifies the ultrasonic calls that the bat emits when searching for food.1Daubenton's bat, water bathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/286.shtmlDaubenton's bats leave their roosts to hunt at twilight, and they are fast agile fliers.1Whiskered bathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/288.shtmlBats' wings are adapted hands, with skin stretching between elongated fingers.1Natterer's bathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/289.shtmlNatterer's bats have pinkish limbs, giving rise to its old name of 'red-armed bat'.1Spanish lynx, Iberian lynx, pardel lynxhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/29.shtmlThe Spanish lynx is considered to be the most endangered feline in the world. Hopes are that it will not become the first extinction of a wild cat species for at least 2,000 years.1Nathusius's pipistrelle http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/292.shtmlNathusius's pipistrelles are similar in appearance to common pipistrelles, but they are slightly larger with longer fur.1Serotine bathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/293.shtmlSerotine bats are one of the largest British species, and are one of the first to emerge in the evening.1Noctule bathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/294.shtmlAlong with serotine bats, noctules are one of the largest British species, and are one of the first to emerge in the evening.1Leisler's bat, lesser noctulehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/295.shtmlLeisler's bats were formerly known as hairy-armed bats, due to the long hair around the back and shoulders.1Barbastelle bathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/296.shtmlThe use of insecticides, which affect their prey availability, may be a reason for the decline of barbastelle bats.1Brown long-eared bathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/297.shtmlAs their name suggests, long-eared bats have strikingly large ears, which are three quarters the length of the head and body. When resting, the ears are folded and held backwards.1Grey long-eared bathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/298.shtmlAs their name suggests, long-eared bats have strikingly large ears, which are three quarters the length of the head and body. When resting, the ears are folded and held backwards.1Bobcat, red lynx, bay lynxhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/30.shtmlThis member of the lynx family owes its name to its characteristic stumpy tail.1Columbian mammothhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3000.shtmlThe extinct Columbian mammoth was one of the largest elephants to have walked the Earth. It had impressive, spiralled tusks which measured up to 4.9m (16ft) long, making them world record holders amongst the elephant family.1California condorhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3001.shtmlThe California condor is North America?s largest bird of prey and also one of its rarest, with only a handful of birds living wild in California and Arizona.1Giant ground slothhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3002.shtmlThe most spectacular of the four North American ground sloths. This huge animal weighed as much as a mammoth, could rear up as high as a giraffe and had claws the size of a man?s forearm1American mastodonhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3004.shtmlThe elephant-like American mastodon was a distant relative of the woolly mammoth with which it shared its ice age home in North America.1Wildfacts - Glyptodonthttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3005.shtmlThe glyptodonts were quite unlike any other animal to roam the planet. Growing to the size of a small car and weighing over 1000kg they were covered in an impenetrable armour up to 5cm thick.1Sabre-tooth cathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3007.shtmlOne of the best known of all the extinct ice age animals, the powerfully built sabre-tooth cat was equipped with lethal knife-like canine teeth. The sabre-tooth used these to inflict fatal wounds on mammalian prey such as bison and sheep.1American scimitarhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3009.shtmlThe scimitar cat is the lesser known of the two ?sabre-toothed? cats of ice age North America. This extinct cat was a formidable hunter and evidence suggests it was the major predator of mammoths during its time.1Shasta ground slothhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3010.shtmlThe extinct Shasta ground sloth was a bizarre looking, cow-sized herbivore, which inhabited the south-western parts of ice age North America.1Giant short-faced bearhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3011.shtmlThe giant short-faced bear was the biggest bear ever to have lived. Standing a 1.5 metres at the shoulder and equipped with powerful jaws this bear would have been an intimidating sight.1Spotted hyenahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3012.shtmlHyenas have a bad reputation as cowardly scavengers, but they are actually highly interesting and intelligent animals.1Woolly opossumhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3013.shtmlThere are three species of woolly opossum. These strange-looking little animals with pointed noses and forward-facing bulging eyes, spend their days climbing through treetops in search of fruit and hanging from their long prehensile tails.1Abert's squirrel, tassel-eared squirrelhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3014.shtmlA North American tree squirrel that rarely comes down from the canopy.1Central American agoutihttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3015.shtmlThese nimble rodents are important seed dispersers for many species of trees.1Wildfacts - Blackbuckhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3017.shtmlA stocky gazelle from India in which males are a distinctive black and white and have long twisted horns, while females are fawn coloured with no horns.1Grant's gazellehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3018.shtmlA large and heavily built gazelle living in arid areas of east Africa.1Cape hyrax, Dassiehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3022.shtmlA small African mammal which looks like a rodent, but is actually a member of the Afrotheria - related to elephants, sea cows, tenrecs, elephant shrews and the aardvark.1Canada goosehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3023.shtmlCanada geese were first introduced to the UK in 1665, as an addition to the waterfowl collection of King Charles II at St. James? Park.1Coot, Eurasian coot,http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3024.shtmlCoots are related to moorhens, but they do not compete for food and are often found in the same habitat.1Grey heronhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3025.shtmlThese large and striking birds can be spotted standing motionless at the water's edge, waiting patiently for prey.1House martinhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3026.shtmlHouse martins are a familiar sight in villages and towns, building their cup-shaped nests on the side of buildings.1Wildfacts - Mallardhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3028.shtmlMallards are the most familiar of all ducks and are the ancestor of the domestic duck.1Mute swanhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3029.shtmlMute swans are one of Britain's largest and heaviest birds.1Emperor tamarinhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/303.shtmlEmperor tamarins are thought to have been named after the Emperor of Germany, Emperor Wilhelm II, due to their long, white moustaches.1Feral pigeonhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3030.shtmlPigeons are actually domesticated rock doves that have returned to wild or semi-wild conditions. Some rock doves were domesticated for food, others as homing pigeons, and some as ?fancy? pigeons, bred for their plumage.1Common swifthttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3032.shtmlSwifts are accomplished fliers, spending most of their life in the air.1Giant ichneumon fly/wasp, sabre wasphttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3033.shtmlThis parasitic species is the largest ichneumon fly in Britain, and one of the largest in Europe.1Dromedary camel, Arabian camel, one-humped camelhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3036.shtmlAbout 90 per cent of the world's 14 million camels are dromedaries.1Aurochs, wild ox, wild cattle, giant oxhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3037.shtmlThe aurochs was the ancestor of the European breeds of domestic cattle.1Cave bearhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3038.shtmlCave bears are known from tens of thousands of skeletons and the paintings that Ice Age people made on cave walls.1Red-tailed black cockatoohttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3039.shtmlThe red-tailed black cockatoo can be found in flocks of over 1000.1Wildfacts - Diprotodonhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3040.shtmlDiprotodon was the largest marsupial that ever lived.1Frilled lizard, frillneck lizard, King?s lizardhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3041.shtmlThe flashy frill and menacing hiss of the frilled lizard may look frightening, but it is all a big bluff.1Black flying fox, Gould?s fruit bat, black fruit bat, blackish fruit bathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3042.shtmlThe black flying fox - in common with the other fruit bats - lacks the ability to echolocate.1Wildfacts - Genyornishttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3043.shtmlGenyornis and its relatives have been nick-named the 'demon ducks'.1Haast?s eagle, New Zealand giant eaglehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3044.shtmlHaast?s eagle was the largest eagle ever to have lived and is the only eagle in the world ever to have been top predator of its ecosystem.1Megalania, giant ripper lizardhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3046.shtmlWhen the first people reached Australia, they encountered the largest lizard that had ever lived.1Wildfacts - Moahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3047.shtmlDinornis giganteus was one of the largest of the moa - flightless birds related to the ostriches and emus. It became extinct when people discovered and colonised New Zealand in the 13th century.1Polynesian rat, Pacific rat, Maori rat, kiorehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3049.shtmlThe Polynesian rat is known as the Kiore in New Zealand, where it is an important cultural animal to the Maori people.1Estuarine crocodile, saltwater crocodilehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3050.shtmlThe estuarine crocodile is the world?s largest living croc.1Steppe bisonhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3051.shtmlThe steppe bison is portrayed in Ice Age cave paintings.1Wildfacts - Tuatarahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3052.shtmlOften referred to as 'living fossils' because they are the only surviving members of the rhynchocephalid reptiles, tuataras are in fact very advanced.1Western camelhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3053.shtmlThe western camel was hunted by the ancestors of the Native Americans.1Western horse, western quaggahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3054.shtmlThe western horse inhabited North America during the Ice Age.1Middle Island tusked wetahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3056.shtmlWetas are living fossils, showing little or no change in body shape for millions of years.1Wildfacts - Nuthatchhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3059.shtmlThis is the only species of nuthatch in the UK. Unlike woodpeckers and treecreepers, they descend tree trunks headfirst.1Dusky titi monkey, red titi monkeyhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/306.shtmlDusky titi monkeys live in pairs. The bond between the male and female is very strong, and when they have been separated in captivity, they both become highly stressed.1Coal tithttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3060.shtmlCoal tits will repeatedly take nuts and seeds from bird tables and cache them for later consumption.1Hummingbird hawk-mothhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3063.shtmlThe moth is named after its resemblance to a hummingbird, with its rapid hovering motion as it feeds on the nectar of flowers.1Florida manateehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3064.shtmlA large, aquatic relative of the elephant that grazes underwater vegetation around the coasts of Florida, the Caribbean and South America.1Red-backed squirrel monkey, black crowned Central American squirrel monkey, http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/307.shtmlThere are two species of squirrel monkey (the other being the common squirrel monkey) and they are the commonest primates in the forests of Central America.1Long-beaked echidna, long-nosed echidna, long-nosed spiny anteater, New Guinea long-nosed echidnahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3070.shtmlAlong with platypuses, echidnas are the only egg-laying mammals.1Greater bilby, dalgyte, rabbit-eared bandicoot, ninu, walpajirri.http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3071.shtmlGreater bilbies are small marsupials that inhabit arid areas of West and Central Australia.1Southern cassowary, double-wattled cassowary,http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3072.shtmlCassowaries are large, flightless birds that are closely related to emus. They share many characteristics with rheas and ostriches too.1Gilbert's potoroohttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3075.shtmlThe only known area where Gilbert's potoroos live today is on the South Coast of Western Australia.1Night parrot, spinifex parrot, porcupine parrothttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3076.shtmlThe night parrot is one of Australia's most intriguing birds and possibly its least known.1Rainbow lorikeethttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3077.shtmlIn Australia, these common and brightly-coloured parrots can cause damage in orchards and vineyards.1Sulphur-crested cockatoohttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3078.shtmlThis parrot is popular as a pet, and the capture of adults and chicks is posing a threat to some populations.1Common tube-nosed bathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3080.shtmlCommon tube-nosed bats are a type of flying fox or fruit bat.1Guatemalan howler monkeyhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/309.shtmlHowler monkeys are the largest New World monkeys. They howl extremely loudly to advertise their presence in their territory.1Communal spider, social spider, colonial spiderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3090.shtmlMost spiders are anti-social creatures, happiest when left alone to hunt; but these spiders live in communes of up to 1500 individuals, catching prey and sharing it like lions at a kill.1Caracal, African lynx, Asian caracal, desert lynxhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/31.shtmlAs with cheetahs, caracals are easily tamed and have been used to assist humans on hunts in Iran and India.1Black-handed spider monkeyhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/310.shtmlSpider monkeys are so named because of their long, spidery limbs. Their prehensile tail acts like a fifth limb when swinging through the canopy.1Augur buzzardhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3102.shtmlIn most of its range the Augur buzzard is by far the commonest and most obvious buzzard.1Mona monkeyhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/311.shtmlThere is an introduced population of mona monkeys on the island of Grenada in the Caribbean.1White-eared kobhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/3114.shtmlSearching for new pastures, the 1500km migration of up to a million white-eared kob in southern Sudan each year rivals that of the great herds of the Serengeti in east Africa.1Diana monkeyhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/312.shtmlThese monkeys are named after the goddess Diana because the white stripe across their forehead was thought to be the same shape as her bow.1De Brazza's monkeyhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/313.shtmlThey take their name from Brazza, a French Explorer who founded the city of Brazzaville and the French Congo.1Red-tailed guenon, coppertail monkeyhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/314.shtmlThere are about 20 species of guenons, and they are all found in Africa.1Sun-tailed guenonhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/315.shtmlThis species wasn't described until 1988.1Patas monkeyhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/316.shtmlPatas monkeys are quadrupedal and are considered to be the fastest primate, running at speeds of 55km/hr.1Kirk's red colobushttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/317.shtmlKirk's red colobus is sometimes considered to be a subspecies of Pennant's red colobus, which would make its scientific name <I>Procolobus pennantii kirkii</I>.1Geoffroy's black and white colobushttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/318.shtmlColobus monkeys have vestigial or absent thumbs, and have complex stomachs to help them adapt to a vegetarian diet.1Proboscis monkey, long-nosed monkeyhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/319.shtmlProboscis monkeys have the longest noses of all primates. In elderly animals, it can reach 17.5cm (a quarter of the body length) Although its function is not known for sure, it is likely to be a visual signal used in mate choice. The male vocalises through the nose with a <i>kee honk</i> sound.1Silvered langurhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/320.shtmlLangurs are also known as leaf monkeys due to their vegetarian diet. They also have large and complex stomachs to help them digest cellulose.1Hanuman langur, common langur, grey langur, entellus langur, true langurhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/321.shtmlThese langurs are named after the Hindu monkey-god Hanuman, and are the sacred monkey of India.1Douc langur, red-shanked douc langurhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/322.shtmlThese langurs live in the forests of Asia, but are at risk of becoming extinct.1Golden langur, golden leaf monkeyhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/323.shtmlLangurs are also known as leaf monkeys due to their vegetarian diet. They also have large and complex stomachs to help them digest cellulose.1Grey mouse lemurhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/324.shtmlGrey mouse lemurs store fat in their tails and although they become less active in the winter, they do not hibernate.1Fat-tailed dwarf lemurhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/325.shtmlFat-tailed dwarf lemurs hibernate during the cool, dry season, surviving on the fat stored in their tail.1Pygmy mouse lemur, western rufous lemurhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/326.shtmlPygmy mouse lemurs are the world's smallest primate.1Thick-tailed greater bush baby, greater galagohttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/328.shtmlThick-tailed greater bush-babies are the largest of the bush babies. Like other bush babies, they makes a call that sounds like a human child crying.1Southern lesser bush baby, South African galagohttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/329.shtmlBush babies have a call which sounds like a human child crying, hence their name.1Marbled cathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/33.shtmlLittle is known about these nocturnal cats, although they are thought to be territorial.1Slow lorishttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/330.shtmlSlow lorises may not be swift, but they are accomplished climbers and are able to hang from branches by their feet alone.1Black lemurhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/333.shtmlLike all lemurs, this species is only found in Madagascar.1Greater bamboo lemur, broad-nosed gentle lemurhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/336.shtmlLike pandas, most of their diet consists of bamboo.1Lesser bamboo lemur, grey gentle lemurhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/337.shtmlThe small, tawny-coloured bandro lives exclusively in the reed and papyrus beds on Lake Alaotra, Madagascar.1Brown lemurhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/339.shtmlBefore eating millipedes, brown lemurs salivate on them and roll them in their hands for a few minutes, possibly because some species are poisonous.1Bay cat, Bornean red cat, Bornean marbled cathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/34.shtmlBay cats are one of the rarest cats species in the world. Descriptions of these animals are based on museum specimens and there is very little information on live animals.1Pygmy marmosethttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/341.shtmlPygmy marmosets are the smallest marmosets and one of the smallest of all primates.1Red-bellied tamarin, white-lipped tamarinhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/342.shtmlAs with most marmosets and tamarins, the male helps the female to rear the young. This is probably because both parents are needed to carry the young.1Eastern black and white colobus, Abyssinian colobushttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/345.shtmlThis species of colobus has been hunted for their pelts, which were sold to tourists as wall decorations.1Garden spider, cross spiderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/347.shtmlThe garden spider is the best known orb-weaving spider in the UK.1House spiderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/348.shtmlThis species of spider is found in houses all over the world.1Asian golden cat, Temminck's golden cathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/35.shtmlUnusually, these cats often hunt in pairs and the males are thought to play an active role in rearing the young.1Zebra spiderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/350.shtmlZebra spiders belong to the family Salticidae (also known as jumping spiders) who are believed to have the best eyesight of any arthropod. If you take a close look at one of these spiders it will often turn its head to look straight back at you.1Nursery web spiderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/351.shtmlIn June and July, female nursery web spiders can be seen carrying their egg sacs in their jaws.1Woodlouse spiderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/353.shtmlThis is one of the few species in the UK that can bite humans. Although their venom is not dangerous to us, their bite can be painful due to the strength of their jaws and some people may have an allergic reaction to the venom. However, they are unlikely to bite.1Spitting spiderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/354.shtmlSpitting spiders were possibly introduced from the tropics. They immobilise prey by spitting at it.1Wolf spiderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/355.shtmlWolf spiders are often seen in large numbers and it was once thought that they hunted in packs - which is why they are named after the predatory wolf.1Long-jawed orb weaverhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/356.shtmlLong-jawed orb-weavers are able to walk across the surface of water. In fact, they are much faster on water than they are on land.1Mothercare spiderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/357.shtmlMothercare spiders are one of the few spiders that look after their young after they hatch.1Wasp spiderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/358.shtmlIt is thought that this species was introduced to this country from continental Europe. Its population was previously confined to the south coast but it seems to be spreading northwards. It has been recorded in this country since 1922 but it may have been here longer.1Tube web spiderhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/359.shtmlIf you see a tube web you can entice the spider to reveal itself by gently touching the radiating trip-lines with a small stick or piece of grass. This will only work in the evening or at night as the spider is nocturnal.1African golden cat, African tigercathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/36.shtmlLittle is known about these nocturnal cats, although they are thought to have only one kitten.1Wildfacts - Wrenhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/362.shtmlTheir scientific name 'Troglodytes' means cave-dweller, after their preference for cave-like places. These little birds are nicknamed Jenny Wrens.1Galapagos penguinhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/364.shtmlWhen on land, Galapagos penguins hold their flippers out to maximise heat loss and to shade their feet from getting sunburnt.1Rockhopper penguinhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/365.shtmlRockhoppers use species specific mating calls called 'ecstatic vocalisation' to attract their mate from previous years.1Little penguin, fairy penguin, little blue penguinhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/369.shtmlThese Australasian penguins are the smallest of the family.1Leopard cathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/37.shtmlAlthough considerably smaller than their namesakes, leopard cats are equally secretive and elusive.1Erect-crested penguinhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/370.shtmlErect-crested penguins breed in large colonies on bare exposed rocks of the Bounty Islands and the tussock-clad beaches of the Antipode Islands.1Fiordland penguinhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/372.shtmlThe name penguin probably derived from the Latin word 'pinguis' or the Spanish 'pinguigo', which refers to the large quantity of fat on the birds.1Yellow-eyed penguinhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/373.shtmlYellow-eyed penguins normally dive to about 35m but sometimes as deep as 100m.1Royal penguinhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/376.shtmlRoyal penguins can be confused with macaroni penguins, as both have black and yellow crests on their head. One way to spot the difference is that macaronis have black chins and royals have white chins.1Rusty-spotted cathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/38.shtmlWeighing a maximum of only 1.6kg, the rusty-spotted cat is the smallest member of the cat family.1Fishing cathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/39.shtmlThese cats are good swimmers and will even dive underwater in search of fish.1Cane toad, giant American toad, marine toadhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/392.shtmlWhile other frogs and toads are becoming endangered, the cane toad has been very successful. Its density is higher in Australia than in its native home.1Sika deer http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/393.shtmlSika deer were introduced to parks in the UK in 1860, but escapees have established themseleves in our countryside.1Soprano pipistrellehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/394.shtmlScientists have recently recognised the soprano pipistrelle as a separate species. It can only be reliably told apart from the common pipistrelle by its echolocation call, which is on 55 kHz rather than 45 kHz.1Brimstone butterfly, yellow-bird butterfly http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/397.shtmlThese bright yellow butterflies are often the first butterflies to be seen in spring.1Cabbage white butterfly, small white butterfly http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/398.shtmlThese butterflies can be seen flying in gardens from July to September. Their small green caterpillars are notorious for their preference of cabbages and their relatives.1Comma butterflyhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/399.shtmlThe edges of this butterfly's wings are ragged in appearance. On the underside of the wing is a small white mark in the shape of a comma.1Flat-headed cathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/40.shtmlPerhaps this cat should have been named the fishing-cat, as it is an expert fisher. Its paws are also webbed - an adaptation to swimming.1Grayling butterfly http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/400.shtmlThe grayling is a common heathland butterfly.1Holly blue butterfly http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/401.shtmlThe caterpillars of this small blue butterfly feed on holly and ivy.1Meadow brown butterfly http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/402.shtmlMeadow browns are common almost everywhere in the UK and are found in fields, roadsides and woodland margins.1Mountain ringlet butterfly http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/403.shtmlThis species is rare in the UK and is restricted to mountainous areas.1Peacock butterfly http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/404.shtmlThese butterflies get their name from the large and colourful eyespots on their wings, which resemble those on the tail of the peacock.1Red admiral butterfly http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/406.shtmlA very attractive red and black butterfly that is a common visitor to garden flowers.1Small skipper butterfly http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/407.shtmlA small furry orange coloured butterfly with short wings which are held partially closed when the butterfly is at rest.1Small tortoiseshell butterfly http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/408.shtmlA small and attractive butterfly often seen in gardens, especially feeding on buddleia.1Speckled wood butterfly http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/409.shtmlThis brown woodland butterfly does not feed from flowers but can instead be seen feeding on the honeydew secreted by aphids.1Iriomote cathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/41.shtmlOnly recently discovered, these cats have one of the most restricted distribution of all cats, and there are possibly only sixty left.1Swallowtail butterfly http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/410.shtmlThe swallowtail is Britain's largest butterfly and also one of its most beautiful.1Two-spot ladybird http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/411.shtmlThe two-spot ladybird is very common and has very similar habits to the seven-spot ladybird.1Seven-spot ladybird http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/412.shtmlThe ladybird's bright colours are a warning to predators of its foul taste. When disturbed the ladybird will secrete small amounts of its oily foul-smelling yellow blood from its legs as a further warning to predators such as ants or birds.1Azure damselfly http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/413.shtmlDamselflies are smaller than dragonflies and hold their wings together behind the abdomen rather than out sideways.1Common centipede http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/414.shtmlThough the name1Common snail, garden snailhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/415.shtmlBecause of their moist skin, common snails are most active in damp weather and at night.1Common earthworm http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/416.shtmlEarthworms help to fertilise the soil by bringing nutrients closer to the surface.1Common shrimp, European brown shrimp http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/417.shtml'Crangon' is Greek for shrimp.1Common starfishhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/418.shtmlStarfish have the ability to push their stomachs out of their mouths in order to digest prey too big to swallow.1Pampas Cat, Chilean pampas cat, grass cathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/42.shtmlLittle is known about these small South American cats, and the subspecies vary considerably from each other.1Southern hawker http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/420.shtmlDragonflies can be seen on warm still days flying around at high speed catching insects in mid air.1Common earwig http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/421.shtmlDespite its name and threatening appearance, the common earwig is a harmless and interesting creature.1Freshwater mussel, river mussel http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/422.shtmlThis freshwater species is common in canals.1Great pond snail http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/424.shtmlThe shell of a great pond snail can grow up to 60mm high.1Honey beehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/425.shtmlHoney bees have been introduced to nearly all parts of the world by humans. It is thought that the species originated in India. <I>Mellifera</I> means 'honey bearing'.1Pond skater, common water-strider http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/426.shtmlPond skaters float on the surface of water sensing vibrations and ripples with the sensitive hairs on their legs and bodies.1Water boatman, common backswimmer http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/428.shtmlThis insect swims upside-down, propelled by two long legs which paddle like oars, making it look like a rowing boat.1Water spider http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/429.shtmlThis spider builds a silken retreat under water among plants which it fills with air. It is a good swimmer and will catch its aquatic prey and subdue it with its venomous jaws.1Wildfacts - Ocelothttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/43.shtmlThe ocelot's attractive coat once made it a prime target of the fur trade.1Leptictidium http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/431.shtmlThis extinct species of mammal lived alongside the dinosaurs, but died out when the tropical forests opened up.1Ambulocetus http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/432.shtmlAlthough Ambulocetus looked like a furry crocodile or a giant otter, it was actually an early whale.1Godinotia http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/433.shtmlThis extinct species is one of the earliest known primates.1Propalaeotherium http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/434.shtmlPropalaeotherium was one of the earliest horses, and certainly one of the best known.1Gastornis http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/435.shtmlThis fearsome bird is thought to be one of the descendants of the dinosaurs.1Giant anthttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/436.shtmlAs their name suggests, these ants were huge. Working as a team, they devoured everything in their path.1Basilosaurus http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/437.shtmlAn early whale, Basilosaurus is a relative of (but not an ancestor to) modern ceteaceans.1Andrewsarchus http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/439.shtmlAndrewsarchus was the largest carnivorous land mammal ever.1Apidium http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/441.shtmlApidium, now extinct, was one of the earliest mammals known.1Moeritherium http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/442.shtmlAlthough a member of the elephant family, this species adopted a lifestyle closer to that of hippos.1Hyaenodon http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/443.shtmlThis is the largest member of a group of very successful and intimidating predators.1Indricothere http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/444.shtmlThese extinct relatives of the rhino were the largest land mammals ever.1Bear-dog, Amphicyonid http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/446.shtmlBear-dogs were neither bears nor dogs, but a group of their own related to both.1Entelodont http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/447.shtmlThese extinct relatives of modern pigs were common in Mongolia.1Chalicothere http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/449.shtmlChalicotheres were related to the horses and tapirs, and evolved in the mid Eocene from small, forest-living animals rather like the early horses.1Little spotted cat, oncilla, little tiger cathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/45.shtmlAs little is known about this cat, it is difficult to know what threats they face, but their numbers have suffered at the hands of the fur trade.1Ancylotherium http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/451.shtmlAncylotherium was one of the last surviving chalicotheres and was not a knuckle-walker.1Australopithecus http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/452.shtmlAbout 5-6 million years ago there were tree-living apes that gave rise to two major groups of animals. One group remained in the forests and is represented today by living chimps and gorillas, and the other lived more on the edges of the forest and gave rise to the hominids, today represented only by humans.1Deinotherium http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/453.shtmlDeinotheres are extinct, but are in the same group as modern elephants.1Macrauchenia http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/455.shtmlAlthough this animal looked like it should be a member of the camel family, it was actually related to a group of animals that no longer exists.1Megatherium http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/456.shtmlWeighing almost a much as an elephant, Megatherium must have been one of the most impressive animals to walk the Earth.1Doedicurus http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/457.shtmlLike Megatherium, Doedicurus was related to sloths and armadillos.1Woolly mammothhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/458.shtmlMammoths were closely related to modern day elephants.1Neanderthal http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/459.shtmlDebate still rages over the relationship between Neanderthals and modern day humans.1Modern humans, Cro Magnon http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/460.shtmlModern humans were first discovered in Europe 40,000 years ago.1Megaloceros, Irish elk, Giant deerhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/461.shtmlMegaloceros is often confusingly called the Irish Elk, although it was found all across Europe, not just Ireland, and is technically a deer rather than an elk.1Woolly rhinohttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/462.shtmlThe woolly rhino was a member of an ancient group dating back 40 million years, which also includes today's critically endangered Sumatran rhino that also has reddish hair.1Kodkod, Chilean cathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/47.shtmlKodkods are particularly at risk of habitat loss as they have a restricted distribution.1Phorusrhacos http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/475.shtmlThis species belonged to a group called the terror birds.1Tokay geckohttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/476.shtmlTokay geckos are commonly offered as pets - but their fierce bite makes them a potentially painful companion. Most captive tokays have been wild caught.1Smooth newt, common newt http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/479.shtmlA characteristic popping sound often accompanies a smooth newt rising for air.1Mountain cat, Andean cathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/48.shtmlMountain cats have possibly specialised to hunt chinchillas, which have been hunted by humans to low numbers.1Palmate newt http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/480.shtmlIt is said that the name ?palmate? newt is derived from of the appearance of the newt?s feet, the skin between its toes looking like the palm of a hand.1Natterjack toad http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/482.shtmlNatterjacks are claimed to be Europe's noisiest amphibian, the call of the male being audible over several kilometres.1Common frog, grass frog http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/483.shtmlThe common frog can breathe through its skin. This enables it to hibernate for several months beneath piles of mud and decaying leaves underwater.1Jaguarundi, otter cat, eyra cathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/49.shtmlWith its long, slender body and short legs, the jaguarundi looks more like a weasel or otter than a member of the cat family.1Dung beetlehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/498.shtmlAncient Egyptians revered the scarab (dung beetle). They credited it with keeping the earth revolving like a giant ball of dung. Much earlier than the Egyptians, 10, 000 to 20, 000 years ago, dung beetles were revered by Shamanic cultures, often as The Creator.1Bowhead, Greenland right whalehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/51.shtmlFemale bowheads are perhaps the most flirtatious ocean mammal, and constantly tease the males into a frenzy.1Northern right whalehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/52.shtmlRight whales are named as such because whalers considered them the right whales to hunt.1Southern right whalehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/53.shtmlRight whales are named as such because whalers considered them the right whales to hunt.1Pygmy right whalehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/54.shtmlRight whales are named as such because whalers considered them the right whales to hunt.1Fin whale, common rorqualhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/56.shtmlFin whales are the second largest animal in the world - only blue whales are larger.1Minke whale, lesser rorqualhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/58.shtmlThe smallest of the rorqual family, minke whales are currently the only whales still openly being commercially hunted.1Sei whalehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/59.shtmlThe sei whale's streamlined shape makes it a very fast swimmer, reaching speeds of 50 km/h (26 mph).1Nine-banded armadillo, common long-nosed armadillohttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/590.shtmlOne of the more common armadillos which digs for ants and other invertebrates with its strong limbs and claws. It always gives birth to identical quadruplets.1Desert kangaroo rathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/592.shtmlA small, hopping rodent which lives in the desert, coming out at night to search for seeds which it carries in its cheek pouches.1Alpine marmothttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/593.shtmlA large, ground-living member of the squirrel family. Alpine marmots live in social groups in burrow systems on many European mountain ranges.1Wildfacts - Pronghornhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/595.shtmlThe only surviving species of a North American family resembling African gazelles, the pronghorn is a very fast runner with huge amounts of stamina and a curiosity that almost led to its extinction.1American martenhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/596.shtmlAn agile tree-living member of the weasel family that hunts for small mammals and birds among the conifer forests of North America.1Wildfacts - Babirusahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/597.shtmlThe babirusa is a bizarre-looking pig from Indonesia. The males have extraordinary tusks which develop from their canine teeth, growing up through the skull and growing in a curve until it pierces the skull again between the eyes.1Pyrenean desmanhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/599.shtmlThe Pyrenean desman is a relative of the mole and is a strong swimmer, catching insect larvae and shrimps by using its extremely sensitive nose.1Bryde's whale, tropical whalehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/60.shtmlLittle is known about Bryde's whales and they are often confused with sei whales.1Ringed sealhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/601.shtmlRinged seals are small seals living in the northern hemisphere. They are especially adapted to live and breed in the arctic ice, building ice caves above their breathing holes to protect the pups from predators such as polar bears.1Hooded sealhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/602.shtmlAn arctic seal in which males have a bizarre inflatable 'hood' on their heads, and can also inflate their nasal cavity out through their nostrils like a red balloon.1Wildfacts - Fossahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/603.shtmlMadagascar's largest carnivore, the fossa is an unusual member of the civet family. It hunts lemurs in trees at night and has a strange courtship and breeding system.1Coiban agoutihttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/605.shtmlA mid-sized rodent which lives in pairs and runs on the forest floor looking for fallen fruit during the day.1Belding's ground squirrelhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/606.shtmlA small ground squirrel that spends half the year hibernating underground and the other half feeding on grasses and seeds.1African porcupine, North African crested porcupinehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/607.shtmlA large, ground-living nocturnal rodent covered in long spines or quills and living in family groups in complex burrow systems.1Pale-throated three-toed slothhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/608.shtmlA slow-moving animal that hangs upside-down from tree branches in the forests of South America, eating leaves.1Brazilian tapirhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/609.shtmlA large Amazonian animal, related to rhinos, with a fleshy nose.1North American pikahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/610.shtmlA small member of the rabbit family with short legs and soft, silky fur. North American pikas have individual territories on the rocky mountains of North America and spend much of the summer gathering hay for the winter.1Naked mole-rathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/614.shtmlA rodent which lives in colonies underground, digging with its enlarged front teeth. Only one female in a colony breed, and her offspring become workers or soldiers, helping dig the burrows in search of tubers underground.1North American beaver, Canadian beaverhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/615.shtmlA large herbivorous rodent adapted for swimming with webbed feet and a scaly paddle-like tail. It lives in family groups and alters the flow of water in its range by digging canals and building dams.1Scimitar-horned oryx, Sahara oryxhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/616.shtmlOnce numerous around the Sahara desert, this pale horse-like antelope with a reddish chest and curved horns was nearly hunted to extinction.1Wildfacts - Gemsbokhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/617.shtmlAn elegant horse-like antelope, found in Africa.1Arabian oryxhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/618.shtmlOnce extinct in the wild, this species is a reintroduction programme's success story.1African pygmy squirrelhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/619.shtmlThe smallest species of squirrel.1Amazon river dolphin, boto, bouto, pink river dolphinhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/62.shtmlThe largest of the world?s five freshwater dolphin species. It relies on echolocation to find prey in the muddy rivers that it inhabits.1Lesser Egyptian jerboa, desert jerboahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/620.shtmlA small jumping mouse-like rodent with very large hind legs and a long tail. It spends the day in a burrow in the desert and comes out at night in search of seeds and plants.1Giant pangolinhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/621.shtmlA strange-looking creature likened to a living pinecone, with a long prehensile tail.1Cape pangolinhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/622.shtmlThe Cape pangolin lives in a burrow, seeking ant and termite nests by scent at night.1Small-scaled tree pangolinhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/623.shtmlThe tree pangolin spends the day in hollow trees or excavated termite nests, seeking ant and termite nests by scent at night.1Long-tailed pangolinhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/624.shtmlThe long-tailed pangolin is completely arboreal, spending the day in hollow trees and seeking ant nests by scent at night.1African asshttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/625.shtmlThis is the smallest member of the horse family and is critically endangered. The African ass is a grey-coated relative of our domestic donkey living in the rocky deserts of Africa.1Plains zebrahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/628.shtmlThe most familiar of the striped members of the horse family, living in harems on the grasslands of Africa.1Water chevrotainhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/629.shtmlA deer-like animal the size of a rabbit, and intermediate in their physiology between pigs and deer. Water chevrotains live in dense African rainforest near water, and are nocturnal and solitary.1Ganges river dolphinhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/63.shtmlThe Ganges river dolphin is completely blind, but hunts for prey using echolocation. They frequently swim on their sides, returning to the upright position when surfacing for air.1Wildfacts - Okapihttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/630.shtmlA solitary, forest-living member of the giraffe family with a dark velvety coat, white stripes on its rump and legs, and large ears.1Wildfacts - Bushbuckhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/632.shtmlA member of the spiral-horned antelopes with a chocolaty coat. Lives in dense vegetation, often near water, and browses vegetation at night.1Lesser kuduhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/633.shtmlA shy reddish-brown antelope with distinctive white stripes and large ears. The males have impressive spiral horns.1Greater kuduhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/634.shtmlOne of the largest antelopes, the greater kudu is a rich brown colour with white stripes. Males have spiral horns over a metre long and a beard under the chin.1Wildfacts - Gerenukhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/636.shtmlA gazelle with very long legs and a long neck which stands on its hind legs to feed from trees on the African savannah.1Wildfacts - Impalahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/637.shtmlA grazing antelope from Africa which lives in single-sex herds. The males have impressive lyre-shaped horns.1Moose, elkhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/639.shtmlThe largest deer living a solitary life browsing in northern forests. A fast runner and good swimmer. The males have very large palmate antlers.1Indus river dolphinhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/64.shtmlAs with most river dolphins, this species is highly endangered.1Yapok, water opossumhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/640.shtmlAn aquatic marsupial - a member of the opossum family - with black and grey waterproof fur, webbed hind feet and a backward-pointing pouch in both sexes.1Grant's golden molehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/641.shtmlA member of the ancient native group of African mammals and not related to European moles, the golden moles are solitary, blind burrowers with shiny pale brown fur. Grant's golden mole particularly specialises in eating termites.1American water shrewhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/642.shtmlA large, solitary shrew which uses its hind feet to swim underwater in search of aquatic insect larvae.1Wildfacts - Topihttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/646.shtmlA grazing antelope with a mahogany and black coat that lives in herds on African grasslands. Males form 'leks' where they compete and display to females.1Wildfacts - Chitalhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/647.shtmlA large spotted deer living in small groups in the woodlands of India and Sri Lanka.1Fringe-lipped bathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/648.shtmlA bat that specialises in hunting frogs by listening to their mating calls, and selecting the non-poisonous species.1New Zealand sea lionhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/649.shtmlAn endangered species of sea lion which lives around the coasts of New Zealand and its surrounding islands.1La Plata dolphin, Franciscanahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/65.shtmlLittle is known about these river dolphins although they are frequently caught up and killed in fishing nets.1Philippine colugohttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/651.shtmlA little known forest-living animal which has a huge gliding membrane and makes spectacular leaps from tree to tree in the Philippine rainforests.1Southern flying squirrelhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/652.shtmlA small, gliding squirrel from North America.1American bighorn sheephttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/653.shtmlA stocky sheep with very large horns living in the mountains of North America. The males stage impressive fights each year, and have extra-thick skulls to prevent brain damage during clashes.1Honey possumhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/655.shtmlA tiny marsupial, the only survivor of an ancient group, which lives only on nectar and pollen and hold a number of extraordinary records amongst mammals: the smallest newborns, the largest testes in proportion to body size, and the largest sperm.1Mountain pygmy possumhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/656.shtmlAn unusual marsupial that was first described as a fossil species, then discovered to be still alive and living at the top of mountains in Australia.1Wildfacts - Numbathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/657.shtmlThe only marsupial ant- or termite-eater, and the only marsupial to be active fully during the day. Numbats are very distinctive because of their black and white rump stripes and facial markings.1Virginia opossumhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/658.shtmlA marsupial that lives in North America, and is often seen in urban environments. It 'plays dead' when threatened by predators.1White-faced capuchin, white-throated capuchinhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/659.shtmlA cream and black capuchin monkey living in groups in the forests of Central and South America.1Chinese river dolphin, baijihttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/66.shtmlOne captive Chinese river dolphin, Qi-Qi (male), provided most of all known information about this species.1Bearded sakihttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/660.shtmlA monkey with dense black hair, slightly lighter on the back, and a black beard. They live in groups in the canopy of the Amazonian rainforest.1Saddle-back tamarinhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/661.shtmlA tamarin monkey with very variable colour over its range, living in family groups where only one female breeds and the rest of the group helps rear the twins.1Red howlerhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/662.shtmlA monkey renowned for its loud call, which the males make to tell other groups where the troop is currently feeding. This helps them save energy by avoiding having to patrol a territory and conflicting with neighbours.1Blue monkey, Sykes monkeyhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/663.shtmlA guenon monkey with several colour variations over its range. Females stay with their mothers, forming territorial female-dominated groups with only a single male.1L'Hoest's monkeyhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/664.shtmlA guenon monkey living in small female-dominated groups with only a single male.1Sooty mangabey, white mangabeyhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/665.shtmlA long-tailed relative of the baboons, mangabeys live in mixed groups on the forest floor.1Olive colobushttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/666.shtmlA brindled colobus monkey, in which the females have the unusual habit of carrying their young in their mouth.1Campbell's monkeyhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/667.shtmlA quiet and camouflaged guenon monkey, living in small groups in the West African forest.1New Zealand short-tailed bathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/668.shtmlOne of the two native mammals of New Zealand (both bats), this bat has evolved to be able to forage for invertebrates on the ground, as well as in the air.1Brown antechinushttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/671.shtmlThe brown antechinus is a rat-sized, nocturnal, forest dwelling marsupial found only in Australia.1Yellow-footed rock wallabyhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/672.shtmlThe yellow-footed rock wallaby, as its name suggests, is one of the most colourful members of the kangaroo family. Living in rocky terrain it has developed a way of using its short forelimbs rather like a tight rope performer's pole, to balance its acrobat jumps.1Southern plains woodrathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/674.shtmlSouthern plains woodrats are little grey masters of building. They can construct houses over a metre high and thorny enough to deter any would be predators.1Kirk's dik dikhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/675.shtmlKirk's dik diks are shy elusive creatures, who pair for life and maintain family territories. Their distinctive zig-zag path of escape and 'dik-dik' call of alarm have earnt them their name.1Wildfacts - Marahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/676.shtmlA rodent which looks a bit like a small deer with long ears, and which lives on the plains and scrubland of Argentina. Males and females form long-term pair bonds, but the young form creches.1Little brown bathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/677.shtmlLittle brown bats are just as their name suggests. These long-lived bats are abundant across most of North America, their numbers having grown with the increased availability of suitable roosting sites, such as attics and mines, provided by the ever-growing human population.1Senegal bush babyhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/678.shtmlA nocturnal primate with thick soft fur and long hind legs and tail that help it jump from branch to branch in search of insects, fruit and gum.1Southern tamanduahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/679.shtmlA tree-climbing anteater with golden fur and a long prehensile tail.1Short-beaked echidna, common echidna, spiny anteaterhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/680.shtmlAlong with platypuses, echidnas are the only egg-laying mammals.1Common wombathttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/683.shtmlLike rodents, wombats' teeth grow continuously to compensate for the wear and tear caused by the silica in grasses.1Spinner dolphin, long-snouted dolphinhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/69.shtmlSpinner dolphins are renowned for their fantastic acrobatic displays.1Atlantic spinner dolphin, short-snouted spinner dolphinhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/70.shtmlSpinner dolphins are renowned for their fantastic acrobatic displays.1Wildfacts - Aardwolfhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/700.shtmlDespite being a member of the hyena family, aardwolves differ in many ways - one of them being their diet of termites.1Striped dolphin, euphrosyne dolphinhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/71.shtmlStriped dolphins are active and very acrobatic.1Atlantic white-sided dolphinhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/74.shtmlThis is a highly gregarious species, occasionally being sighted in groups of up to 1,000.1White-beaked dolphinhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/78.shtmlLike many cetaceans, white-beaked dolphins are threatened by hunting, prey depletion, pollution and entanglement in nets.1Commerson's dolphin, piebald dolphinhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/79.shtmlWith their harlequin-shaped markings, Commerson's dolphins are striking, and variable in pattern.1Heaviside's dolphin, Benguelahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/81.shtmlThese rare dolphins feed on bottom-dwelling fish and squid.1Fraser's dolphin, sarawakhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/83.shtmlThese tropical dolphins live in large schools and are shy of boats. Although scientists had been aware of their existence for many years, they were not actively seen alive until the 1970s.1Wildfacts - Oystercatcherhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/830.shtmlA black and white wading bird with a long, bright-red bill which it uses to break into shellfish, each individual inheriting a particular tecnique from its parents.1Manx shearwaterhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/831.shtmlThese seabirds glide along the troughs of waves and nest in burrows.1Southern right whale dolphinhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/84.shtmlThese common dolphins are sleek and streamlined. They are named after right whales because they both lack dorsal fins.1Northern right whale dolphinhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/85.shtmlThese dolphins have been spotted in pods as large as 3,000. Like their namesake, the right whale, they lack a dorsal fin.1Melon-headed whalehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/86.shtmlThese bizarre-looking dolphins tend to remain in deep water, and rarely swim close to the land.1Tropical dolphinhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/88.shtmlThe tropical dolphin is perhaps the most little-known of all cetaceans.1False killer whale, pseudorcahttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/89.shtmlFalse killer whales have unusual flippers - they have an 'elbow', like that of the long-finned pilot whale. They are also known to strand. On one tragic occasion, 800 stranded at once.1Irrawaddy, snubfin dolphinhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/90.shtmlIn Vietnam, these dolphins are seen as sacred, and fisherman will release trapped individuals from their nets. They have also been known to drive fish into nets, although this is possibly accidental.1Southern killer whale, southern orca http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/92.shtmlOrcas are one of the fastest animals in the sea. The record holder is a male timed at 55.5 km/h (34.5 mph). They are also one of the most widespread mammals on Earth.1Risso's dolphinhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/93.shtmlRisso's dolphins are easily identifiable by their scarred skin. This is caused by other Risso's dolphins who use their front teeth when playing and fighting.1Flatback turtlehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/930.shtmlA flat-shelled Australian turtle.1Green turtlehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/931.shtmlGreen turtles are one of the most widespread species of marine turtle, found in tropical and subtropical waters throughout the globe.1Hawksbill turtlehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/932.shtmlA small, tropical marine turtle with a very attractive shiny shell, often used ornamentally as 'tortoiseshell'.1Leatherback turtlehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/933.shtmlThe largest turtle, with no hard shell, which can survive in cool waters and dive deep in search of jellyfish and other food.1Long-finned pilot whalehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/94.shtmlDue to their strong family ties, long-finned pilot whales often strand themselves in large numbers. When one animal strands the rest of the pod follows.1Striped possumhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/943.shtmlA nocturnal marsupial which uses its elongated fourth finger and large incisors to extract grubs from under tree bark. Like a skunk, it also emits a distinctive odour.1Asian house shrewhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/944.shtmlA large and widespread species of shrew which often enters buildings and has a strange jangling call.1Rough-toothed dolphin, slopeheadhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/97.shtmlRough-toothed dolphins can be mistaken for bottlenoses, although they do not have such prominent beaks. They are sometimes seen with bottlenose dolphins, spinner dolphins, spotted dolphins and pilot whales.1Tucuxi, estuarine dolphin http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/98.shtmlThese timid little dolphins are unusual in that they are found in both salt water and fresh water.1Indo-Pacific hump-backed dolphinhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildfacts/factfiles/99.shtmlPopulations of these dolphins found in the west have a hump that the dorsal fin sits on. Those in the east lack a hump and can sometimes get confused with bottlenose dolphins. Their unusual coloration makes them easy to spot.1Latest Wildlifehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildlife/by/latestExplore a wealth of video, sounds, stories and breaking news to find out more about your favourite animals, how they live and where they live. This page gives you access to the latest animals and plants, their habitats and adaptations.1What's Newhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/wildlife/by/updated1